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Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?

 
Anonymous Coward
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12/21/2009 04:43 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
That whole article is bullshit...its just more nibiru planet x crap packaged as scientific inquiry.

But like they said you'll have your answer in a short while.
Dream Killer (OP)

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12/21/2009 04:45 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Another pertinent excerpt from the same website quoted above...

[link to www.subversiveelement.com]


Contrary to what happens in Hollywood movies, where the government comes clean about comets (actually, in Deep Impact they waited almost a year after official knowledge to announce it to the public), wouldn't it rather make sense that such an announcement would not be made public, at least too far in advance of D-day? Tom van Flandern of the U.S. Naval Observatory, who was quoted in the 1982 Newsweek article, admits that a tenth planet is possible, but argues that it would have to be so huge that it should have been observed by now. We must admit that there is a serious possibility that more details regarding Planet X are in fact known, but we are not being informed. Is there a major cover-up of Planet X ? This possibility was actually discussed in an article in the CCNet Digest on May 18, 1998 entitled "The Secrets of Asteroid Peril, British Media Smells a Rat." This article claimed that a report in the London Daily Mail accused US astronomers of trying to cover up scientific data until NASA has a chance to look at the information. The report indicated that "earth-shattering" information, such as the discovery of incoming comets or asteroids, has been ordered to go through NASA first. The Daily Mail report of May 15, 1998 entitled "Delayed Impact, or the Secrets of Asteroid Peril," stated the following:
"If a giant asteroid is hurtling in the general direction of our planet, we will be the last to know about it. For astronomers have decided that the news would be too earth shattering for ordinary mortals to handle, and would likely cause widespread panic. In a week that sees the release of the film Deep Impact, a fictional account of just such a catastrophe, astronomers funded by the American space agency NASA have now agreed to keep asteroid and comet discoveries to themselves for 48 hours while more detailed calculations are made. The findings would then go to NASA, which would wait another 24 hours before going public."
A Los Angeles AP article on May 19, 1998 also reported on this 72 hour delay rule imposed by NASA on announcements to the public of asteroids or comets by astronomers. The report indicated that these measures were undertaken to avoid the "doomsday alert" which occurred in March of 1998 with regard to an asteroid which was due to collide with Earth in 2028, and which was "soon found to be a mistake." These new procedures, the article stated, are "not an attempt to hide anything but to make sure the information is accurate." How can we be sure that if the information is found to be accurate, NASA will not (a) find it to be a "mistake," or (b) withhold the message for a longer period of time?
Dream Killer (OP)

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12/21/2009 04:47 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
That whole article is bullshit...its just more nibiru planet x crap packaged as scientific inquiry.

But like they said you'll have your answer in a short while.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 844626


The earth used to be flat also.. Right?

You're most CERTAINLY right... IF this is accurate, we're expected to traverse the third magnetic node ring of force from this object anytime during the end of Dec. 2009 to the second week of Jan. 2010...

Keep an ear to the ground....
Dream Killer (OP)

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12/21/2009 04:49 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
That whole article is bullshit...its just more nibiru planet x crap packaged as scientific inquiry.

But like they said you'll have your answer in a short while.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 844626


Incidentally... Did you happen to follow some of the other preliminary links given on this thread? The internet was originally designed to share scientific data...

The article you mention is only ONE of the links on this thread, other more technical information is contained in some of the other links above...

Always keep an open mind, just make sure your brains don't fall out...
Anonymous Coward
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12/21/2009 04:50 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
my hypothesis is that all solar systems are binary. the second star lies in a higher dimension, which also means a looong physical distance. <- reason why we cannot detect it.

[link to docvphysics.blogspot.com]
 Quoting: gus.


i always wondered if px was in one of those vibrations of light that our eyes cant pick up.
Anonymous Coward
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12/21/2009 04:50 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
It is Binary.

The Sun and Jupiter
Dream Killer (OP)

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12/21/2009 04:57 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
It is Binary.

The Sun and Jupiter
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 780984


I long thought that also... The way the data shakes out, though, under current understanding, Jupiter doesn't (yet) have the mass to ignite and sustain the chain reaction necessary to become a full-fledged "star" of any known classification....
AstronutModerator
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12/21/2009 04:59 PM

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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
A Los Angeles AP article on May 19, 1998 also reported on this 72 hour delay rule imposed by NASA on announcements to the public of asteroids or comets by astronomers. The report indicated that these measures were undertaken to avoid the "doomsday alert" which occurred in March of 1998 with regard to an asteroid which was due to collide with Earth in 2028, and which was "soon found to be a mistake." These new procedures, the article stated, are "not an attempt to hide anything but to make sure the information is accurate." How can we be sure that if the information is found to be accurate, NASA will not (a) find it to be a "mistake," or (b) withhold the message for a longer period of time?
 Quoting: Dream Killer

One huge problem with your theory; the astronomers already know about it, whether NASA makes a public statement or not. NASA depends on astronomers to observe these objects and weed out the real threats from the false alarms, and that includes many amateur astronomers as well. Here was one near-alert that was ruled out by an amateur astronomer's observations:
[link to news.bbc.co.uk]
Amateurs are able to do this because we have access to the data, as soon as it's available, not days later. If NASA proceeded to lie about the true location of a threatening asteroid, we'd know about it.
astrobanner2
Dream Killer (OP)

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12/21/2009 05:01 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
A Los Angeles AP article on May 19, 1998 also reported on this 72 hour delay rule imposed by NASA on announcements to the public of asteroids or comets by astronomers. The report indicated that these measures were undertaken to avoid the "doomsday alert" which occurred in March of 1998 with regard to an asteroid which was due to collide with Earth in 2028, and which was "soon found to be a mistake." These new procedures, the article stated, are "not an attempt to hide anything but to make sure the information is accurate." How can we be sure that if the information is found to be accurate, NASA will not (a) find it to be a "mistake," or (b) withhold the message for a longer period of time?

One huge problem with your theory; the astronomers already know about it, whether NASA makes a public statement or not. NASA depends on astronomers to observe these objects and weed out the real threats from the false alarms, and that includes many amateur astronomers as well. Here was one near-alert that was ruled out by an amateur astronomer's observations:
[link to news.bbc.co.uk]
Amateurs are able to do this because we have access to the data, as soon as it's available, not days later. If NASA proceeded to lie about the true location of a threatening asteroid, we'd know about it.
 Quoting: Astronut


Granted you're correct, however, how many "sheeple" follow these things close enough on their own to make considered conclusions... MOST folks depend on CNN (sigh....)
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 844626
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12/21/2009 05:15 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
That whole article is bullshit...its just more nibiru planet x crap packaged as scientific inquiry.

But like they said you'll have your answer in a short while.


Incidentally... Did you happen to follow some of the other preliminary links given on this thread? The internet was originally designed to share scientific data...

The article you mention is only ONE of the links on this thread, other more technical information is contained in some of the other links above...

Always keep an open mind, just make sure your brains don't fall out...
 Quoting: Dream Killer



I have an open mind. I find it interesting that at around the same time a portion of the world is awaiting Planet X/Nibiru, Scientists are searching for brown dwarfs at the edge of the solar system. Coincidence?

One and the same I tell ya, one and the same.

This brown dwarf you seek is in a different dimension of reality, so to speak. It's there...but it ain't there. its our Suns reflection or something like that.

I saw it once...a long time ago. I was dating this crazy woman and she showed it to me.
Anonymous Coward
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12/21/2009 06:57 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
That whole article is bullshit...its just more nibiru planet x crap packaged as scientific inquiry.

But like they said you'll have your answer in a short while.


Incidentally... Did you happen to follow some of the other preliminary links given on this thread? The internet was originally designed to share scientific data...

The article you mention is only ONE of the links on this thread, other more technical information is contained in some of the other links above...

Always keep an open mind, just make sure your brains don't fall out...



I have an open mind. I find it interesting that at around the same time a portion of the world is awaiting Planet X/Nibiru, Scientists are searching for brown dwarfs at the edge of the solar system. Coincidence?

One and the same I tell ya, one and the same.

This brown dwarf you seek is in a different dimension of reality, so to speak. It's there...but it ain't there. its our Suns reflection or something like that.

I saw it once...a long time ago. I was dating this crazy woman and she showed it to me.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 844626



We know from looking at the hexagon spinning around the pole on Saturn that multi-dimensional planes exist and often "reflect" into other dimensions. One of the disciplines of this research is known as hyperdimensional physics...

[link to www.enterprisemission.com]

This research is the only thing that "explains" how gases can make sharp turns in a geometric shape (Saturn's hexagon)

[link to www.google.com]

Let's keep digging...
Anonymous Coward
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12/21/2009 06:59 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
no... jupiter didn't quite make it.
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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12/21/2009 07:49 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
More detail on the pole shifting can be found here:

[link to news.nationalgeographic.com]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 498050
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12/22/2009 12:04 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Yeah, that was me putting the 4th vote on the 444th view witrh 44 replies

Peace,
Nrg
Anonymous Coward
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12/22/2009 02:27 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Precession of the equinox is best explained if our star is part of a binary system. To find out more go to the Binary research institute
[link to www.binaryresearchinstitute.org]
gus.

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12/22/2009 02:30 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
It is Binary.

The Sun and Jupiter


I long thought that also... The way the data shakes out, though, under current understanding, Jupiter doesn't (yet) have the mass to ignite and sustain the chain reaction necessary to become a full-fledged "star" of any known classification....
 Quoting: Dream Killer


Alex Collier says that Jupiter is a "dark sun" in a higher dimension.

when I say higher dimension, it can also mean a long way in the future. For example, according to my research Earth in the 5th dimension exists after 3000 AD.

Last Edited by gus. on 12/22/2009 07:00 AM
The Final Truth - A Theory of Practice
[link to www.conspiracybase.com]
Anonymous Coward
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12/22/2009 06:58 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Yeah, that was me putting the 4th vote on the 444th view witrh 44 replies

Peace,
Nrg
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 498050


444444444444444's?

Check out the solstice for 2012 in Dec. Data shows the Winter Solstice that is making all the headlines will be right at 11:11

Just an interesting footnote, thanks for the observation and the comment:

[link to www.usno.navy.mil]
GraftedPromise
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12/22/2009 11:34 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
.
... so ... is there a date? ...
.
Dream Killer

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12/22/2009 11:50 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
This is a cross posted link...

AMAZING VIDEO!!!


[link to www.dailymotion.com]

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 12/23/2009 12:00 AM
Dream Killer

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12/22/2009 11:54 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
.
... so ... is there a date? ...
.
 Quoting: GraftedPromise 844594


From all appearances, we are ALREADY in it!

Related thread...

Thread: The Elites Are Preparing For A Big Event!

horn

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 12/22/2009 11:56 PM
Nikki_LaVey

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12/23/2009 12:22 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
We would notice gravitational abnormalities is other bodies (planets) ... so no the math doesn't work.
How Can You Be Two Places At Once When You're Not Anywhere at all
Dream Killer

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12/23/2009 06:56 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
We would notice gravitational abnormalities is other bodies (planets) ... so no the math doesn't work.
 Quoting: Nikki_LaVey


Our knowledge of these things is far from perfect. I submit, it's possible that the entire model from which we base our opinions could be a result of the presence of this body. Assuming there is another mass out there... And that it IS 90 degrees out of phase with us, it's possible that it acts as a sort of gyroscope that, in fact, STABILIZES orbits up to a point BEFORE disrupting them. IF this body has been around as long as we have, of course we would have no other foundation for our math...

Possible?
Dream Killer

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12/23/2009 07:05 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
More detail on the pole shifting can be found here:

[link to news.nationalgeographic.com]
 Quoting: Dream Killer


It is a seldom reported fact that our magnetic pole has been migrating toward Siberia at the rate of 25 miles a year since the mid 80's which suggests the possibility of some tremendous magnetic tidal forces impacting earth.

[link to www.encyclopedia.com]
[link to news.nationalgeographic.com]

We DO know also that the Chandler wobble has changed, the scientists state that after Sumatra, (the first magnetic node ring passing through us) the wobble changed to the point that the atomic clock had to be recalibrated! While the impact of this change appears only to be instrumentally minute, we do not yet know the full impact of this, or if more such shifts and worse ones are coming....

[link to www.michaelmandeville.com]
[link to www.uwgb.edu]

I am NOT saying unequivocally that the geometric pole will change, actually, I doubt that very seriously, however, it IS likely that as our magnetic pole migrates, we WILL experience some tremendous upheavals.

The 3rd node ring is approaching and passing through us as this thread is being written, look at the amazing confluence of fireballs and volcanoes and earthquakes occurring right now. The Norway "spiral" event is also possibly the strangest atmospheric display of modern time. Even though we've had multitudes of these other types of events before, this recent flurry is unprecedented in our recorded history. Again, Occam's razor seems to suggest we ARE a binary system.

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 12/23/2009 07:57 AM
Maxim
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12/23/2009 07:22 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Awesome thread, guys... If one has a meager amount of money, what is the best telescope one could get? I mean, can a good telescope be purchased for $300.00?
Anonymous Coward
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12/23/2009 07:27 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
could be, but probably not. There are plenty of single star systems out there.

Generally suns are not much further than 2~6AU apart in other systems. Which isn't far

if you are talking lightyears apart, well then science really has no explantaion, outside of theoretical
Dream Killer

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12/23/2009 07:40 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Awesome thread, guys... If one has a meager amount of money, what is the best telescope one could get? I mean, can a good telescope be purchased for $300.00?
 Quoting: Maxim 328069


For $300 your choices are limited... While I prefer refractors, you'll get more bang for the buck with a reflector. You may check on e-Bay but buyer beware, reflectors in that price range will probably be lower quality and may need adjusting, IF the mirror is OK, they may be adjusted, the mirror is the key.

You can probably get a decent 70mm refractor in that range, which would be my choice....

"Spotting scopes" in that range are available up to around 104mm as long as you're willing to compromise on the f stop rating...
Maxim
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12/23/2009 07:42 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Thanks a lot! Every year I ask my family for a telescope, and it's never under the tree.... So, I think I will get one myself within six months, and since $300 is a little too modest, I will know what to look for. hf
Maxim

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12/23/2009 07:46 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
The research is on!
Anonymous Coward
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12/23/2009 08:57 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
hmmm ... it appears no one has bothered to check out this link to the BINARY RESEARCH INSTITUTE. If you're seriously wondering if the sun is part of a binary system you really should check them out. I think they make a very convincing case that it is.

[link to www.binaryresearchinstitute.org]

so here's some quotes for you

Researchers at BRI have noticed a number of problems related to the current theory of precession. While VLBI, laser ranging and other related technologies do a good job at determining the earth’s orientation, the sun’s movement through space has not been coordinated with these findings resulting in unintentional bias of precession inputs. In examining the phenomenon of precession of the equinox (which was the original impetus for the development of lunisolar precession theory) we have found that a binary orbit motion of our sun and solar system is a simpler way to reproduce the same observable without any of the problems associated with current precession theory. Indeed, elliptical orbit equations have been found to be a better predictor of precession rates than Newcomb's formula, showing about ten times greater accuracy over the last hundred years. Moreover, a binary orbit motion of our sun provides a solution to a number of solar system formation theory enigmas including angular momentum. For these reasons, BRI has concluded our sun is most likely part of a long cycle binary system.

A binary system is two stars gravitationally bound orbiting a common center of mass. The stars can be of the same or differing sizes and orbits can be as short as a few days or as long as thousands of years. The short ones are easy to detect, the long ones difficult, some probably impossible to detect because of the very long observation period required.

While there is no obvious visible companion star to our Sun, there could be a dark binary, such as a brown dwarf or possibly a relatively small black hole, either of which might be very difficult to detect, without accurate and lengthy analysis.

There is also the possibility that our sun might be in a binary or complex gravitational relationship with one of several nearby “visible” stars. This scenario may require thinking beyond standard Newtonian dynamics to embrace MOND or MOG or some similar theory (that suggests that the constant of G might be stronger between stellar objects or in big space than between planetary objects within the solar system). This approach to viewing stellar relationships in the galaxy, and galactic relationships in the universe, might also solve certain problems that presently require the invocation of dark matter or dark energy. There are a number of possibilities within the visible star scenario that seem to have some support in certain myth and folklore (I have speculated on a few in my book “Lost Star of Myth and Time”) but at this point our work is principally focused on precession, rather than identifying the object that shares the common center of mass, that indirectly causes the solar system’s reorientation to space a.k.a. the precession observable.

Beyond direct detection – one way to determine if we are in a binary system is to see if the Sun is curving through space. To us on Earth that means we should experience a gradual “changing orientation to inertial space.” Such a phenomenon is observed as the precession of the equinox.
Dream Killer (OP)

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12/23/2009 09:48 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
hmmm ... it appears no one has bothered to check out this link to the BINARY RESEARCH INSTITUTE. If you're seriously wondering if the sun is part of a binary system you really should check them out. I think they make a very convincing case that it is.

[link to www.binaryresearchinstitute.org]

so here's some quotes for you

Researchers at BRI have noticed a number of problems related to the current theory of precession. While VLBI, laser ranging and other related technologies do a good job at determining the earth’s orientation, the sun’s movement through space has not been coordinated with these findings resulting in unintentional bias of precession inputs. In examining the phenomenon of precession of the equinox (which was the original impetus for the development of lunisolar precession theory) we have found that a binary orbit motion of our sun and solar system is a simpler way to reproduce the same observable without any of the problems associated with current precession theory. Indeed, elliptical orbit equations have been found to be a better predictor of precession rates than Newcomb's formula, showing about ten times greater accuracy over the last hundred years. Moreover, a binary orbit motion of our sun provides a solution to a number of solar system formation theory enigmas including angular momentum. For these reasons, BRI has concluded our sun is most likely part of a long cycle binary system.

A binary system is two stars gravitationally bound orbiting a common center of mass. The stars can be of the same or differing sizes and orbits can be as short as a few days or as long as thousands of years. The short ones are easy to detect, the long ones difficult, some probably impossible to detect because of the very long observation period required.

While there is no obvious visible companion star to our Sun, there could be a dark binary, such as a brown dwarf or possibly a relatively small black hole, either of which might be very difficult to detect, without accurate and lengthy analysis.

There is also the possibility that our sun might be in a binary or complex gravitational relationship with one of several nearby “visible” stars. This scenario may require thinking beyond standard Newtonian dynamics to embrace MOND or MOG or some similar theory (that suggests that the constant of G might be stronger between stellar objects or in big space than between planetary objects within the solar system). This approach to viewing stellar relationships in the galaxy, and galactic relationships in the universe, might also solve certain problems that presently require the invocation of dark matter or dark energy. There are a number of possibilities within the visible star scenario that seem to have some support in certain myth and folklore (I have speculated on a few in my book “Lost Star of Myth and Time”) but at this point our work is principally focused on precession, rather than identifying the object that shares the common center of mass, that indirectly causes the solar system’s reorientation to space a.k.a. the precession observable.

Beyond direct detection – one way to determine if we are in a binary system is to see if the Sun is curving through space. To us on Earth that means we should experience a gradual “changing orientation to inertial space.” Such a phenomenon is observed as the precession of the equinox.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 840010


A most EXCELLENT and welcome addition! Thanks for the post!

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