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Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?

 
darth maul
User ID: 716321
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07/06/2009 07:42 AM
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Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
[link to www.redicecreations.com]

Possibly the strongest evidence for it to be a 'hollow object' comes from the fact that when meteors strike the Moon, the latter rings like a bell. More specifically when the Apollo crew in November 20, 1969 released the lunar module, after returning to the orbiter, the module impact with the Moon caused their seismic equipment to register a continuous reverberation like a bell for more than an hour. The same effect occurred with Apollo 13's third stage which caused the Moon to ring for over three hours. So what's going on with the Moon?

Two Soviet scientists, Vasin and Shcherbokov, have spent much of their careers examining the facts compiled on lunar phenomena. Their conclusion is that the Moon is artificial, possibly a hollowed-out planet, and that it was steered from some distant region of the galaxy into a circular orbit around our planet (hence the extraordinary mystery of rock and Moon-dust age variations). They claim that intellectual life has existed in the Moon for eons.


[link to www.starwars.com]


[link to www.sliceofscifi.com]

[link to www.sliceofscifi.com]

[link to www.geekologie.com]

damned
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 07:51 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
The moon is made of green cheese and birds can't fly to it.

Common knowledge.

Frankly, I believe it has a half-filled, creamy center, like a smooth blue cheese dressing.

;)
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 07:54 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
If indeed the moon is partially hollow, it's also possible that it is extremely thin-walled at the poles.

As precise "punch" into one of the poles that can go 50 feet or more could net a "puncture".

This very thing will be attempted in October. In fact a "one-two" punch is being attempted in hopes that the second "craft" may explore inside the moon.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 08:06 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
The earth rings like a bell too, everytime lightning hits it (Schumann resonance), infact any solid object rings when hit, just at different frequencies, a tuning fork isn't hollow?

Take two solid metal balls, or imagine newtons cradle, the balls ring when hit, they aren't hollow.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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07/06/2009 08:06 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
But why would it be hollow? Who is planning a one-two punch? What explanation did they give for thinking that it's hollow?
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 08:16 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
A mmon vampire sucked it dry..sad soo sad
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 08:46 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
[link to www.disclose.tv]
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:32 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
But why would it be hollow? Who is planning a one-two punch? What explanation did they give for thinking that it's hollow?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 716321



NASA moon plunge in October...where have you been?...they are precisely aiming for the exact south pole...with two craft separated a bit in time.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:34 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
If natural spin-froming dynamics occurred on the moon when the body developed, it's possible that at the equator it's hundreds of miles thick and at the exact poles only 10's of feet. And somewhat hollow interior...the ringing says so.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:35 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
If natural spin-froming dynamics occurred on the moon when the body developed, it's possible that at the equator it's hundreds of miles thick and at the exact poles only 10's of feet. And somewhat hollow interior...the ringing says so.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 203352


NASA's two penetrating crafts will be able to collectively punch 50 feet (maybe more) into the south pole.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:37 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
[link to www.space.com]

Double sledge hammer.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:37 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
NASA Takes Aim at Moon with Double Sledgehammer

By Jeremy Hsu
Staff Writer
posted: 27 February 2008
7:00 am ET


Scientists are priming two spacecraft to slam into the moon's South Pole to see if the lunar double whammy reveals hidden water ice.

The Earth-on-moon violence may raise eyebrows, but NASA's history shows that such missions can yield extremely useful scientific observations.

"I think that people are apprehensive about it because it seems violent or crude, but it's very economical," said Tony Colaprete, the principal investigator for the mission at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

NASA's previous Lunar Prospector mission detected large amounts of hydrogen at the moon's poles before crashing itself into a crater at the lunar South Pole. Now the much larger Lunar Crater and Observation Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission, set for a February 2009 moon crash, will take aim and discover whether some of that hydrogen is locked away in the form of frozen water.

LCROSS will piggyback on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission for an Oct. 28 launch atop an Atlas 5 rocket equipped with a Centaur upper stage. While the launch will ferry LRO to the moon in about four days, LCROSS is in for a three-month journey to reach its proper moon smashing position. Once within range, the Centaur upper stage doubles as the main 4,400 pound (2,000 kg) impactor spacecraft for LCROSS.

The smaller Shepherding Spacecraft will guide Centaur towards its target crater, before dropping back to watch - and later fly through - the plume of moon dust and debris kicked up by Centaur's impact. The shepherding vehicle is packed with a light photometer, a visible light camera and four infrared cameras to study the Centaur's lunar plume before it turns itself into a second impactor and strikes a different crater about four minutes later.

"This payload delivery represents a new way of doing business for the center and the agency in general," said Daniel Andrews, LCROSS project manager at Ames, in a statement. "LCROSS primarily is using commercial-off-the-shelf instruments on this mission to meet the mission's accelerated development schedule and cost restraints."

Figuring out the final destinations for the $79 million LCROSS mission is "like trying to drive to San Francisco and not knowing where it is on the map," Colaprete said. He and other mission scientists hope to use observations from LRO and the Japanese Kaguya (Selene) lunar orbiter to map crater locations before LCROSS dives in.

"Nobody has ever been to the poles of the moon, and there are very unique craters - similar to Mercury - where sunlight doesn't reach the bottom," Colaprete said. Earth-based radar has also helped illuminate some permanently shadowed craters. By the time LCROSS arrives, it can zero in on its 19 mile (30 km) wide targets within 328 feet (100 meters).

Scientists want the impactor spacecraft to hit smooth, flat areas away from large rocks, which would ideally allow the impact plume to rise up out of the crater shadows into sunlight. That in turn lets LRO and Earth-based telescopes see the results.

"By understanding what's in these craters, we're examining a fossil record of the early solar system and would occurred at Earth 3 billion years ago," Colaprete said. LCROSS is currently aiming at target craters Faustini and Shoemaker, which Colaprete likened to "fantastic time capsules" at 3 billion and 3.5 billion years old.

LCROSS researchers anticipate a more than a 90 percent chance that the impactors will find some form of hydrogen at the poles. The off-chance exists that the impactors will hit a newer crater that lacks water - yet scientists can learn about the distribution of hydrogen either way.

"We take [what we learn] to the next step, whether it's rovers or more impactors," Colaprete said.

This comes as the latest mission to apply brute force to science.

The Deep Impact mission made history in 2005 by sending a probe crashing into comet Tempel 1. Besides Lunar Prospector's grazing strike on the moon in 1999, the European Space Agency's Smart-1 satellite dove more recently into the lunar surface in 2006.

LCROSS will take a much more head-on approach than either Lunar Prospector or Smart-1, slamming into the moon's craters at a steep angle while traveling with greater mass at 1.6 miles per second (2.5 km/s). The overall energy of the impact will equal 100 times that of Lunar Prospector and kick up 1,102 tons of debris and dust.

"It's a cost-effective, relatively low-risk way of doing initial exploration," Colaprete said, comparing the mission's approach to mountain prospectors who used crude sticks of dynamite to blow up gully walls and sift for gold. Scientists are discussing similar missions for exploring asteroids and planets such as Mars.

Nevertheless, Colaprete said they "may want to touch the moon a bit more softly" after LCROSS has its day.

VIDEO: Deep Impact: 'To Poke a Comet'
IMAGES: Poised for Impact
VIDEO: Moon 2.0: Join the Revolution
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:39 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
The first craft has the ability to punch about 25+ feet, the second around 20 feet. unless it's much weaker than they thought, at which point they would punch much further.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:40 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
[link to lcross.arc.nasa.gov]

LCROSS launched recently and is set to "punch" on Oct. 9, '09
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:42 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
Now imagine if the first craft has great success and the surface is much weaker than orignally thought....it can punch all of the way through let say 50-60 feet, and the second craft is free to "probe" inside the moon.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 09:44 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
"Scientists want the impactor spacecraft to hit smooth, flat areas away from large rocks, which would ideally allow the impact plume to rise up out of the crater shadows into sunlight. That in turn lets LRO and Earth-based telescopes see the results.

"By understanding what's in these craters, we're examining a fossil record of the early solar system and would occurred at Earth 3 billion years ago," Colaprete said. LCROSS is currently aiming at target craters Faustini and Shoemaker, which Colaprete likened to "fantastic time capsules" at 3 billion and 3.5 billion years old."

Actually they want the craft to aim for the "thinnest" possible area, the same, the bottom of a crater on the south pole precisely.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 10:03 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
The "gravity" dynamics for bodies forming from a spinning configuration just as easily nets more mass at the surface than at the center. And just as easily makes the "poles" acculmulate an extremely thin wall, while the equators net a very thick wall.
antwan

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07/06/2009 10:19 AM

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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
they are gonna wake somebody up :)

its time to wake up from the long sleep and come and get your food !

Last Edited by antwan on 07/06/2009 10:20 AM
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 10:24 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
This is why the Cassini mission is so recently interested in Enceladus. This particular moon is fairly large but seems to have lost its thin south pole "cap". It's spewing out its insides right now!
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 10:26 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
If they were able to thrust into the south pole of Enceladus like LCROSS to the moon.....there is a good bet they could get "inside" that Saturn moon to explore.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 10:32 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
[link to en.wikipedia.org]

300 MILE diameter = Enceladus, small moon actually.
Skeptic the First
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07/06/2009 11:00 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
This is the 1974 research paper that has Dr. Sean Solomon's famous statement that "the Moon might be hollow":

[link to adsabs.harvard.edu]

Go to page 165, the last page of the conclusion:
---
The Lunar Orbiter experiments vastly improved our knowledge of the Moon's gravitational field, especially considering that the classical value of C/MR2 indicated the frightening possibility that the Moon might be hollow.
---

This could easily give the impression that early, honest measurements did suggest a hollow Moon, so NASA falsified later experiments to "rule out" that possibility.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 11:02 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
There's only one thing left to do then...blow that fucker up!
Skeptic the First
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07/06/2009 11:09 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
This book page alleges that various 1960s scientists, both American and Soviet, confronted the possibility of a hollow and even perhaps artificial Moon:

[link to books.google.com]
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 11:18 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
This is the 1974 research paper that has Dr. Sean Solomon's famous statement that "the Moon might be hollow":

[link to adsabs.harvard.edu]

Go to page 165, the last page of the conclusion:
---
The Lunar Orbiter experiments vastly improved our knowledge of the Moon's gravitational field, especially considering that the classical value of C/MR2 indicated the frightening possibility that the Moon might be hollow.
---

This could easily give the impression that early, honest measurements did suggest a hollow Moon, so NASA falsified later experiments to "rule out" that possibility.
 Quoting: Skeptic the First 718302


Awesome find!
GONG

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07/06/2009 11:20 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
Notice how all craters even the largest ones in diameter are not deep, like if there was a sort of hard shell under the small dirt and rocky surface.
“Skepticism is the easiest way: believe nothing, do nothing.

UFO sightings archives [link to www.v-servers.eu]
Duncan Kunz

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07/06/2009 11:24 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
I am absolutely astounded at the incredible positive correlation here between people who believe such strange and wondrous assertions and a complete ignorance of basic physics and geology (okay, selenology).
Where's the EVIDENCE, Jim?
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 11:28 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
I am absolutely astounded at the incredible positive correlation here between people who believe such strange and wondrous assertions and a complete ignorance of basic physics and geology (okay, selenology).
 Quoting: Duncan Kunz


Duncan knows all...he is the "knower of all things great and small".

Let us all worship the brain of Duncan Kuntz!

Duncan is now "astounded"!.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 11:30 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
If indeed the moon is partially hollow, it's also possible that it is extremely thin-walled at the poles.

As precise "punch" into one of the poles that can go 50 feet or more could net a "puncture".

This very thing will be attempted in October. In fact a "one-two" punch is being attempted in hopes that the second "craft" may explore inside the moon.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 350269

i too think this is the real reason for the moon experiment in october.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 11:33 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
Imagine two semi-circular moon crescents and connect them together at their points...this could be the cross section view of the hollow moon....thick in the middle, very thin at the poles.
Anonymous Coward
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07/06/2009 11:38 AM
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Re: Hollow moon rings like a bell when struck, deathstar?
they are also interested in mars's polar regions, all under the guise of finding water/ice.

tptb know all planets are hollow, that's why they are so interested in the poles.

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