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Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem

 
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User ID: 149436
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06/05/2009 08:18 PM
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Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
[link to www.cbc.ca]


So the weather's ideal and you're raring to enjoy the great outdoors — but you're feeling fatigued, and you're suffering from chills, fever, headache, muscle and joint pain. Maybe swollen lymph nodes, too.

Can't figure out why you're coming down with conditions you'd expect to feel in the winter?

Could be you're in the early stages of Lyme disease — a condition first identified in the mid-1970s. The disease was named after the town where the first cases were diagnosed — Lyme, Conn. The illness is caused by the bite of two species of ticks — blacklegged ticks (sometimes called deer ticks) and western blacklegged ticks.

Lyme disease was unknown in Canada up until the 1980s. Initially, it was identified only at Long Point and Point Pelee, Ont. — which is the farthest south you can get in Canada.

The Public Health Agency of Canada says the ticks that carry Lyme disease have been found in a wider area of Ontario, including:

* Rondeau Provincial Park, south of Chatham in southwestern Ontario.
* Turkey Point on the shore of Lake Erie, southwest of Toronto.
* Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area and St. Lawrence Islands National Park in the Thousand Islands region of eastern Ontario.

In Nova Scotia, blacklegged tick populations have been found in the Lunenburg and Bedford areas.

In Western Canada, ticks carrying Lyme disease have been found in the southeastern corner of Manitoba.

In British Columbia, western blacklegged ticks are fairly widely distributed but seem to be more common in the Lower Mainland as well as on Vancouver Island and in the Fraser Valley.

There have been sporadic reports of Lyme disease cases in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador. As well, western blacklegged ticks were found in Edmonton in July 2007.

In August 2008, the Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation, a patient advocacy group, said levels of Lyme disease are being underreported across the country — an assertion rejected by medical authorities including the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada. CanLyme called for improved diagnostic testing, saying annual infection rates ranged from 2,000 to 20,000.

Lyme disease has become the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it receives reports of 20,000 cases a year. But the agency estimates that that represents only about 10 per cent of the total.
How do ticks pass on the disease?

Blacklegged ticks live for about two years. They have three feeding stages: larvae, nymph and adult. When a young tick feeds on an infected animal, it picks up a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. It's normally carried by mice, squirrels, birds and other small animals.

The bacterium then lives in the gut of the tick. If you are the tick's next meal after it's ingested infected blood, you could show symptoms in three to 30 days.

Most cases are reported in late spring and summer, when the young ticks are most active and people are outdoors more often. Ticks often feed on deer but don't infect them very often. Deer are important to the tick population because they provide them with a lot of food — and a mode of transportation over long distances, which is important in maintaining the tick population.

Health Canada estimates that about 10 per cent of blacklegged ticks in any infected area carry the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
What are the symptoms of Lyme disease?

The first sign that you may be infected is a circular rash surrounding the spot where the tick bit you. It'll show up between three and 30 days after the tick helped itself to your blood. The rash may be followed by symptoms like fatigue, chills, fever, headache, muscle and joint pain and swollen lymph nodes.

If left untreated, the disease can progress to a second phase, which can last several months. Symptoms in the second phase include migraines, weakness, multiple skin rashes, painful or stiff joints, abnormal heartbeat and extreme fatigue.

Still not seeking treatment? Well, it's highly unlikely that you will die, but you may suffer symptoms such as chronic arthritis and neurological symptoms, including headaches, dizziness, numbness and paralysis.
Is there a cure?

Lyme disease is generally easy to treat with antibiotics in its early stages. But if left too long, treatment may involve several rounds of antibiotics.
How do I protect myself?

Make yourself a difficult meal for a tick.

Nova Scotia zoologist Andrew Hebda notes that ticks aren't very active. They can't leap at you as you walk by. But if you brush up against them, they can latch on to you. Hebda recommends that you stay on trails and avoid deep bush.

Health Canada offers several tips, including:

* If infected ticks are in your area, wear long-sleeved shirts that fit tightly around the wrist, and long-legged pants tucked into socks or boots. Light-coloured clothing makes it easier to see if there are any ticks on your clothes.
* Wear shoes that cover your entire foot - avoid sandals in areas where ticks might be.
* Use insect repellents that contain DEET to repel ticks. Repellents can be applied to clothing as well as exposed skin.

How easy is it spot a tick?

Adult ticks are about two- to five-millimetres long and are not too difficult to spot. But in their nymph form, they are the size of a poppy seed. At this stage, the nymph requires a blood meal to reach adulthood.

"Basically look for freckles that move," Hebda said.
What should I do if I find a tick?

If the tick is embedded in your skin, Hebda says, using tweezers, carefully remove it without detaching its mouth. It's virtually impossible to identify species of ticks without the mouth part. Health Canada labs will not analyze ticks if they are missing the mouth.

"If you can't remove it," Hebda says, "see your family physician."
Do ticks tend to seek out specific areas of the body?

Blacklegged ticks need about 48 hours for a proper feeding. Hebda says they tend to seek out more secluded parts of your body, like "behind the knees and points further north."

Hebda adds, despite the risk, there's absolutely no reason you should avoid the woods or stay away from trails.

"When you come in, just wipe yourself off and take a gander, see if there's anything moving."
What other steps can I take to minimize the risk?

There are several steps you can take to make sure your yard does not become a haven for ticks that might be able to infect you with Lyme disease.

* Keep grass on your property well cut to reduce the amount of habitat suitable for ticks.
* Remove leaves and brush around your house and at the edges of lawns.
* Create a barrier of wood chips between lawns and wooded areas to restrict the migration of ticks. Ticks love cool, damp areas. They hate hot, dry places.
* Check your pets regularly for ticks.
* Keep the ground around bird feeders clean.
* Stack wood neatly and in dry areas.
* Keep playground equipment, decks and patios away from the edge of your yard and away from trees.
* Discourage deer: if they come on your property, don't feed them. Construct barriers to prevent them from coming on to your property.

Are there other illnesses that can be passed on by ticks?

Yes. Ticks can pass on more than just Lyme disease. These include:

* Human granulocytic anaplasmosis — a disease that is often difficult to diagnose because symptoms can be non-specific. Most people experience headaches, fever, chills, myalgia and an overall sensation of not feeling well.
* Human babesiosis — a malaria-like infection first identified in the U.S. on Nantucket Island in Massachusettes. Powassan encephalitis virus — a potentially deadly disease named for the Ontario town where it was first diagnosed. There have been as many as 27 cases across North America since 1958.

Tick-borne illnesses normally present themselves between June and September.
Anonymous Coward
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United States
06/05/2009 08:23 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
been there done that...if you have more than ten symptoms of any disease...you probably have lyme disease... get it early, I ignored it, and it took me almost three years to get over it... if you get at it early it only takes a couple of weeks to cure.
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 08:27 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
I know this is a serious thread, but
I gotta tell ya:

When I read the thread title, my brain saw
"Lyme disease: Tiny dick, big problem"
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 08:58 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Interesting and informative article regarding Lyme Disease and TAO free Cats Claw:


[link to www.newswithviews.com]
Angel Girl on Cloud 9

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06/05/2009 09:00 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Thanks Free Store.

These tiny little things can cause huge issues for people.
"Careful or you will end up in my novel"

Angel
Free Store (OP)

User ID: 149436
Canada
06/05/2009 09:12 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Growing up in Vancouver never encountered a tick ever and Vancouver was a big back yard to grow up in


Now there are ticks everywhere in Southern BC and my first tick bite was four years ago. I have had four ticks since and removed everyone successfully..

Now I wait till the Summer before going into the deep forest when they are least active in the warm weather

Alcohol does work in removing them and carry some in my pack in case
angst wiper nli
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06/05/2009 09:20 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
I live in Ct.... maybe 50 miles from Lyme, and work in an infusion pharmacy that has a lot of Lyme patients... It's a nasty disease. Could be bio-war escaped pathogen from Plum Island for all we know.

Though the protocol is 30 days of antibiotics, many say that does not cure it... we have some patients who have been on treatment for years.

If I had it, I would insist on Doxy though they usually give Rocephin or Zosyn.
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:24 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Got bit last week, two days later...cold sweats and the red target on my arm. Dr. gave me doxy. Only 10 days worth, though, should I ask for a refill when it's up? Arm is still red, and I'm still.
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:25 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
sorry- still not feeling so great.
Free Store (OP)

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06/05/2009 09:38 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
sorry- still not feeling so great.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 572354

Sorry to hear your not feeling very well..but I am sure as heck you will feel better



:iu:
Anonymous Coward
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United States
06/05/2009 09:41 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
hf
Just ready for the aches and crazy sweats to stop. Thanks!
Leo****
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06/05/2009 09:41 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
I recognize the problem, most definitely as being a dog owner since a year.

Dogs attract ticks like magnets, little wonder since they love to move about in the type of vegetation where ticks are lurking around for something to attach to.

Actually, the very day the snow started to melt away our dog got the first tick of the season. I was amazed how early they appeared this year. Pulled the tick immediately of course. It was fully alive and I incinerated it I usually do.

As you know there are all kinds of chemical treatments to make dogs immune to tick infestations, for a certain time period. I purchased one of those "solutions" last season already, Frontline vet. Since she was just a little puppy at the time I never actually used it on my dog last season, and this season I still regard her as a little puppy. Ok, she is 75 pounds at the present (pure muscles and bones) but still a puppy until approx 2 years of age for this breed. A fragile being. I can't get myself to subject her to stuff that would be poison to kids coming in contact with the dog, not mentioning devastation to fish in lakes if she would take a bath.

So I searched for other solutions after this first tick of the year. I found an intriguing idea, using an amber dog collar as tick repellent. Looks very nice as well but this is immaterial.

This may seem like pure unscientific bullshit but I don't care: that amber collar actually keeps our dog free of ticks. We've found *one* tick on her after we started to use the amber collar a few months ago. I pulled that tick and it showed to be stone dead under microscope. I admit I cannot understand why this would work. There are theories but I find the far fetched.

Reportedly, when amber collars work it has something to do with the type of fur. This is a Rottie, quite short fur. It seems not to work on dogs with long fur from people that tried it.

Someone has to perform some serious research on this, it feel like voodoo but I really don't care as long as it works.

If you have tried amber collars on your dog or on yourself please give some feedback!

/L
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:44 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Got bit last week, two days later...cold sweats and the red target on my arm. Dr. gave me doxy. Only 10 days worth, though, should I ask for a refill when it's up? Arm is still red, and I'm still.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 572354


Yes, I'd ask to get treated for up to a month if I were you.

I also think a Terminator Zapper will help a lot... maybe most of all.
Jackinthebox

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06/05/2009 09:47 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Lyme disease is no joke. And once you have it, you can relapse at any time. Furthermore, subsequent infections will not display traditionally characteristic symptoms.

What is not often reported, is that it can effect your thinking as well. Within days of being infected for the fisrt time, I became extremely violent without any substantial provocation. People thought I had rabies in fact.
When the Lamb opened the third seal, I heard the third living creature say, "Come!" I looked, and there before me was a black horse! Its rider was holding a pair of scales in his hand.

Then I heard what sounded like a voice among the four living creatures, saying, "A quart of wheat for a day's wages, and three quarts of barley for a day's wages, and do not damage the oil and the wine!"


-Revelation 6:5, 6:6
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:47 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Is there a test for Lyme Disease?
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:51 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Got bit last week, two days later...cold sweats and the red target on my arm. Dr. gave me doxy. Only 10 days worth, though, should I ask for a refill when it's up? Arm is still red, and I'm still.


Yes, I'd ask to get treated for up to a month if I were you.

I also think a Terminator Zapper will help a lot... maybe most of all.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 153788

I will do that. I watched a dear lady die very slowly of Lymes because the doctors didn't diagnose her properly. It was truly horrible. What is a Terminator Zapper?
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:54 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Got bit last week, two days later...cold sweats and the red target on my arm. Dr. gave me doxy. Only 10 days worth, though, should I ask for a refill when it's up? Arm is still red, and I'm still.


Yes, I'd ask to get treated for up to a month if I were you.

I also think a Terminator Zapper will help a lot... maybe most of all.

I will do that. I watched a dear lady die very slowly of Lymes because the doctors didn't diagnose her properly. It was truly horrible. What is a Terminator Zapper?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 572354

Taser for bugs?
A Handheld Unit would be much more fun tho LOL
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:54 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Like a bug-zapper?
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 09:55 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
lflash
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06/05/2009 10:03 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
I will do that. I watched a dear lady die very slowly of Lymes because the doctors didn't diagnose her properly. It was truly horrible. What is a Terminator Zapper?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 572354

Got my zapper here...scroll down the page for info..
[link to www.toolsforhealing.com]
Jackinthebox

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06/05/2009 10:04 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Is there a test for Lyme Disease?
 Quoting: RememberThis


Yes, there are several actually. But none are completely reliable, especially if you already have had it and been treated. Subsequent infections are very difficult to test for.
When the Lamb opened the third seal, I heard the third living creature say, "Come!" I looked, and there before me was a black horse! Its rider was holding a pair of scales in his hand.

Then I heard what sounded like a voice among the four living creatures, saying, "A quart of wheat for a day's wages, and three quarts of barley for a day's wages, and do not damage the oil and the wine!"


-Revelation 6:5, 6:6
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 10:06 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Is there a test for Lyme Disease?


Yes, there are several actually. But none are completely reliable, especially if you already have had it and been treated. Subsequent infections are very difficult to test for.
 Quoting: Jackinthebox

Thx !
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 10:06 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
2 of the little fuggers so far this year.
Leo****
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06/05/2009 10:06 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
If amber collars seem to work fine as tick repellent/killer on at least some dog breeds, cold it work also on humans? That's a question.

A slight complication could be that humans don't have fur, at least not to the extent of typical Rotties... but who knows what fur quality has anything to do with the success rate of amber collars. Future research perhaps.

Well it is just an idea...

I guess noone would like to use Exspot, Frontline, Scalibor etc on themselves or their kids to keep those pesky ticks away so we have to get creative here.

/L
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 10:20 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
If amber collars seem to work fine as tick repellent/killer on at least some dog breeds, cold it work also on humans? That's a question.

A slight complication could be that humans don't have fur, at least not to the extent of typical Rotties... but who knows what fur quality has anything to do with the success rate of amber collars. Future research perhaps.

Well it is just an idea...

I guess noone would like to use Exspot, Frontline, Scalibor etc on themselves or their kids to keep those pesky ticks away so we have to get creative here.

/L
 Quoting: Leo**** 674177

Is your family hirsute? Like Sasquatch? LOL jk
Better to just remove them than poison oneself or ones family.
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 10:25 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Got bit last week, two days later...cold sweats and the red target on my arm. Dr. gave me doxy. Only 10 days worth, though, should I ask for a refill when it's up? Arm is still red, and I'm still.


Yes, I'd ask to get treated for up to a month if I were you.

I also think a Terminator Zapper will help a lot... maybe most of all.

I will do that. I watched a dear lady die very slowly of Lymes because the doctors didn't diagnose her properly. It was truly horrible. What is a Terminator Zapper?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 572354



[link to www.toolsforhealing.com]
{ARCHER}

User ID: 599924
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06/05/2009 10:27 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
DEET DEET DEET and more DEET.
Buy cheep repellent with 40-50% DEET and spray your boots and cloths with it.

Check yourself every night, even if you havent been in the woods.

Last Edited by {ARCHER} on 06/05/2009 10:29 PM
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 10:30 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Ticktards...


just kidding....
Anonymous Coward
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New Zealand
06/05/2009 10:34 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
When I read the thread title, my brain saw
"Lyme disease: Tiny dick, big problem"
 Quoting: acadian

same here

it is GLP after all
picesnator

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06/05/2009 10:34 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
yes they are very nasty little creatures.....
Anonymous Coward
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06/05/2009 10:38 PM
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Re: Lyme disease: Tiny tick, big problem
Ticktards...


just kidding....
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 153788

lolsign

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