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The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!

 
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 08:32 PM
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The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Now, I don't have that many canned goods for my survival/hard times pantry, so this year I thought I'd stock up on a couple of canned foods on seasonal sales.

I found a lot of canned pumpkin sales this week, $1.37 per 15 oz can of Libby's canned Pumpkin at Wal-mart and $1.99 per 15 oz can of organic canned pumpkin at my co-op.

I bought two cases of the organic canned pumpkin.

Why 2 cases of canned pumpkin, you may ask?

Pumpkin is an anti-oxidant packed fruit with anti-aging and disease fighting benefits. It contains alpha-carotenes, beta-carotenes, vitamins E & C, pantothenic acid, fiber, potassium & magnesium. [link to food-facts.suite101.com]

Canned pumpkin recipes are also incredibly easy and fast.

After trying these easy, super nutritious recipes, I think that canned pumpkin is a definite win to stock a couple of cases for my survival/hard times pantry.

I also picked up a case of whole berry cranberry sauce. That stuff is really good mixed in plain yogurt with orange juice and it's another great anti-oxidant-packed fruit that comes inexpensively canned on sale this time of the year. I don't like sweet jams and preserves, so cranberry sauce is a great low-cost health food for my hard times pantry.
_____________________

Pumpkin Soup with Smoked Paprika Recipe

* 1 15 oz can pumpkin puree
* 1 small red onion, minced**
* 1 garlic clove, minced**
* 1 tsp smoked paprika
* 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
* 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
* 1-1/3 cup chicken broth
* 3/4 cup milk
* Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients and bring to a boil, simmer briefly and then serve hot.

** I actually kept out the onion and garlic until it was done cooking and cooled slightly, because I like to eat raw onions and garlic for health reasons, and this worked great in this soup. The soup was definitely not too strong for raw garlic, and my husband happily had 2 cups of it, even though he'd never tasted a pumpkin soup before.

Thai-spiced Pumpkin Coconut Soup Recipe

2 15 oz cans pumpkin puree
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
1 14-ounce can coconut milk
1 teaspoon (or more) red Thai curry paste
water
2 teaspoons fine grain sea salt (or to taste)

Combine all ingredients and bring to a boil, simmer for a few minutes and then serve hot. Chicken broth may be used to thin, if too thick.
malu

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11/22/2009 08:36 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
have you ever actually eaten pumpkin soup?


anywho, most all winter squashes are of the same make up, acorns, butternuts, etc.
i have stored them for up to four months as picked, just dip the stem in bleach , to prevent bacteria working its way in, and keep in a cool dry place

sweet potatoes also store very well and are just as healthy
"By way of deception, thou shalt do war."

Israel's Mossad

"The truth shall set you free."

U.S. Central Intelligence Agency Motto
htp,nli
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11/22/2009 08:41 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
I absolutely love soups made from the various squashes. Mild,(some would say bland) nutty, with a hint of sweetness, and beautiful colors to swirl in some sour creme or plain yogurt. Mmmmm!
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 08:41 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
They say there is a shortage of pumpkin, so you got lucky! There are still plenty of field pumpkins around here at roadside stands...I usually cook it down and puree it and freeze it, but here is how to can it
[link to www.pickyourown.org]

I have had pumpkin soup, but no one else in my family will eat it! I do use small chunks in vegetable soup though, and we all like one that is a white bean soup with chunks of orange veg (pumpkin, winter squash, or sweet potato), so there are lots of ways to use it up.

also, pumpkin butter, pumpkin bread, pumpkin custard, etc.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 08:41 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Oh yes, I tried a couple of pumpkin soup recipes, they are absolutely delicious and fast.

I'm also eating fresh squash and pumpkin. Obviously, those are better to eat when in season. And sweet potato is available fresh year round.

The canned food is just for survival/hard times supplies. However, since I will eventually eat it, I'm looking for super nutritious, useful canned foods that I have no problem eating. I don't like many canned foods, but this one is a winner.
htp,nli
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11/22/2009 08:44 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Both of those recipes look great, OP. I have never heard of smoked paprika, nor have I noticed it on the spice racks at the grocery store. Where might one find it?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 08:44 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
I absolutely love soups made from the various squashes. Mild,(some would say bland) nutty, with a hint of sweetness, and beautiful colors to swirl in some sour creme or plain yogurt. Mmmmm!
 Quoting: htp,nli 686272


I also love nut milks -- milks you make from blending raw nuts with water. I think hazelnut or almond nut milk would make a great pumpkin soup, too. There's that nuttiness of pumpkin that is so easy to bring out!

(Nuts are another great survival food since nuts store easily and make a great milk in a pinch!)
malu

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11/22/2009 08:44 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
with that thought in mind, these are the foods you should build your supply around:

* Beans
* Blueberries
* Broccoli
* Oats
* Oranges
* Pumpkin
* Salmon
* Soy
* Spinach
* Tea (green or black)
* Tomatoes
* Turkey
* Walnuts
* Yogurt
"By way of deception, thou shalt do war."

Israel's Mossad

"The truth shall set you free."

U.S. Central Intelligence Agency Motto
htp,nli
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11/22/2009 08:46 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
We had roasted butternut for supper this evening. Delicious. A little butter. No need for any sweetener.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 08:48 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Both of those recipes look great, OP. I have never heard of smoked paprika, nor have I noticed it on the spice racks at the grocery store. Where might one find it?
 Quoting: htp,nli 686272



McCormick came out with it a couple of years ago, so I got mine off the grocery store shelf. I think it can be ordered more cheaply online [link to www.google.com]

It's really awesome on homemade popcorn, if you make your own popcorn. I use half and half nutritional yeast and smoked spanish paprika on popcorn I pop in the microwave with some olive oil and sea salt.

I also used it in a spicy steamed Mussels with tomatoes dish, the smoked paprika and some red pepper really brought out the flavors!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 08:50 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
We had roasted butternut for supper this evening. Delicious. A little butter. No need for any sweetener.
 Quoting: htp,nli 686272


Roasted fresh butternut squash is to die for! IMO the bestest is the simplest with that one.
htp,nli
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11/22/2009 08:51 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Hey Malu,

I like your list. I have to avoid soy for health reasons. But the rest looks good. I also by canned mackerel, which is cheaper than salmon, but makes great salad/spread. Little strong for some folks, I spose, but I like it.
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 08:52 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Both of those recipes look great, OP. I have never heard of smoked paprika, nor have I noticed it on the spice racks at the grocery store. Where might one find it?
 Quoting: htp,nli 686272


Also, a great source for good quality, affordable spices is Penzey's

[link to www.penzeys.com]

OP - there is a great carrot/cashew soup recipe in the Moosewood cookbook. I bet you could substitute pumpkin for the carrots. My kids do eat that one!
htp,nli
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11/22/2009 08:53 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
That smoked paprika sounds like it would be very tasty on roasted pumpkin/squash seeds - another of my favorite foods. I always roast the seeds right along with the squash, separate pan, various seasonings. Chomp, chomp.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 08:57 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
with that thought in mind, these are the foods you should build your supply around:

* Beans
* Blueberries
* Broccoli
* Oats
* Oranges
* Pumpkin
* Salmon
* Soy
* Spinach
* Tea (green or black)
* Tomatoes
* Turkey
* Walnuts
* Yogurt
 Quoting: malu


Thanks for the advice -- I do have a big deficit in my veggie planning.

I definitely don't have anything in the way of broccoli or spinach or other greens. I don't have oranges, but am going to try to dehydrate some fruits.

I do have sprout kits, for making arugula, broccoli and spinach sprouts. But I can't really rely on just those. How much sprouts can you eat every day?
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 08:58 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
That smoked paprika sounds like it would be very tasty on roasted pumpkin/squash seeds - another of my favorite foods. I always roast the seeds right along with the squash, separate pan, various seasonings. Chomp, chomp.
 Quoting: htp,nli 686272


OMG it didn't occur to me to put them in the oven with the roasting squash. I always saved them but never roasted them, eventually throwing them away.

Thanks for the idea.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 09:04 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
They say there is a shortage of pumpkin, so you got lucky! There are still plenty of field pumpkins around here at roadside stands...I usually cook it down and puree it and freeze it, but here is how to can it
[link to www.pickyourown.org]

I have had pumpkin soup, but no one else in my family will eat it! I do use small chunks in vegetable soup though, and we all like one that is a white bean soup with chunks of orange veg (pumpkin, winter squash, or sweet potato), so there are lots of ways to use it up.

also, pumpkin butter, pumpkin bread, pumpkin custard, etc.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 781169


This is another great reason to get a pressure cooker... the white bean soup sounds like a great idea.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 09:12 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Here are some more ideas for choosing healthy canned foods to add to your survival/hard times pantry.

Nutrition for Runners: 10 canned foods runners should have
Canned foods are healthier and tastier than you might think. These 10 should be in every runner's pantry.
By Liz Applegate Ph.D.
[link to www.runnersworld.com]

New and improved canning methods now allow fruits, vegetables, beans, seafood, and meats to retain their flavors and nutritional punch...

And you can't beat canned foods for convenience--with the new pop-top lids, you don't even need a can opener. In minutes, you can pull together a great-tasting, performance-boosting meal that's loaded with carbohydrates, protein, essential fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Of course, some canned foods are better than others, which is why it's always important to check labels for added sodium or preservatives. Nutritionist Kristine Clark, Ph.D., R.D., from Penn State University, and I recently compared the canned foods we each regularly stock in our cupboards. The following 10 are the must-haves for runners.

1. Salmon: Sorry, Charlie. Salmon is the king of the sea when it comes to canned fish. That's because each 3-ounce serving provides almost 2 grams of omega-3 fats. According to numerous studies, these fats help ward off everything from heart disease and cancer to Alzheimer's and depression.

A serving of salmon also packs about 35 percent of the Daily Value (DV) for muscle-building protein, along with a good dose of bone-building calcium (from the small fish bones). Use canned salmon as you would tuna--as a sandwich filling, mixed into salads and casseroles, or rolled up with chopped cilantro and shredded red cabbage for a great wrap.

2. Beef chili: On a cold night, you can't beat a hearty bowl of chili. And canned chili can be a runner's dream meal. Check the labels, and you'll see that many brands are low in fat and offer a hefty dose of protein--almost half the DV in a 1-cup serving. The beans also mean chili is full of runner-friendly carbohydrates and fiber (more than 20 percent of the DV). What's more, a serving also provides about 20 percent of the DV for vitamin A and iron. We're talking mighty nutrition in a can. Pop open a can of chili and serve with a fruit salad, and you're set for the evening.

3. Pumpkin: Spotting the perfect pumpkin in the patch is certainly more fun than pulling a can off the shelf. But if you think that fresh pumpkin is a better nutritional deal, think again. Canned pumpkin packs 10 times the beta-carotene (which is converted to vitamin A in the body) as fresh because of its lower water content. So a half-cup serving of canned pumpkin supplies a staggering 300 percent of the DV for vitamin A from beta-carotene. Carotenoids such as beta-carotene act as antioxidants that protect you from cancer, heart disease, and other age-related conditions. Use canned pumpkin in pies, muffins, quick breads, or puddings. You can also top it with a drizzle of honey and sprinkle of cinnamon, heat in the microwave for a minute, and sit down to a great dessert.

4. Minestrone soup: Some homemade versions of this Italian soup may be tastier than canned versions (I hope my grandma heard that), but ready-made minestrone soup still provides great nutrition. A 1-cup serving supplies 20 percent of the DV for fiber, a good dose of protein, and plenty of vitamin A and iron in only 120 calories. The variety of beans and vegetables in this soup also means you're getting an array of health-boosting phytochemicals with every bowl. Serve with a piece of whole-grain bread, and you have a nutritious postrun meal.

5. Chicken: Sure, you've heard of chicken in a basket, but chicken in a can? Every runner needs to know about this protein powerhouse. Pop the lid on this precooked meat, and you get pure unadulterated protein--something many runners fall short on by habitually noshing on snacks high in carbohydrates. In a 3-ounce serving, you get 15 grams of high-quality protein and a speck of fat in only 70 calories. Add to soups, toss into salads, roll up in a burrito, layer into casseroles, or eat straight out of the can.

6. Peaches: It doesn't have to be summer for you to enjoy a juicy peach. Packed with natural flavors, canned peaches are fresher tasting and better for you than ever. Just check the label and select peaches packed in light syrup or fruit juice rather than heavy syrup to avoid excess sugar calories. Some varieties also come fortified with 100 percent of the DV for vitamin C. Slice canned peaches over your hot or cold cereal, on cottage cheese, in salads, or blend with some frozen berries and yogurt for summertime smoothies year-round.

7. Nuts: There was a time when people only broke out the canned nuts for cocktail parties. Not anymore. The research is in, and it shows that eating nuts regularly cuts heart-disease risk. It's the combination of the heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and immunity-enhancing phytochemicals found in most nuts that make them a smart snack. Nuts are also a great source of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant that may help lessen the oxidative damage caused by heavy exercise. Top your cereal or salad with canned chopped nuts, sprinkle over frozen yogurt (drizzled with canned chocolate syrup!), or add to casseroles or trail mix.

8. Clams: A reliable source of protein and zinc, which are both crucial for a healthy immune system, you should always keep a couple cans of clams in your cupboard (try to say that 10 times fast). Clams also supply more than half the DV for iron, a mineral you may lack if you avoid red meat. And here's a little-known fact: A 3-ounce serving of canned clams provides more than 100 percent of the DV for selenium, a trace mineral that helps protect the integrity of muscle cells. Throw chopped clams into pasta sauce, casseroles, or soups. Or stir clams into low-fat sour cream with chopped cilantro and cracked ground pepper and spread on whole-grain crackers.

9. Refried beans:
Don't let the name fool you. "Refried" simply means these pinto beans (or black beans in some cases) are cooked, then mashed, then cooked again. While some fat may be added in the process, the overall fat content is usually negligible. (Just check the label of your favorite brand.) Each half-cup serving provides more than 25 percent of the DV for fiber along with a good dose of protein and iron. Spoon refried beans into burritos, or make Mexican lasagna by layering beans with whole-grain corn tortillas, diced green chilies and peppers, and top it all off with low-fat cheese. Or try this no-fuss, no-muss snack option: Eat a generous spoonful right out of the can topped with zesty salsa.

10. Split-pea-and-ham soup:
Because peas are naturally high in fiber and carbohydrates, give split-pea soup a try. Look for varieties that also include onions and carrots for a good hit of vitamins C and A. Ham adds a bit of protein and great flavor. Served with a salad of fresh greens and some whole-grain bread, split-pea soup is a great way to warm up--and fuel up--after a cold run.
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 09:15 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Has anyone else had a problem with keeping canned pumpkin long term? I have had cans of it pop open andduh.
malu

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11/22/2009 09:18 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Has anyone else had a problem with keeping canned pumpkin long term? I have had cans of it pop open andduh.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 645848


i would guess that it was bad before it was canned
"By way of deception, thou shalt do war."

Israel's Mossad

"The truth shall set you free."

U.S. Central Intelligence Agency Motto
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/22/2009 09:22 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Has anyone else had a problem with keeping canned pumpkin long term? I have had cans of it pop open andduh.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 645848


OK, I just did a search online and didn't find anything about cans opening. The best-used-by dates on the cans are 2 years out. Here's what I found online:

"According to a conversation with a representative of the Libby corp., the shelf life is about two years. Although the pumpkin will not spoil, the quality will go down. They recommended that if there is no "best by" date above the UPC code, throw it out."

[link to wiki.answers.com]
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 09:42 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
The cans that I had weren't very old but maybe something was in it that caused the spoilage. After that, I never kept very much of it on hand.
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 09:43 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Why 2 cases of canned pumpkin, you may ask?

Pumpkin is an anti-oxidant packed fruit with anti-aging and disease fighting benefits. It contains alpha-carotenes, beta-carotenes, vitamins E & C, pantothenic acid, fiber, potassium & magnesium. [link to food-facts.suite101.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 824468


I love baked pumpkin SOOOOOOOoooooooOOOOOOOOOOO much!!!
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 10:48 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Interesting...thanks.
Anonymous Coward
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11/22/2009 11:01 PM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
There was a thread here on GLP several months back - maybe spring or last winter - that gave directions for making pumpkin flour out of fresh pumpkins.

I can't find it now. Does anyone remember it?

It gave directions for making flours out of many foods. I thought I bookmarked it but I guess I didn't.
The Professor
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11/23/2009 12:08 AM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Just be careful of your survival food dollars if your funds are limited. In a survival situation calories are the most important consideration. The 15 ounce can of pumpkin you paid $1.99 for has a total of 140 calories (3.5 servings x 40 calories per serving). For the same $1.99 you can get a 48 fl. oz. bottle of cooking oil which has a total of 11,520 calories (120 calories per serving x 96 servings).

Additionally, your can of pumpkin has a total of only 7 grams of protein (3.5 servings x 2 grams per serving). However for less than $2.00 you can get two cans of Food Lion brand tuna which has a total of 52 grams of protein (each can has 2 servings x 13 grams per serving). Additionally, if you get the tuna packed in oil, two cans will give you a total of 280 calories.

In a survival situation, I would be much more concerned with calories and protein than anti-oxidants, so lets do some math:

Two cans of your pumpkin would cost around $4.00 for which you get 140 calories and 14 grams of protein. For the same $4.00 you can get one bottle of oil and two cans of tuna (in oil) which gives you a total of 11,800 calories and 52 grams of protein; or four cans of tuna having 560 calories and 104 grams of protein.

I think you can do better with your money.

I don't mean to sound like a wise-ass, but I consider myself to be a true survivalists able to live completely off the land, and I cannot overemphasize the importance of calories and, to a lesser extent, protein. With all due respect, I suggest you learn a little more about survival foods. When TSHTF you will be glad you did.
moops

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11/23/2009 12:13 AM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
for long term basic survival.
peanut butter
pancake mix(just add water) syrup
nuts
these items should be in your pantry.they are inexpensive, and have a long shelf life
MOOPS,spreading joy and mayhem :)
[link to www.onegoodkitty.com]
[link to www.biblegateway.com]
And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather EXPOSE them.
Nine's

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11/23/2009 12:14 AM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Since you've got all that pumpkin, I'll offer a couple recipes.....that you probably already have.

Pumpkin Bars
INGREDIENTS

* 2 cups all-purpose flour
* 2 cups white sugar
* 1 cup vegetable oil
* 1 cup chopped walnuts
* 2 teaspoons baking powder
* 2 teaspoons salt
* 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
* 4 eggs
* 2 cups canned pumpkin
* 2 teaspoons baking soda



DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease two 9 x 13 pans.
2. Mix all ingredients until well blended.
3. Bake for 25 minutes. Cool and frost bars with Cream Cheese Frosting.

This makes a very pretty roll:
LIBBY'S® Pumpkin Roll


Directions


Ingredients

* CAKE
* 1/4 cup powdered sugar (to sprinkle on towel)
* 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
* 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
* 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
* 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
* 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 3 large eggs
* 1 cup granulated sugar
* 2/3 cup LIBBY'S® 100% Pure Pumpkin
* 1 cup walnuts, chopped (optional)
* FILLING
* 1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese, at room temperature
* 1 cup powdered sugar, sifted
* 6 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened
* 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
* Powdered sugar (optional for decoration)

FOR CAKE:

PREHEAT oven to 375° F. Grease 15 x 10-inch jelly-roll pan; line with wax paper. Grease and flour paper. Sprinkle a thin, cotton kitchen towel with powdered sugar.

COMBINE flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves and salt in small bowl. Beat eggs and granulated sugar in large mixer bowl until thick. Beat in pumpkin. Stir in flour mixture. Spread evenly into prepared pan. Sprinkle with nuts.

BAKE for 13 to 15 minutes or until top of cake springs back when touched. (If using a dark-colored pan, begin checking for doneness at 11 minutes.) Immediately loosen and turn cake onto prepared towel. Carefully peel off paper. Roll up cake and towel together, starting with narrow end. Cool on wire rack.

FOR FILLING:

BEAT cream cheese, 1 cup powdered sugar, butter and vanilla extract in small mixer bowl until smooth. Carefully unroll cake. Spread cream cheese mixture over cake. Reroll cake. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least one hour. Sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving, if desired.

COOKING TIP:
Be sure to put enough powdered sugar on the towel when rolling up the cake so it will not stick.
Anonymous Coward
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11/23/2009 12:16 AM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Pumpkin Shortage Threatens Holiday Pies

Fans of pumpkin pie may be in for a big disappointment at this year's Thanksgiving dinner. Nestle -- the company that sells about 90 percent of the canned pumpkin in this country -- had a bad harvest and won't be canning any more delicious pumpkin goo this year.

Nearly all the pumpkins that wind up in Nestle cans are grown on a huge farm in Morton, Ill. Heavy rains there made harvesting this year's crop nearly impossible, and the pumpkins rotted in the field. It seems that cold, wet September we had in Illinois is coming back to haunt our holiday tables


[link to www.nbcchicago.com]
Anonymous Coward
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11/23/2009 01:12 AM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Just be careful of your survival food dollars if your funds are limited. In a survival situation calories are the most important consideration. The 15 ounce can of pumpkin you paid $1.99 for has a total of 140 calories (3.5 servings x 40 calories per serving). For the same $1.99 you can get a 48 fl. oz. bottle of cooking oil which has a total of 11,520 calories (120 calories per serving x 96 servings).

Additionally, your can of pumpkin has a total of only 7 grams of protein (3.5 servings x 2 grams per serving). However for less than $2.00 you can get two cans of Food Lion brand tuna which has a total of 52 grams of protein (each can has 2 servings x 13 grams per serving). Additionally, if you get the tuna packed in oil, two cans will give you a total of 280 calories.

In a survival situation, I would be much more concerned with calories and protein than anti-oxidants, so lets do some math:

Two cans of your pumpkin would cost around $4.00 for which you get 140 calories and 14 grams of protein. For the same $4.00 you can get one bottle of oil and two cans of tuna (in oil) which gives you a total of 11,800 calories and 52 grams of protein; or four cans of tuna having 560 calories and 104 grams of protein.

I think you can do better with your money.

I don't mean to sound like a wise-ass, but I consider myself to be a true survivalists able to live completely off the land, and I cannot overemphasize the importance of calories and, to a lesser extent, protein. With all due respect, I suggest you learn a little more about survival foods. When TSHTF you will be glad you did.
 Quoting: The Professor 660063

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Anonymous Coward (OP)
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11/23/2009 03:57 AM
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Re: The Survivalist: Canned Pumpkin for My Survival/Hard Times Pantry!
Just be careful of your survival food dollars if your funds are limited. In a survival situation calories are the most important consideration. The 15 ounce can of pumpkin you paid $1.99 for has a total of 140 calories (3.5 servings x 40 calories per serving). For the same $1.99 you can get a 48 fl. oz. bottle of cooking oil which has a total of 11,520 calories (120 calories per serving x 96 servings).

Additionally, your can of pumpkin has a total of only 7 grams of protein (3.5 servings x 2 grams per serving). However for less than $2.00 you can get two cans of Food Lion brand tuna which has a total of 52 grams of protein (each can has 2 servings x 13 grams per serving). Additionally, if you get the tuna packed in oil, two cans will give you a total of 280 calories.

In a survival situation, I would be much more concerned with calories and protein than anti-oxidants, so lets do some math:

Two cans of your pumpkin would cost around $4.00 for which you get 140 calories and 14 grams of protein. For the same $4.00 you can get one bottle of oil and two cans of tuna (in oil) which gives you a total of 11,800 calories and 52 grams of protein; or four cans of tuna having 560 calories and 104 grams of protein.

I think you can do better with your money.

I don't mean to sound like a wise-ass, but I consider myself to be a true survivalists able to live completely off the land, and I cannot overemphasize the importance of calories and, to a lesser extent, protein. With all due respect, I suggest you learn a little more about survival foods. When TSHTF you will be glad you did.
 Quoting: The Professor 660063


I don't think you're a wise-ass, I just don't agree w/you.

I think you're taking my post out of context and assuming I don't have enough protein and calories already.

I'm not that fond of tuna as a survival food. It's much better to have nuts, canned sardines, mackerel, salmon and canned clams than rely on tuna. I wouldn't eat tuna more than once a week on account of the mercury load.

I wouldn't want to have lasting health problems on account of having to live off my survival food for a month.

And LOL @ the thought of living more than a couple of days eating canned tuna and oil exclusively.

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