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Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.

 
Sucks
User ID: 763248
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10/18/2009 09:13 PM
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Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
She's had a really bad cough and not been able to breathe well for two weeks now.

Slowly getting worse and now has blood in the other shit she is coughing up.

Going back to the Dr. tomorrow.

Positive thoughts from everyone who cares. It helps.

Thanks. Any Dr's in the house have any ideas?

She's only 30.
Anonymous Coward
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10/18/2009 09:22 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
I just heard from someone who had H1N1 and now has broncitis. I hope your wife is feeling better soon. Coughing up blood can be very serious. Sending healing vibes. hf
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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10/18/2009 09:23 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
I just heard from someone who had H1N1 and now has broncitis. I hope your wife is feeling better soon. Coughing up blood can be very serious. Sending healing vibes. hf
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 362931


Thank you.

Yeah. I too am worried about how serious it is. Trying to relax and not let her know how worried I am. Doctor or ER tomorrow if they don't have the time.

Waited long enough!!!

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 780348
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10/18/2009 09:24 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
She's had a really bad cough and not been able to breathe well for two weeks now.

Slowly getting worse and now has blood in the other shit she is coughing up.

Going back to the Dr. tomorrow.

Positive thoughts from everyone who cares. It helps.

Thanks. Any Dr's in the house have any ideas?

She's only 30.
 Quoting: Sucks 763248


If she's coughing up greenish color mucous she either could have bronchitis or pneumonia, but you didn't mention what color it was. Coughing up blood could be from irritation if she has a lung infection that has gone untreated. Either way, since you mentioned an appoint, its not something to let go any further without being seen. A chest x-ray can help determine what's going on in her lungs.
Aleilius

User ID: 782916
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10/18/2009 09:25 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Could be a blood clot that made it's way into the lungs.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 413833
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10/18/2009 09:26 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
I just heard from someone who had H1N1 and now has broncitis. I hope your wife is feeling better soon. Coughing up blood can be very serious. Sending healing vibes. hf


Thank you.

Yeah. I too am worried about how serious it is. Trying to relax and not let her know how worried I am. Doctor or ER tomorrow if they don't have the time.

Waited long enough!!!

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 763248

I'd be bringing her to the ER stat...to hell with waiting until tomorrow. Coughing up blood is NOT GOOD.
Jesus N Pals

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10/18/2009 09:26 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
go get your shot, hurry
Aleilius

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10/18/2009 09:26 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
I just heard from someone who had H1N1 and now has broncitis. I hope your wife is feeling better soon. Coughing up blood can be very serious. Sending healing vibes. hf


Thank you.

Yeah. I too am worried about how serious it is. Trying to relax and not let her know how worried I am. Doctor or ER tomorrow if they don't have the time.

Waited long enough!!!

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

I'd be bringing her to the ER stat...to hell with waiting until tomorrow. Coughing up blood is NOT GOOD.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 413833

I agree with this.
Anonymous Coward
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10/18/2009 09:29 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Take her to the ER immediately. Coughing up blood isn't something you want to wait until tomorrow.
Kirk

User ID: 749840
United States
10/18/2009 09:29 PM

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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
wouldnt hurt to give D3 20,000 units.
Vitamin C a gram per hour
Worry is a misuse of the imagination.
_Storm_

User ID: 362931
United States
10/18/2009 09:32 PM

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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
I just heard from someone who had H1N1 and now has broncitis. I hope your wife is feeling better soon. Coughing up blood can be very serious. Sending healing vibes. hf


Thank you.

Yeah. I too am worried about how serious it is. Trying to relax and not let her know how worried I am. Doctor or ER tomorrow if they don't have the time.

Waited long enough!!!

Thank you from the bottom of my heart.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 763248



I wanted to come back and say that I agree with the other posters about going to the ER asap. Twelve hours can make a huge difference in this sort of thing.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 797193
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10/18/2009 09:33 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
And for tonites bloody thread........huffy
rachel
User ID: 529732
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10/18/2009 09:36 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
you have been on this thread long enough to have been able to know what to buy for this situation.

people come on already,,,,how many threads that have natural remedies for swine flu????
Greenhorn

User ID: 797282
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10/18/2009 09:39 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
no marathons!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 763248
United States
10/18/2009 09:39 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Thanks so much for the thoughts.

Will do with D3 and Vit C. Have all of that.

Anyone saying rush to ER have medical experience?

Went to the DR a week or a little more back. Said she had a lung infection. I feel pretty certain it's pneumonia.

No health ins.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 797193
United States
10/18/2009 09:44 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Thanks so much for the thoughts.

Will do with D3 and Vit C. Have all of that.

Anyone saying rush to ER have medical experience?

Went to the DR a week or a little more back. Said she had a lung infection. I feel pretty certain it's pneumonia.

No health ins.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 763248

And she was prescribed medication correct?
Kirk

User ID: 749840
United States
10/18/2009 09:45 PM

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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
if this is an established fact some people definitely are in need of a wood shampoo.
I had this crap flu and was glad to have mucinex for my grandson when he got it. Dry coughed until my ribs felt like they were detaching.

Swine Flu Tied To U Of Minn
Bioweapons Program?
Rense.com World Exclusive
10-17-9


Concerned about Swine Flu? Swine flu is actually an upper respiratory disease linked to pneumonia, which is why it is fatal. Just ask the University of Minnesota. They have a research department (with one Dr. Patrick Schlievert, PhD ) designed for 'bio-defense' and paid for by the National Institute of Health (NIH).
According to the WHO, ECDC, CPC, HPA (UK) map, the swine flu started April 21st right there.
Oddly enough, when one goes to the grant-awarding site dictated by the University of Minnesota, the webpage pulls up as "error". As does Dr. Schlievert's bio page which was retrieved elsewhere and appears at the bottom of this page.
Are Dr. Schlievert and the U of Minn bioweapons department tied to the A-H1N1 swine flu pandemic? The doctor's bio/background is remarkable reading.
Here is the map of the spread of swine flu
[link to news.] bbc.co.uk/ 2/hi/uk_news/ 8083179.stm
Did something go 'wrong' at the University of Minnesota's 'Bio-Defense' lab?
The following data is illuminating -
Local Biodefense Research To Begin
Biot Report #54: September 14, 2003
Printer Friendly
Dear SEMP Colleagues:
The National Institutes of Health announced on September 4, 2003 that seven universities would receive large, multiyear grants to conduct defensive research on biological weapons and other infectious agents, and become Regional Centers of Excellence (RCEs) for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research. The awards, totaling $350,000,000 will go to Duke University, Harvard Medical School, the University of Chicago, the University of Maryland at Baltimore, the University of Texas Medical Branch, the University of Washington at Seattle, and Washington University in St. Louis. Each institution will receive an average of about $9 million per year for five years, a significantly larger sum of money than the NIH typically awards to centers for biomedical research. Each of the centers will team up with several nearby academic institutions. An award for an eighth center will go to the New York State Department of Health. In addition, the NIH is giving "planning" grants to the University of Iowa and the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, to help these institutions build the capacity to compete later for full-fledged center award, according to Jeffrey Brainerd in a recent Chronicle of Higher Education story (September 5, 2003; www.chronicle. com).
From [link to www.semp.] us/publications/ biot_reader. php?BiotID= 54
Return to: Academic Health Center : myAHC : U of M Home
One Stop | Directories | Search U of M
Top of Form
Bottom of Form
U awarded $1 million biodefense grant
NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
Contact: Brenda Hudson, Academic Health Center, 612.624..5680
BIODEFENSE AND EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
TARGET OF NIH GRANT TO U OF MN
$1 million planning grant award for Regional Center of Excellence
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (Sept. 4, 2003) -- The United States Department of Health and Human Services today announced the University of Minnesota has been awarded a $1 million Planning Grant for a Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (P-RCE). The grant will be funded and administered by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health.
The University of Minnesota will serve as co-lead institution with The Ohio State University in developing a multi-center collaboration to carry out biodefense research of Category A agents (the most likely serious causes of a biological terrorist attack), including anthrax and tularemia (rabbit fever).
"The planning grant will allow us to initiate research projects, train researchers, and build a team for emergency response,"said University of Minnesota microbiologist and co-lead investigator, Patrick Schlievert, Ph.D. "For instance, we hope to develop new approaches to blocking the action of anthrax and tularemia, both of which affect the respiratory system and can be highly fatal." The P-RCEs will support training, planning, research development, and resource acquisition that we hope will lead to the future establishment of a regional center, he explained.
The Planning Center brings together researchers, both basic and clinical, from the University of Minnesota, The Ohio State University, Indiana University, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Cincinnati, Rush University, Wright State University, the University of Michigan, the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Ohio Department of Public Health, Battelle Memorial Institute, the Columbus Children's Research Institute, Cargill, and 3M.
Eight Regional Centers of Excellence were also established by NIAID today, with grants totaling approximately $350 million over five years, forming a nationwide group of multidisciplinary centers for biodefense research.
end
This page is located at: www.ahc.umn. edu/news/ NewsFiles/ biodefense_ grant090403/
This article found at [link to www.ahc.] umn.edu/index2. cfm?nav=9260&parent=893&type=
F&content_path= news/News_ Files&content_name= U_awarded_ $1_million_
biodefense_grant. htm&pic=General_ faculty-resource s.jpg&gif=News
©2002 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
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News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, Sept. 4, 2003
Contact: NIAID Press Office
(301) 402-1663
HHS ANNOUNCES NEW REGIONAL CENTERS FOR BIODEFENSE RESEARCH
HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson today announced grants totaling approximately $350 million spread over five years to establish eight Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (RCE). This nationwide group of multidisciplinary centers is a key element in HHS' strategic plan for biodefense research.
"We have moved with unprecedented speed and determination to prepare for a bioterror attack or any other public health crisis since the terrorist attacks of 2001," Secretary Thompson said. "These new grants add to this effort and will not only better prepare us for a bioterrorism attack, but will also enhance our ability to deal with any public health crisis, such as SARS and West Nile virus."
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a part of HHS' National Institutes of Health, is providing the grants and will administer the RCE program.
"Since the terrorist attacks on American soil in 2001, NIAID has moved rapidly to bolster basic biomedical research and the development of countermeasures to defend the United States against deliberately released agents of bioterrorism as well as naturally occurring infectious diseases," said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., NIAID director. "The new RCE program provides a coordinated and comprehensive mechanism to support the interdisciplinary research that will lead to new and improved therapies, vaccines, diagnostics and other tools to protect the citizens of our country and the world against the threat of bioterrorism and other emerging and re-emerging diseases."
The RCE program's primary role is to foster the physical and intellectual environments in which wide-ranging research on infectious diseases can proceed productively and safely. All RCEs will:
Support investigator- directed research
Train researchers and other personnel for biodefense research activities
Create and maintain supporting resources, including scientific equipment and trained support personnel, for use by the RCEs and other researchers in the region
Emphasize research focused on development and testing of vaccine, therapeutic and diagnostic concepts
Make available core facilities to approved investigators from academia, government, biotech companies and the pharmaceutical industry
Provide facilities and scientific support to first responders in the event of a national biodefense emergency
Each center comprises a lead institution and affiliated institutions located primarily in the same geographical region. The eight institutions receiving an RCE grant and the principal investigator at each are:
Duke University, Barton Haynes, M.D.
Harvard Medical School, Dennis Kasper, M.D.
New York State Department of Health, Ian Lipkin, M.D.
University of Chicago, Olaf Schneewind, Ph.D.
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Myron Levine, M.D.
University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston), David Walker, M.D.
University of Washington, Samuel Miller, M.D.
Washington University in St. Louis, Samuel Stanley, M.D..
Research to be conducted in the RCE program includes:
Developing new approaches to blocking the action of anthrax, botulinum and cholera toxins
Developing new vaccines against anthrax, plague, tularemia, smallpox and Ebola
Developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies
Studying bacterial and viral disease processes
Designing new advanced diagnostic approaches for biodefense and for emerging diseases
Conducting immunological studies of diseases caused by potential agents of bioterrorism
Developing computational and genomic approaches to combating disease agents
Creating new immunization strategies and delivery systems
In addition to the eight RCEs, NIAID is funding two Planning Grants for Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (P-RCEs). The P-RCEs will support training, planning, research development and resource acquisition that could lead to the future establishment of a regional center. The lead institutions and principal investigators of the P-RCEs are:
University of Iowa, Bradley Britigan, M.D.
University of Minnesota, Patrick Schlievert, Ph.D.
Additional information on NIAID's biodefense program is available at [link to www.niaid.] nih.gov/biodefen se/.
###
Note: All HHS press releases, fact sheets and other press materials are available at [link to www.hhs.] gov/news.
Last Revised: September 4, 2003
HHS Home | Questions? | Contacting HHS | Accessibility | Privacy Policy | FOIA | Disclaimers | The White House | USA.gov | Helping America's Youth
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services - 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. - Washington, D.C. 20201
Here is Dr. Schlievert's bio...
Patrick Schlievert, PhD
Background
Dr. Patrick M. Schlievert is a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Prior to coming to the University of Minnesota as a faculty member in 1980, he was a faculty member at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlievert has over 350 manuscripts published in the area of microbial pathogenesis and management of microbial infections. He has served for many years as a member of numerous NIH Study Sections, most recently as chair of Immunity and Host Defense Study Section.He is a distinguished University of Minnesota Teaching Professor, which is the University's highest honor in teaching, for his teaching of microbiology and immunology to Medical Students. Dr. Schlievert is on the executive board of the Great Lakes Regional Center of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases. He is the recipient of numerous NIH funded grants and has numerous awarded and pending patents
Dr. Schlievert and his clinical colleagues have described 16 newly recognized and emerging bacterial diseases, including characterization of how these diseases occur and how to manage them clinically. For example, he identified the predominant exotoxin cause of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome in 1980, and he and his colleagues were the first to describe streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in 1987, otherwise known as the flesh eating streptococcal disease that killed Muppeteer Jim Henson. Most recently, Dr. Schlievert has been working to develop topical microbicides that interfere with microbial infections originating at the vaginal mucosal surface. He has presented many of his findings over the years to news organizations, including national and international newspapers and magazines and television shows.
Affiliations
University of Minnesota Medical School
Here is his grant...
Pneumonia
NIAID
5R01AI074283- 20
Cardiotoxicity of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxins
SCHLIEVERT, PATRICK
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA TWIN CITIES
MN
$322,294
This information can be found at
[link to report.] nih.gov/rcdc/ categories/ ProjectSearch. aspx?FY=2008&DCat=Pneumonia
____________ _________ _________ ___
1: J Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;200(5):676- 8. Links
Comment on:
J Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;200(5):715- 23.
Cytolysins, superantigens, and pneumonia due to community-associate d methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
Schlievert PM.
PMID: 19653828 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
1: Dig Dis Sci. 2009 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print] Links
Staphylococcal Enterocolitis: Forgotten but Not Gone?
Lin Z, Kotler DP, Schlievert PM, Sordillo EM.
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA.
PURPOSE: Staphylococcus aureus may cause antibiotic-associat ed diarrhea and enterocolitis, with or without preceding antibiotic use, in immunocompromised adults or infants, or individuals with predisposing conditions, but there is little appreciation of this condition clinically. CLINICAL DISEASE: The main clinical feature that helps to differentiate staphylococcal enterocolitis (SEC) from Clostridium difficile-associate d diarrhea is large-volume, cholera-like diarrhea in the former case. A predominance of gram-positive cocci in clusters on gram stain of stool or biopsy specimens and the isolation of S. aureus as the dominant or sole flora support the diagnosis. PATHOGENESIS: The pathogenesis of SEC requires the interaction of staphylococcal enterotoxins, which function as superantigens, with interstitial epithelial lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). MANAGEMENT: Most SEC represents recent S. aureus acquisition, so that improved infection prevention practices can reduce disease recurrence. Management should include aggressive fluid management and repletion and oral vancomycin.
PMID: 19609675 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher
____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
1: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Mar 1;48(5):612- 4. Links
Comment in:
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Aug 15;49(4):646- 7.
Extreme pyrexia and rapid death due to Staphylococcus aureus infection: analysis of 2 cases.
Assimacopoulos AP, Strandberg KL, Rotschafer JH, Schlievert PM.
Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA.
We describe unusual Staphylococcus aureus infections in 2 patients. The infections were characterized by extreme pyrexia and rapid death. Both causative organisms produced a deletion mutant form of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and variant enterotoxin C, which may have caused pyrexia and death.
PMID: 19191649 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
[link to jb.asm.] org/cgi/content/ full/186/ 8/2430?view= long&pmid=15060046
and
[link to web.mit.] edu/ssp/bsl4/ policy.html
and
1: Paediatr Drugs. 2008;10(6):367- 78. doi: 10.2165/0148581- 200810060- 00004. Links
Treatment strategies for methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in pediatrics.
Newland JG, Kearns GL.
Department of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. jnewland1@cmh. edu
Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that frequently causes clinical disease in children. A wide array of illnesses can be caused by this common pathogen ranging from non-invasive skin infections to severe, life-threatening sepsis. Additionally, as antibacterials have been used to eradicate S. aureus, it has developed resistance to these important therapeutic agents. Methicillin- resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become an increasing problem in pediatric patients over the past decade. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment options available in treating MRSA infections in children. Specifically, we address the importance of abscess drainage in the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections, the most common clinical manifestation of MRSA infections, and highlight the various agents that are available for treating this common infection. In severe, life-threatening invasive MRSA infections the primary therapeutic option is vancomycin. In cases of MRSA toxic shock syndrome the addition of clindamycin is necessary. In other invasive MRSA infections, such as pneumonia and musculoskeletal infections, the empiric treatment of choice is clindamycin. Finally, newer agents and additional treatment options are discussed.
PMID: 18998747 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
South Med J. 2009 Feb;102(2):135- 8. Links
____________ _________ _________ _________ _____
Comment in:
South Med J. 2009 Feb;102(2):121- 2.
Community-associate d methicillin- resistant staphylococcal infection in an inner city hospital pediatric inpatient population.
Tejeda-Ramirez E, Behani M, Leggiadro RJ.
Department of Pediatrics, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, NY 10451, USA.
BACKGROUND: Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a serious problem in the community setting, primarily as a cause of skin and soft tissue infections. METHODS: A retrospective study based on the review of pediatric inpatients admitted to Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center from March 2006 to February 2007 was performed. RESULTS: Eighteen (55%) of the thirty-three patients identified were infected with community associated (CA) MRSA. All patients had skin and soft tissue infections. Seventeen (94%) of eighteen CA-MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline, respectively, and eleven (61%) were susceptible to levofloxacin. CONCLUSIONS: Skin and soft tissue infections are the most common clinical manifestation of CA-MRSA in our population. The 55% prevalence of MRSA in our patients suggests reconsidering empirical antimicrobial choices. Surgical intervention is important in the management of these infections, and clindamycin resistance among CA-MRSA isolates should be monitored locally to determine if empiric therapy is appropriate.
PMID: 19139709 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

[link to www.rense.] com/general88/ bio.htm
Worry is a misuse of the imagination.
Tracy
User ID: 662749
Australia
10/18/2009 09:46 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Just get her to the ER NOW you fool...pneumonia is deadly if not treated fast. She could also have lung cancer.....that is not just for the old and smokers you know.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 797193
United States
10/18/2009 09:49 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
if this is an established fact some people definitely are in need of a wood shampoo.
I had this crap flu and was glad to have mucinex for my grandson when he got it. Dry coughed until my ribs felt like they were detaching.

Swine Flu Tied To U Of Minn
Bioweapons Program?
Rense.com World Exclusive
10-17-9


Concerned about Swine Flu? Swine flu is actually an upper respiratory disease linked to pneumonia, which is why it is fatal. Just ask the University of Minnesota. They have a research department (with one Dr. Patrick Schlievert, PhD ) designed for 'bio-defense' and paid for by the National Institute of Health (NIH).
According to the WHO, ECDC, CPC, HPA (UK) map, the swine flu started April 21st right there.
Oddly enough, when one goes to the grant-awarding site dictated by the University of Minnesota, the webpage pulls up as "error". As does Dr. Schlievert's bio page which was retrieved elsewhere and appears at the bottom of this page.
Are Dr. Schlievert and the U of Minn bioweapons department tied to the A-H1N1 swine flu pandemic? The doctor's bio/background is remarkable reading.
Here is the map of the spread of swine flu
[link to news.] bbc.co.uk/ 2/hi/uk_news/ 8083179.stm
Did something go 'wrong' at the University of Minnesota's 'Bio-Defense' lab?
The following data is illuminating -
Local Biodefense Research To Begin
Biot Report #54: September 14, 2003
Printer Friendly
Dear SEMP Colleagues:
The National Institutes of Health announced on September 4, 2003 that seven universities would receive large, multiyear grants to conduct defensive research on biological weapons and other infectious agents, and become Regional Centers of Excellence (RCEs) for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research. The awards, totaling $350,000,000 will go to Duke University, Harvard Medical School, the University of Chicago, the University of Maryland at Baltimore, the University of Texas Medical Branch, the University of Washington at Seattle, and Washington University in St. Louis. Each institution will receive an average of about $9 million per year for five years, a significantly larger sum of money than the NIH typically awards to centers for biomedical research. Each of the centers will team up with several nearby academic institutions. An award for an eighth center will go to the New York State Department of Health. In addition, the NIH is giving "planning" grants to the University of Iowa and the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, to help these institutions build the capacity to compete later for full-fledged center award, according to Jeffrey Brainerd in a recent Chronicle of Higher Education story (September 5, 2003; www.chronicle. com).
From [link to www.semp.] us/publications/ biot_reader. php?BiotID= 54
Return to: Academic Health Center : myAHC : U of M Home
One Stop | Directories | Search U of M
Top of Form
Bottom of Form
U awarded $1 million biodefense grant
NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
Contact: Brenda Hudson, Academic Health Center, 612.624..5680
BIODEFENSE AND EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
TARGET OF NIH GRANT TO U OF MN
$1 million planning grant award for Regional Center of Excellence
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (Sept. 4, 2003) -- The United States Department of Health and Human Services today announced the University of Minnesota has been awarded a $1 million Planning Grant for a Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (P-RCE). The grant will be funded and administered by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health.
The University of Minnesota will serve as co-lead institution with The Ohio State University in developing a multi-center collaboration to carry out biodefense research of Category A agents (the most likely serious causes of a biological terrorist attack), including anthrax and tularemia (rabbit fever).
"The planning grant will allow us to initiate research projects, train researchers, and build a team for emergency response,"said University of Minnesota microbiologist and co-lead investigator, Patrick Schlievert, Ph.D. "For instance, we hope to develop new approaches to blocking the action of anthrax and tularemia, both of which affect the respiratory system and can be highly fatal." The P-RCEs will support training, planning, research development, and resource acquisition that we hope will lead to the future establishment of a regional center, he explained.
The Planning Center brings together researchers, both basic and clinical, from the University of Minnesota, The Ohio State University, Indiana University, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Cincinnati, Rush University, Wright State University, the University of Michigan, the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Ohio Department of Public Health, Battelle Memorial Institute, the Columbus Children's Research Institute, Cargill, and 3M.
Eight Regional Centers of Excellence were also established by NIAID today, with grants totaling approximately $350 million over five years, forming a nationwide group of multidisciplinary centers for biodefense research.
end
This page is located at: www.ahc.umn. edu/news/ NewsFiles/ biodefense_ grant090403/
This article found at [link to www.ahc.] umn.edu/index2. cfm?nav=9260&parent=893&type=
F&content_path= news/News_ Files&content_name= U_awarded_ $1_million_
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News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, Sept. 4, 2003
Contact: NIAID Press Office
(301) 402-1663
HHS ANNOUNCES NEW REGIONAL CENTERS FOR BIODEFENSE RESEARCH
HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson today announced grants totaling approximately $350 million spread over five years to establish eight Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (RCE). This nationwide group of multidisciplinary centers is a key element in HHS' strategic plan for biodefense research.
"We have moved with unprecedented speed and determination to prepare for a bioterror attack or any other public health crisis since the terrorist attacks of 2001," Secretary Thompson said. "These new grants add to this effort and will not only better prepare us for a bioterrorism attack, but will also enhance our ability to deal with any public health crisis, such as SARS and West Nile virus."
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a part of HHS' National Institutes of Health, is providing the grants and will administer the RCE program.
"Since the terrorist attacks on American soil in 2001, NIAID has moved rapidly to bolster basic biomedical research and the development of countermeasures to defend the United States against deliberately released agents of bioterrorism as well as naturally occurring infectious diseases," said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., NIAID director. "The new RCE program provides a coordinated and comprehensive mechanism to support the interdisciplinary research that will lead to new and improved therapies, vaccines, diagnostics and other tools to protect the citizens of our country and the world against the threat of bioterrorism and other emerging and re-emerging diseases."
The RCE program's primary role is to foster the physical and intellectual environments in which wide-ranging research on infectious diseases can proceed productively and safely. All RCEs will:
Support investigator- directed research
Train researchers and other personnel for biodefense research activities
Create and maintain supporting resources, including scientific equipment and trained support personnel, for use by the RCEs and other researchers in the region
Emphasize research focused on development and testing of vaccine, therapeutic and diagnostic concepts
Make available core facilities to approved investigators from academia, government, biotech companies and the pharmaceutical industry
Provide facilities and scientific support to first responders in the event of a national biodefense emergency
Each center comprises a lead institution and affiliated institutions located primarily in the same geographical region. The eight institutions receiving an RCE grant and the principal investigator at each are:
Duke University, Barton Haynes, M.D.
Harvard Medical School, Dennis Kasper, M.D.
New York State Department of Health, Ian Lipkin, M.D.
University of Chicago, Olaf Schneewind, Ph.D.
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Myron Levine, M.D.
University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston), David Walker, M.D.
University of Washington, Samuel Miller, M.D.
Washington University in St. Louis, Samuel Stanley, M.D..
Research to be conducted in the RCE program includes:
Developing new approaches to blocking the action of anthrax, botulinum and cholera toxins
Developing new vaccines against anthrax, plague, tularemia, smallpox and Ebola
Developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies
Studying bacterial and viral disease processes
Designing new advanced diagnostic approaches for biodefense and for emerging diseases
Conducting immunological studies of diseases caused by potential agents of bioterrorism
Developing computational and genomic approaches to combating disease agents
Creating new immunization strategies and delivery systems
In addition to the eight RCEs, NIAID is funding two Planning Grants for Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (P-RCEs). The P-RCEs will support training, planning, research development and resource acquisition that could lead to the future establishment of a regional center. The lead institutions and principal investigators of the P-RCEs are:
University of Iowa, Bradley Britigan, M.D.
University of Minnesota, Patrick Schlievert, Ph.D.
Additional information on NIAID's biodefense program is available at [link to www.niaid.] nih.gov/biodefen se/.
###
Note: All HHS press releases, fact sheets and other press materials are available at [link to www.hhs.] gov/news.
Last Revised: September 4, 2003
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Here is Dr. Schlievert's bio...
Patrick Schlievert, PhD
Background
Dr. Patrick M. Schlievert is a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Prior to coming to the University of Minnesota as a faculty member in 1980, he was a faculty member at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlievert has over 350 manuscripts published in the area of microbial pathogenesis and management of microbial infections. He has served for many years as a member of numerous NIH Study Sections, most recently as chair of Immunity and Host Defense Study Section.He is a distinguished University of Minnesota Teaching Professor, which is the University's highest honor in teaching, for his teaching of microbiology and immunology to Medical Students. Dr. Schlievert is on the executive board of the Great Lakes Regional Center of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases. He is the recipient of numerous NIH funded grants and has numerous awarded and pending patents
Dr. Schlievert and his clinical colleagues have described 16 newly recognized and emerging bacterial diseases, including characterization of how these diseases occur and how to manage them clinically. For example, he identified the predominant exotoxin cause of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome in 1980, and he and his colleagues were the first to describe streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in 1987, otherwise known as the flesh eating streptococcal disease that killed Muppeteer Jim Henson. Most recently, Dr. Schlievert has been working to develop topical microbicides that interfere with microbial infections originating at the vaginal mucosal surface. He has presented many of his findings over the years to news organizations, including national and international newspapers and magazines and television shows.
Affiliations
University of Minnesota Medical School
Here is his grant...
Pneumonia
NIAID
5R01AI074283- 20
Cardiotoxicity of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxins
SCHLIEVERT, PATRICK
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA TWIN CITIES
MN
$322,294
This information can be found at
[link to report.] nih.gov/rcdc/ categories/ ProjectSearch. aspx?FY=2008&DCat=Pneumonia
____________ _________ _________ ___
1: J Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;200(5):676- 8. Links
Comment on:
J Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;200(5):715- 23.
Cytolysins, superantigens, and pneumonia due to community-associate d methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
Schlievert PM.
PMID: 19653828 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
1: Dig Dis Sci. 2009 Jul 16. [Epub ahead of print] Links
Staphylococcal Enterocolitis: Forgotten but Not Gone?
Lin Z, Kotler DP, Schlievert PM, Sordillo EM.
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA.
PURPOSE: Staphylococcus aureus may cause antibiotic-associat ed diarrhea and enterocolitis, with or without preceding antibiotic use, in immunocompromised adults or infants, or individuals with predisposing conditions, but there is little appreciation of this condition clinically. CLINICAL DISEASE: The main clinical feature that helps to differentiate staphylococcal enterocolitis (SEC) from Clostridium difficile-associate d diarrhea is large-volume, cholera-like diarrhea in the former case. A predominance of gram-positive cocci in clusters on gram stain of stool or biopsy specimens and the isolation of S. aureus as the dominant or sole flora support the diagnosis. PATHOGENESIS: The pathogenesis of SEC requires the interaction of staphylococcal enterotoxins, which function as superantigens, with interstitial epithelial lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). MANAGEMENT: Most SEC represents recent S. aureus acquisition, so that improved infection prevention practices can reduce disease recurrence. Management should include aggressive fluid management and repletion and oral vancomycin.
PMID: 19609675 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher
____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
1: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Mar 1;48(5):612- 4. Links
Comment in:
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Aug 15;49(4):646- 7.
Extreme pyrexia and rapid death due to Staphylococcus aureus infection: analysis of 2 cases.
Assimacopoulos AP, Strandberg KL, Rotschafer JH, Schlievert PM.
Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA.
We describe unusual Staphylococcus aureus infections in 2 patients. The infections were characterized by extreme pyrexia and rapid death. Both causative organisms produced a deletion mutant form of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and variant enterotoxin C, which may have caused pyrexia and death.
PMID: 19191649 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
[link to jb.asm.] org/cgi/content/ full/186/ 8/2430?view= long&pmid=15060046
and
[link to web.mit.] edu/ssp/bsl4/ policy.html
and
1: Paediatr Drugs. 2008;10(6):367- 78. doi: 10.2165/0148581- 200810060- 00004. Links
Treatment strategies for methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in pediatrics.
Newland JG, Kearns GL.
Department of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. jnewland1@cmh. edu
Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that frequently causes clinical disease in children. A wide array of illnesses can be caused by this common pathogen ranging from non-invasive skin infections to severe, life-threatening sepsis. Additionally, as antibacterials have been used to eradicate S. aureus, it has developed resistance to these important therapeutic agents. Methicillin- resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become an increasing problem in pediatric patients over the past decade. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment options available in treating MRSA infections in children. Specifically, we address the importance of abscess drainage in the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections, the most common clinical manifestation of MRSA infections, and highlight the various agents that are available for treating this common infection. In severe, life-threatening invasive MRSA infections the primary therapeutic option is vancomycin. In cases of MRSA toxic shock syndrome the addition of clindamycin is necessary. In other invasive MRSA infections, such as pneumonia and musculoskeletal infections, the empiric treatment of choice is clindamycin. Finally, newer agents and additional treatment options are discussed.
PMID: 18998747 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
South Med J. 2009 Feb;102(2):135- 8. Links
____________ _________ _________ _________ _____
Comment in:
South Med J. 2009 Feb;102(2):121- 2.
Community-associate d methicillin- resistant staphylococcal infection in an inner city hospital pediatric inpatient population.
Tejeda-Ramirez E, Behani M, Leggiadro RJ.
Department of Pediatrics, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, NY 10451, USA.
BACKGROUND: Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a serious problem in the community setting, primarily as a cause of skin and soft tissue infections. METHODS: A retrospective study based on the review of pediatric inpatients admitted to Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center from March 2006 to February 2007 was performed. RESULTS: Eighteen (55%) of the thirty-three patients identified were infected with community associated (CA) MRSA. All patients had skin and soft tissue infections. Seventeen (94%) of eighteen CA-MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline, respectively, and eleven (61%) were susceptible to levofloxacin. CONCLUSIONS: Skin and soft tissue infections are the most common clinical manifestation of CA-MRSA in our population. The 55% prevalence of MRSA in our patients suggests reconsidering empirical antimicrobial choices. Surgical intervention is important in the management of these infections, and clindamycin resistance among CA-MRSA isolates should be monitored locally to determine if empiric therapy is appropriate.
PMID: 19139709 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

[link to www.rense.] com/general88/ bio.htm
 Quoting: Kirk

Now THIS is a "wall o text" stoned
TXGal4Truth

User ID: 764507
United States
10/18/2009 09:51 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
I agree with what others on here are saying...to the hospital ASAP...Prayers sent...
So have I now become your enemy for telling you the TRUTH? Galatians 4:16
************************************
“Gravity explains the motions of the planets, but it cannot explain who sets the planets in motion.” ~Isaac Newton
************************************
We are called to be BOLD. ~Joshua 1:9~
************************************
You call me paranoid. I call you uninformed.

:tgdmwt:
Tracy
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10/18/2009 09:51 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Coughing up blood
Coughing up blood is the spitting up of blood or bloody mucus from the lungs and throat (respiratory tract).

Hemoptysis is the medical term for coughing up blood from the respiratory tract.

Considerations
Coughing up blood is not the same as bleeding from the mouth, throat, or gastrointestinal tract.

Blood that comes up with a cough often looks bubbly because it is mixed with air and mucus. It is usually bright red, although it may be rust-colored. Sometimes the mucus may only contain streaks of blood.

Causes
A number of conditions, diseases, and medical tests may make you cough up blood.

Diseases and conditions may include:

Blood clot in the lung
Bronchiectasis
Bronchitis
Cancer
Cystic fibrosis
Goodpasture's syndrome
Inflammation of the blood vessels in the lung (vasculitis)
Inhaling blood into the lungs (pulmonary aspiration)
Irritation of the throat from violent coughing
Nosebleed that drips blood down into the lungs
Laryngitis
Pneumonia
Pulmonary edema
Systemic lupus erythematosus
Tuberculosis
Diagnostic tests that can make you cough up blood include:

Bronchoscopy
Laryngoscopy
Lung biopsy
Mediastinoscopy
Spirometry
Tonsillectomy
Upper airway biopsy
Home Care
Cough suppressants may help if this condition is due to throat irritation from violent coughing. However, cough suppressants may lead to airways obstruction in some cases. Always check with your doctor before using them.

It is very important to note how long you cough up blood, and how much blood is mixed with the mucus.

Also look out for these signs of severe blood loss:

Dizziness
Light-headedness
Thirst
Other symptoms:

Blood in the urine
Chest pain
Fever
Shortness of breath
When to Contact a Medical Professional
If you have any unexplained coughing up of blood, call an ambulance or go to the nearest emergency department. This is very important if your cough produces large volumes of blood (more than a few teaspoons), or if you also have:

Dizziness
Light-headedness
Severe shortness of breath
What to Expect at Your Office Visit
In an emergency case, your doctor will give you treatments to control your condition. The doctor will then ask you questions about your cough such as:

Type
Are you coughing up large amounts of blood (massive hemoptysis)?
Can you see blood when you cough up something?
How many times have you coughed up blood?
Is there blood-streaked mucus (phlegm)?
Time pattern
Did it begin suddenly?
Has it increased recently?
How many weeks has the cough lasted?
Is the cough worse at night?
What other symptoms do you have?
The doctor will do a complete physical exam and check your chest and lungs. Tests that may be done include:

Bronchoscopy
Chest CT scan
Chest x-ray
Coagulation studies, such as PT or PTT
Complete blood count
Lung biopsy
Lung scan
Pulmonary arteriography
Sputum culture and smear
Alternative Names
Hemoptysis; Spitting up blood; Bloody sputum

[link to www.nlm.nih.gov]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 797193
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10/18/2009 09:53 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
OPs yanking everyones chain.....It was bloody stools last time huffy
rachel
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10/18/2009 09:57 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
i gargled with yarrow glycerin tincture as soon as i got this thing. i made it go away so fast with all the recomended natural remedies that im not even sure it was swine flu. worst cough sickness my bf and i had. he was reluctant to take all the stuff i did and his lasted way longer, he did take the yarrow here and there

that stops bleeding lungs

wow this is bad
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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10/18/2009 10:07 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
OPs yanking everyones chain.....It was bloody stools last time huffy
 Quoting: RememberThis


LOL Thanks for making me laugh. I promise I wouldn't do that about this. I really, really appreciate everyones help!!
VestanPance

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United Kingdom
10/18/2009 10:07 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
She's had a really bad cough and not been able to breathe well for two weeks now.

Slowly getting worse and now has blood in the other shit she is coughing up.

Going back to the Dr. tomorrow.

Positive thoughts from everyone who cares. It helps.

Thanks. Any Dr's in the house have any ideas?

She's only 30.
 Quoting: Sucks 763248

Bullshit, pictures or it didnt happen.

If it did, your so dense that even light bends around you. Coughing up blood needs to be checked out ASAP. Fuck all the Vitamin suggestion bullshit.
Cheers.
-----------------------------
"Shit, if this is gonna be that kind of party, I'm going to stick my dick in the mashed potatoes."

"The gene pool is stagnant and I am the minister of chlorine"

"What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence"
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 763248
United States
10/18/2009 10:08 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
i gargled with yarrow glycerin tincture as soon as i got this thing. i made it go away so fast with all the recomended natural remedies that im not even sure it was swine flu. worst cough sickness my bf and i had. he was reluctant to take all the stuff i did and his lasted way longer, he did take the yarrow here and there

that stops bleeding lungs

wow this is bad
 Quoting: rachel 529732


???? Where would we be able to pick this up?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 797355
United States
10/18/2009 10:09 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
She's had a really bad cough and not been able to breathe well for two weeks now.

Slowly getting worse and now has blood in the other shit she is coughing up.

Going back to the Dr. tomorrow.

Positive thoughts from everyone who cares. It helps.

Thanks. Any Dr's in the house have any ideas?

She's only 30.

Bullshit, pictures or it didnt happen.

If it did, your so dense that even light bends around you. Coughing up blood needs to be checked out ASAP. Fuck all the Vitamin suggestion bullshit.
 Quoting: VestanPance


"your so dense"?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 763248
United States
10/18/2009 10:09 PM
Report Abusive Post
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
She's had a really bad cough and not been able to breathe well for two weeks now.

Slowly getting worse and now has blood in the other shit she is coughing up.

Going back to the Dr. tomorrow.

Positive thoughts from everyone who cares. It helps.

Thanks. Any Dr's in the house have any ideas?

She's only 30.

Bullshit, pictures or it didnt happen.

If it did, your so dense that even light bends around you. Coughing up blood needs to be checked out ASAP. Fuck all the Vitamin suggestion bullshit.
 Quoting: VestanPance


Go fuck yourself. I'm not taking fucking pictures. You're a fucking asshole and will be sorry you said this shit when karma comes.

Fuck you. Piece of shit.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 794076
United States
10/18/2009 10:09 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Apply for life insurance asap... fuck that hospital / doctor bullshit or they might not issue it.
VestanPance

User ID: 779908
United Kingdom
10/18/2009 10:10 PM
Report Abusive Post
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
She's had a really bad cough and not been able to breathe well for two weeks now.

Slowly getting worse and now has blood in the other shit she is coughing up.

Going back to the Dr. tomorrow.

Positive thoughts from everyone who cares. It helps.

Thanks. Any Dr's in the house have any ideas?

She's only 30.

Bullshit, pictures or it didnt happen.

If it did, your so dense that even light bends around you. Coughing up blood needs to be checked out ASAP. Fuck all the Vitamin suggestion bullshit.


Go fuck yourself. I'm not taking fucking pictures. You're a fucking asshole and will be sorry you said this shit when karma comes.

Fuck you. Piece of shit.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 763248

TAKE HER TO ER YOU FUCKING PRICK!!! Instead of slagging me off.
Cheers.
-----------------------------
"Shit, if this is gonna be that kind of party, I'm going to stick my dick in the mashed potatoes."

"The gene pool is stagnant and I am the minister of chlorine"

"What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence"
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 763248
United States
10/18/2009 10:10 PM
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Re: Wife coughing up blood. Think it's H1N1.
Sorry for the last responce to everyone who has been so helpful and caring. She means the world to me.

Reading it all over now.

News