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Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard

 
coolhandluke74
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07/04/2009 07:10 AM
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Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
CONCORD, N.H. – Tomato plants have been removed from stores in half a dozen states as a destructive and infectious plant disease makes its earliest and most widespread appearance ever in the eastern United States.

Late blight — the same disease that caused the Irish Potato Famine in the 1840s — occurs sporadically in the Northeast, but this year's outbreak is more severe for two reasons: infected plants have been widely distributed by big-box retail stores and rainy weather has hastened the spores' airborne spread.

The disease, which is not harmful to humans, is extremely contagious and experts say it most likely spread on garden center shelves to plants not involved in the initial infection. It also can spread once plants reach their final destination, putting tomato and potato plants in both home gardens and commercial fields at risk.

Meg McGrath, professor of plant pathology at Cornell University, calls late blight "worse than the Bubonic Plague for plants."

"People need to realize this is probably one of the worst diseases we have in the vegetable world," she said. "It's certain death for a tomato plant."

Tomato plants have been removed from Home Depot, Wal-Mart, Lowe's and Kmart stores in all six New England states, plus New York. Late blight also has been identified in all other East Coast states except Georgia, as well as Alabama, West Virginia and Ohio, McGrath said.

It is too early in the season to know whether infected plants will taint large crops or negatively affect commercial growers. But if that happens, growers could be forced to raise prices to cover costs associated with combating the disease.

Agriculture officials in the various states still are trying to determine where the outbreak started. One major grower, Alabama-based Bonnie Plants, supplies most of the tomato plants to big-box stores, but it is unclear whether the plants were infected before or after leaving the supplier's multiple greenhouses.

"There's no way in the world you can pin this on one plant company, but we just happen to be the biggest," said Dennis Thomas, the company's general manager.

The company has regularly inspected greenhouses in 38 states, including Maine, New Hampshire and New York. Its most recent inspections — in New Jersey and Pennsylvania — found no evidence of disease.

"We've not been written up one time for any late blight disease that was confirmed," Thomas said, noting that Bonnie Plants sprays seedlings before shipping them to stores, but that doesn't happen after the plants arrive. He said the company was proactive in removing plants once the outbreak occurred.

In the meantime, plant experts are warning gardeners to be on the lookout for the disease and to take quick action if it crops up. The first sign is often brown spots on plant stems, followed by nickel-sized olive-green or brown spots on the tops of leaves and fuzzy white fungal growth underneath. Tomato fruit will show firm, brown spots.

Spraying with fungicides can control late blight if begun before symptoms appear, but many plant experts recommend removing and destroying the plants instead to prevent spores from traveling.

Donald Flannery, executive director of the Maine Potato Board, said the state's potato farmers are concerned, but not in crisis mode.

"It's pretty easy to make our growers aware of it, that's the simple part. But what we've started to do is really reach out to home gardeners throughout Maine to ask them to be very diligent about checking their tomato plants or potato plants," he said.

Hilary Chapman of Hopkinton, N.H., hasn't yet seen any signs of blight on her four tomato plants — two she planted from seed and two purchased from a small local greenhouse.

"I have one plant that has two tomatoes on it, and everything looks good," she said, "but I'll be watching."
Anonymous Coward
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07/04/2009 07:20 AM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
dead
Anonymous Coward
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07/04/2009 07:22 AM
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hmmm somthing that cant harm humans ok so lets eat these infected tomatos? and stop there rapid evil killing of other tomatos that is all
coolhandluke74 (OP)

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07/04/2009 07:24 AM
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tomato
coolhandluke74 (OP)

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07/05/2009 05:38 AM
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bump
FallenAwaken
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07/05/2009 05:41 AM
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DEAD SUN/DEAD WORLD...

The world is dying now at the END in here..

However...
It has ALWAYS BEEN DEAD..And that is the point to understand..This is the PAST..

The MASK/LIE is just coming off..AGAIN..

It's like only being able to PRETEND for just so long..Or only being able to SUPPRESS A BAD MEMORY and NOT FACE something uncomfortable for just so long..

What you SUPPRESS..Always comes to the SURFACE sooner or later..One way or another..
Hillcrest

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07/05/2009 05:43 AM
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crap
Water always wins. :sun:
FallenAwaken
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07/05/2009 05:49 AM
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IF we continue to SINK..It will just all get WORSE..

Either WE STAND UP..OR THEY DO..

Will this SHIP SINK?..Will the LIGHT/SUN go out?..

WE have begun SINKING..Will we TURN this SHIP AROUND and STAND UP?..

Or will the usual FATE of this EVIL place and EVIL SOURCE win AGAIN?..

It is much like a LIGHT BULB that gets HOTTER and HOTTER until it POPS!..BLOWS!...


ICY SUN with FROSTY GLOW..The WALL OF SLEEP..


The CONVERSION has begun..
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 09:54 AM
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IF we continue to SINK..It will just all get WORSE..

Either WE STAND UP..OR THEY DO..

Will this SHIP SINK?..Will the LIGHT/SUN go out?..

WE have begun SINKING..Will we TURN this SHIP AROUND and STAND UP?..

Or will the usual FATE of this EVIL place and EVIL SOURCE win AGAIN?..

It is much like a LIGHT BULB that gets HOTTER and HOTTER until it POPS!..BLOWS!...


ICY SUN with FROSTY GLOW..The WALL OF SLEEP..


The CONVERSION has begun..
 Quoting: FallenAwaken 718502


Tomato =Heart stain= blubbery = tota luna la loonica
Hillcrest

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07/05/2009 01:31 PM
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what the bloody hell is happening these days everythign is starting to fall like dominos.
Water always wins. :sun:
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 01:33 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
So what does it look like? The reason I ask is I have tomatoe plants outside and also inside a greenhouse.... I have noticed a eggplant next to the ones outside looks weird....
The Chef

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07/05/2009 01:44 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
It has been much cooler and very wet here in the east. So that contributes. My tomato plants have been doing very well but they didn't come from a store I grew them from seeds 100% organic. This year has seen many GMO crop failures all over the world and one can't help but wonder if some of this hasn't been planned to create some kind of famine or at least make the prices go sky high.
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 01:45 PM
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dead
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 711906

lmao
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 01:48 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
My tomato plants are doing very well for all the rain and lack of sun.

I have put them in a very well drained and composted place in my yard that gets SHADE for half the day. They grow a little slower but it beats the last 3 yrs of having them burnt to crisp by the end of July!! In the last few days with little rain and more sun they have started to really take off.
Long Island NY
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 01:51 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
My tomato plants so far are unaffected.
mr...bojangles

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07/05/2009 01:57 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
I`ve noticed a lot of fungus around trees as well....

and then the fungus kills the tree....

I know it has something to do with chemtrails....

cause chemtrails contain fungus spores....

it most likely is part of the chemtrail agenda....

kill all plants that are not gmo....
Beyond one's own mind there is no dazzling light to come shining in from outside to wake one up. If one recognizes one's own intrinsic State as pure from the beginning and only temporarily obscured by impurities, and if one maintains the presence of this recognition without becoming distracted, then all the impurities dissolve. This is the essence of the Path-namkhai norbu.

Why is there a legend about the descent of Christ into hell? The Teacher addressed the lower strata of the astral world, saying: �Why, by cherishing earthly thoughts, bind oneself eternally to Earth?� And many revolted in spirit and rose higher.
Thread: I shot video of the earth from my spacecraft, enjoy!
Lens Flare
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07/05/2009 02:01 PM

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Every tomato I cut open this year has black shit inside it

same with my neighbors


 Quoting: ^TrInItY^



Tell me I read that right.. damned
John 3:16 is Right
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:08 PM
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Every tomato I cut open this year has black shit inside it

same with my neighbors





Tell me I read that right.. damned
 Quoting: Lens Flare


yup he cut open his neighbours and they had black rot in side too!
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:13 PM
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My tomatoes are fine

Baltimore
refugee13

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07/05/2009 02:15 PM
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just great!!!
"Livin' The Dream..."

"Don't believe in anyone, 'cos they'll feel you so much more"

"So break me down if it makes you feel right~and hate me now if it keeps you alright~you can't break me down if it takes all your might~cause I'm so much more than meets the eye..."

"Some people would bitch if their ice cream was cold..."

135
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07/05/2009 02:18 PM
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gmo
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:24 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
NW Va. here.this time last year i had full grown pumpkins,carrotts,onions and green beans.This year i planted beans 2 times and only have 3 plants growing with no beans.Everything is way behind and a lot of stuff never came up.Something is really wrong here.
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:27 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
And so it begins...
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:28 PM
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Every tomato I cut open this year has black shit inside it

same with my neighbors

shame shame

We're on the East cost....
 Quoting: ^TrInItY^


YEP! No tomatoes from our gardens this year. We're in the NE.
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:35 PM
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where the FUCK did that come from?
The Chef

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07/05/2009 02:37 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
he earliest and most widespread case of a serious plant disease ever in the East is forcing the removal of tomato plants from stores in New York and New England. This infectious disease is called late blight, the same disease that caused the Irish Potato Famine in the 1840s. It does occur occasionally in the Northeast, but this year's rainy weather has accelerated the spores' airborne spread. On top of that, infected plants have been widely distributed by big-box retail stores.

According to the Associated Press, the disease is not harmful to humans, but it is quite contagious. It is most likely spread on garden center shelves to plants that were not involved in the initial infection. Once plants reach gardens, both home and commercial ones, the disease can also spread.

A big dip in the jet stream in the Northeast region has sent persistent rounds of showers and storms from the Great Lakes to New England and part of the mid-Atlantic in recent weeks. Conditions worsened this past week as strong disturbances squeezed out extra rain, extensive cloud cover and abnormally low temperatures.

New England has been hardest hit with Boston receiving nearly half of its normal July rainfall in the first two days of the month. Flooding and travel disruptions occurred late last week throughout much of New England.

New York City had its second wettest June on record with just over 10 inches of rain falling.

There will be a brief break from the extensive unsettled weather across most of New England on today, but spotty showers or storms could still impact northern parts of New Hampshire and Maine. More widespread showers and storms will return to New York and New England early in the upcoming week as a disturbance pushes across the region.

Tomato plants have been removed from Home Depot, Wal-Mart and Kmart stores in all of New England and New York, the areas that have been the wettest. Other cases, although not as widespread as in New England, have been found in almost every other East Coast state with the exception of Georgia.

If this becomes a widespread problem with large crops and negatively impacts commercial growers, it could force prices of tomatoes and other vegetables to rise, so that growers can cover costs of treating the late blight.

The overall weather pattern in recent weeks also favors the formation of mold and "black spot" fungus on certain flowers and vegetable plants. The cloudy, cool, rainy weather is bad enough. However, when the rain falls during the evening, it fails to evaporate on the leaves, which in turn promotes the fungus. This is why the best time of the day to water is during the early morning when the weather is dry. This allows the moisture to get to the roots, while evaporating off the leaves before problems begin.

While the application of fungicide can help prevent the spread of black spot, removal of the infected leaves or the entire plant may be necessary.

AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski contributed to the content of this story.

[link to www.accuweather.com]
The Chef

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07/05/2009 02:41 PM
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Growing has also been influenced by this


One of the reasons for this could be colder-than-normal weather across the northern tier of the country that has suppressed the number of thunderstorms and has significantly reduced the number of tornadoes this year. The number of reported tornadoes so far this year is 685, just over half of the average annual amount, which is 1,297.

According to Long Range Expert Joe Bastardi, areas from the northern Plains into the Northeast will have a "year without a summer." The jet stream, which is suppressed abnormally south this spring, is also suppressing the number of thunderstorms that can form. The ones that do form in areas of the Ohio Valley and West are forming in places with very cold temperatures, which can lead to more electrified thunderstorms than normal this year.
Aquarius 7

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07/05/2009 02:41 PM
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Nice find, CHL. 5 stars.
.

Cayce: “… The greater portion of Japan must go into the sea. …. then we may know it has begun …”. www.near-death.com/experiences/cayce11.html
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"Be kind, for everyone you know is fighting a hard battle" - Plato
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"Those who are at peace in their hearts already are in the Great Shelter of life." ~ Hopi Prophecy
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OneAngryMom

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07/05/2009 02:48 PM
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Re: Plant disease hits eastern US veggies early, hard
how many volcanoes erupted last fall/winter?

There's a clue.

Trinity....might be too late this year, but get those tomatoes pruned back some and get some garlic oil sprayed on them. Treat the soil with Epsom Salt water. Get rid of all the ripe tomatoes (even on the ground)....keep them away from the main plant(s).

Are your tomato leaves okay or are they yellow?

If it's really severe, put black landscape paper around the plants on the ground so any part of the vine touching the ground doesn't contaminate.

You MIGHT be able to save em....it's early enough, but it'll take 3-4 weeks for them to come back if they're gonna.
Anonymous Coward
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07/05/2009 02:49 PM
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I always grow my plants from seeds ever since I bought some cucumber plants at Wallmart and it spread some kind of fungus. I checked online and they said the fungus could live in the soil for years and the best thing to do was not grow cucumbers.
angry
The Chef

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07/05/2009 02:50 PM
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Here is the last year without a summer and yes parts of the country are hot as hell this is a regional event. It should be noted that we have had several large volcanic eruptions in the northern hemisphere this year (Russia and US, Alaska)While these volcanoes are smaller than the ones in 1816 the connection to the weather shouldn't be overlooked.

he Year Without a Summer (also known as the Poverty Year, Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death, and the Year There Was No Summer) was 1816, in which severe summer climate abnormalities destroyed crops in Northern Europe, the American Northeast and eastern Canada.[1][2] Historian John D. Post has called this "the last great subsistence crisis in the Western world".[3]

Most consider the climate anomaly to have been caused by a combination of a historic low in solar activity and a volcanic winter event; the latter caused by a succession of major volcanic eruptions capped off by the Mount Tambora eruption of 1815, the largest known eruption in over 1,600 years.


The unusual climatic aberrations of 1816 had the greatest effect on the American northeast, New England, the Canadian Maritimes, Newfoundland, and Northern Europe. Typically, the late spring and summer of the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada are relatively stable: temperatures (average of both day and night) average about 68–77 °F (20–25 °C), and rarely fall below 41 °F (5 °C). Summer snow is an extreme rarity, though May flurries sometimes occur.

In May 1816,[4] however, frost killed off most of the crops that had been planted, and in June two large snowstorms in eastern Canada and New England resulted in many human deaths. Nearly a foot (30 cm) of snow was observed in Quebec City in early June, with consequent additional loss of crops—most summer growing plants have cell walls which rupture in a mild frost, let alone a snowstorm coating the soils. The result was regional malnutrition, starvation, epidemic, and increased mortality—in short, famine.

In July and August, lake and river ice were observed as far south as Pennsylvania. Rapid, dramatic temperature swings were common, with temperatures sometimes reverting from normal or above-normal summer temperatures as high as 95 °F (35 °C) to near-freezing within hours. Even though farmers south of New England did succeed in bringing some crops to maturity, maize and other grain prices rose dramatically. Oats, for example, rose from 12¢ a bushel ($3.40/m³) the previous year to 92¢ a bushel ($26/m³)—nearly eight times as much—and oats are a necessary staple for an economy dependent upon horses for primary transportation. Those areas suffering local crop failures then had to deal with the lack of roads in the early 19th century, preventing any easy importation of bulky food stuffs.

In China, the cold weather killed trees, rice crops and even water buffalo, especially in northern China. Floods destroyed many remaining crops. Mount Tambora’s eruption disrupted China’s monsoon season, resulting in overwhelming floods in the Yangtze Valley in 1816. In India the delayed summer monsoon caused late torrential rains that aggravated the spread of cholera from a region near the River Ganges in Bengal to as far as Moscow.[5]

In the ensuing bitter winter of 1817, when the thermometer dropped to -26°F (-32 °C), the waters of New York's Upper Bay froze so hard that horse-drawn sleighs were driven across Buttermilk Channel from Brooklyn to Governors Island.[6]

The effects were widespread and lasted beyond the winter. In eastern Switzerland, the summers of 1816 and 1817 were so cool that an ice dam formed below a tongue of the Giétroz glacier high in the Val de Bagnes; in spite of the efforts of the engineer Ignaz Venetz to drain the growing lake, the ice dam collapsed catastrophically in June 1818.[7]

[edit] Causes

It is now generally thought that the aberrations occurred because of the 1815 (April 5–15) volcanic eruptions of Mount Tambora[8][9] on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia (then part of the Dutch East Indies), the world's largest eruption in about 1,600 years with a Volcanic Explosivity Index ranking of 7, a super-colossal event that ejected immense amounts of volcanic dust into the upper atmosphere. (Lake Taupo's Hatepe eruption of c. 180 AD was probably of similar size, see Supervolcano.) The fact that the 1815 eruptions occurred during the middle of the Dalton Minimum (a period of unusually low solar activity) is also significant.

Other large volcanic eruptions (with VEI at least 4) during the same time frame are:

* 1812, La Soufrière on Saint Vincent in the Caribbean
* 1812, Awu on Sangihe Islands, Indonesia
* 1813, Suwanose-Jima on Ryukyu Islands, Japan
* 1814, Mayon in the Philippines

These other eruptions had already built up a substantial amount of atmospheric dust. As is common following a massive volcanic eruption, temperatures fell worldwide because less sunlight passed through the atmosphere.

[edit] Effects

As a consequence of the series of volcanic eruptions, crops in the above cited areas had been poor for several years; the final blow came in 1815 with the eruption of Tambora. In America, many historians cite the "Year Without a Summer" as a primary motivation for the western movement and rapid settlement of what is now western and central New York and the American Midwest. Many New Englanders were wiped out by the year, and tens of thousands struck out for the richer soil and better growing conditions of the Upper Midwest (then the Northwest Territory).

Europe, still recuperating from the Napoleonic Wars, suffered from food shortages. Food riots broke out in Britain and France and grain warehouses were looted. The violence was worst in landlocked Switzerland, where famine caused the government to declare a national emergency. Huge storms, abnormal rainfall with floodings of the major rivers of Europe (including the Rhine) are attributed to the event, as was the frost setting in during August 1816. A BBC documentary using figures compiled in Switzerland estimated that fatality rates in 1816 were twice that of average years, giving an approximate European fatality total of 200,000 deaths.

The eruption of Tambora also caused Hungary to experience brown snow. Italy experienced something similar, with red snow falling throughout the year. The cause of this is believed to have been volcanic ash in the atmosphere.

In China, unusually low temperatures in summer and fall devastated rice production in Yunnan province in the southwest, resulting in widespread famine. Fort Shuangcheng, now in Heilongjiang province, reported fields disrupted by frost and conscripts deserting as a result. Summer snowfall was reported in various locations in Jiangxi and Anhui provinces, both in the south of the country. In Taiwan, which has a tropical climate, snow was reported in Hsinchu and Miaoli, while frost was reported in Changhua.

High levels of ash in the atmosphere led to unusually spectacular sunsets during this period, a feature celebrated in the paintings of J. M. W. Turner. It has been theorised that it was this that gave rise to the yellow tinge that is predominant in his paintings such as Chichester Canal circa 1828. A similar phenomenon was observed after the 1883 Krakatoa eruption, and on the West Coast of the United States following the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines.

The lack of oats to feed horses may have inspired the German inventor Karl Drais to research new ways of horseless transportation, which led to the invention of the Draisine or velocipede. This was the ancestor of the modern bicycle and a step towards mechanized personal transport.[11]

The crop failures of the “Year without Summer” forced the family of Joseph Smith to move from Sharon, Vermont to Palmyra, New York, precipitating a series of events culminating in the publication of the Book of Mormon and the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[12]

In July 1816 "incessant rainfall" during that "wet, ungenial summer" forced Mary Shelley, John William Polidori and their friends to stay indoors for much of their Swiss holiday. They decided to have a contest, seeing who could write the scariest story, leading Shelley to write Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus and Polidori to write The Vampyre.[13]

The Year without a Summer also inspired Lord Byron to write his 1816 poem Darkness.

The chemist Justus von Liebig, who had experienced the famine as a child in Darmstadt, later studied the nutrition of plants and introduced mineral fertilizers.

[link to en.wikipedia.org]