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Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 438726
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12/30/2009 03:55 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Read this Website. Lots of good information here.

[link to www.binaryresearchinstitute.org]
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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12/30/2009 04:03 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Read this Website. Lots of good information here.

[link to www.binaryresearchinstitute.org]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 438726


Thanks for the reference...

Will scope it out and post excerpts here if they fit..

Much appreciated!
Dream Killer

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12/30/2009 11:25 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
bump
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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12/30/2009 09:27 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
For whoever is interested in tech data surrounding this phenomenon, I submit the following:

bump
Vedic Medic

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12/30/2009 09:29 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Wanna talk about Magnestars?
Vedic Medic

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12/30/2009 09:35 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
No?...
Dream Killer

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12/30/2009 10:02 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?


Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/01/2010 03:13 AM
Dream Killer

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01/01/2010 03:14 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Wanna talk about Magnestars?
 Quoting: Vedic Medic


Been off for the holiday/relative thing..

YES, let's talk magnetars....
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 803157
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01/01/2010 03:47 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
If our sun does have a companion star it has to be pretty far out there. First off a brown dwarf will be 10 to 75 times the mass of Jupiter. Jupiter is a very bright object. So for an object 10 to 75 times more massive not to be seen and not to have a obvious impact on the sun and planets gravitationally, it has to be atleast a lightyear or more away. Still it is plausible.


[link to news.discovery.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 842606



The companion in the binary system gets no closer than 30 AU from the Sun.

[link to www.google.com]
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/01/2010 07:19 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
If our sun does have a companion star it has to be pretty far out there. First off a brown dwarf will be 10 to 75 times the mass of Jupiter. Jupiter is a very bright object. So for an object 10 to 75 times more massive not to be seen and not to have a obvious impact on the sun and planets gravitationally, it has to be atleast a lightyear or more away. Still it is plausible.


[link to news.discovery.com]



The companion in the binary system gets no closer than 30 AU from the Sun.

[link to www.google.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 803157


Assuming the tremendous body of detailed research on this blog is accurate, and there's no reason NOT to, your 30AU distance concept may be accurate when the companion body is not in it's perihelion maneuver. During this transition, there's nothing to prohibit the object from getting MUCH closer than that.

Also, the research here bears out that brown dwarf sub-stars may be as small as 3-7 Jupiter masses....

Our magnetosphere is being HIGHLY disrupted, and the rest of the planets in our system are heating up probably due to the approaching magnetic node rings surrounding the dwarf as it executes the perihelion maneuver...
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 852549
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01/01/2010 07:27 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
If our sun does have a companion star it has to be pretty far out there. First off a brown dwarf will be 10 to 75 times the mass of Jupiter. Jupiter is a very bright object. So for an object 10 to 75 times more massive not to be seen and not to have a obvious impact on the sun and planets gravitationally, it has to be atleast a lightyear or more away. Still it is plausible.


[link to news.discovery.com]



The companion in the binary system gets no closer than 30 AU from the Sun.

[link to www.google.com]


Assuming the tremendous body of detailed research on this blog is accurate, and there's no reason NOT to, your 30AU distance concept may be accurate when the companion body is not in it's perihelion maneuver. During this transition, there's nothing to prohibit the object from getting MUCH closer than that.

Also, the research here bears out that brown dwarf sub-stars may be as small as 3-7 Jupiter masses....

Our magnetosphere is being HIGHLY disrupted, and the rest of the planets in our system are heating up probably due to the approaching magnetic node rings surrounding the dwarf as it executes the perihelion maneuver...
 Quoting: Dream Killer


Seems to me the magnetosphere has been pretty stable and hasn't been getting many 'hits' at all. I see the increased fireball/comet activity as being good indiciators of this theory, but the magnetosphere is activity has been minimul lately.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 03:40 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Please refer to the following technical research detailing the disruptions I'm referring to with regard to the magnetosphere of our planet:

[link to www.astro.auth.gr]

Enjoy!
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 03:41 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Please refer to the following technical research detailing the disruptions I'm referring to with regard to the magnetosphere of our planet:

[link to www.astro.auth.gr]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 846392
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01/02/2010 03:46 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
If our sun does have a companion star it has to be pretty far out there. First off a brown dwarf will be 10 to 75 times the mass of Jupiter. Jupiter is a very bright object. So for an object 10 to 75 times more massive not to be seen and not to have a obvious impact on the sun and planets gravitationally, it has to be atleast a lightyear or more away. Still it is plausible.


[link to news.discovery.com]



The companion in the binary system gets no closer than 30 AU from the Sun.

[link to www.google.com]
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 803157


didn't you read my initial post in the first page? cheers
I'm not GLP's foremost intellect for nothing! bananawhip

Sirius is our companion star, the sun is a wormhole and conduit for inter-dimensional light
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 04:00 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Also consider this secondary reference... The magnetosphere of our planet IS DEFINITELY weakening and is being distrupted by SOMETHING....

The approach of a brown dwarf into our locality celestially would certainly explain this as the magnetic node rings of the object impact our planet as it draws nearer..

This is an object, BTW, that can NOT be seen by telescopes under many scenarios detailed earlier in this blog...

[link to www.brighthub.com]
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 04:03 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Here's a series of much more pertinent and timely information surrounding this crisis in our geomagnetic fields....

[link to video.google.com]

Please take some time and review this material...
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 855184
Canada
01/02/2010 04:04 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Also consider this secondary reference... The magnetosphere of our planet IS DEFINITELY weakening and is being distrupted by SOMETHING....

The approach of a brown dwarf into our locality celestially would certainly explain this as the magnetic node rings of the object impact our planet as it draws nearer..

This is an object, BTW, that can NOT be seen by telescopes under many scenarios detailed earlier in this blog...

[link to www.brighthub.com]
 Quoting: Dream Killer

its the second sun hf

great info thanks...
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 04:05 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
If our sun does have a companion star it has to be pretty far out there. First off a brown dwarf will be 10 to 75 times the mass of Jupiter. Jupiter is a very bright object. So for an object 10 to 75 times more massive not to be seen and not to have a obvious impact on the sun and planets gravitationally, it has to be atleast a lightyear or more away. Still it is plausible.


[link to news.discovery.com]



The companion in the binary system gets no closer than 30 AU from the Sun.

[link to www.google.com]


Assuming the tremendous body of detailed research on this blog is accurate, and there's no reason NOT to, your 30AU distance concept may be accurate when the companion body is not in it's perihelion maneuver. During this transition, there's nothing to prohibit the object from getting MUCH closer than that.

Also, the research here bears out that brown dwarf sub-stars may be as small as 3-7 Jupiter masses....

Our magnetosphere is being HIGHLY disrupted, and the rest of the planets in our system are heating up probably due to the approaching magnetic node rings surrounding the dwarf as it executes the perihelion maneuver...
 Quoting: Dream Killer


I think I already answered this... While Sirius may represent a "triad" system we're in, and they ARE proven to exist, in this forum, I'm talking about a different object that doesn't fit the description you detailed. While "generally" accurate, theories are proven by their exceptions.
Anonymous Coward
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01/02/2010 04:08 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
ps. the reoccurring theme of this years crop circles was based on earths magnetisphere..
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 564424
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01/02/2010 04:14 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
I'd like to open a venue for the placement of information regarding our solar system actually being a BINARY system, with a Brown Dwarf as the companion star...

I have a good amount of information and links I'll be posting to this thread, and am interested in hearing from anyone with information, opinion, or curiosity regarding this possibility.

YES, it IS a "shooting gallery" out there....

And we are in it! stars
 Quoting: Dream Killer 843139


Your links and proof are bullshit. Any two-bit math major can prove it.

Planets would experience a period of slow orbit while closest to the binary twin, they would all do this, and they would all do it in the same relative area of orbit.

None of them do.


bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 04:16 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
ps. the reoccurring theme of this years crop circles was based on earths magnetisphere..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 855184


You raise an EXCELLENT sidebar issue... Not only have the crop circles represented changes in the magnetosphere, but also, they have been eerily tied to Mayan geometry and diagrams....

Here's a recent one of the MANY that have occurred this year..

[link to angularmomentum.eu]

Please also look at this video relating your magnetosphere/crop circle connection:

[link to www.youtube.com]

Thanks for the post!

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/02/2010 05:01 AM
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 04:16 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
I'd like to open a venue for the placement of information regarding our solar system actually being a BINARY system, with a Brown Dwarf as the companion star...

I have a good amount of information and links I'll be posting to this thread, and am interested in hearing from anyone with information, opinion, or curiosity regarding this possibility.

YES, it IS a "shooting gallery" out there....

And we are in it! stars


Your links and proof are bullshit. Any two-bit math major can prove it.

Planets would experience a period of slow orbit while closest to the binary twin, they would all do this, and they would all do it in the same relative area of orbit.

None of them do.


bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 564424


By all means... Please enlighten us!
The orbits of the outer planets have LONG been exhibiting perturbations over many years, these have STILL remained unexplained. I would LOVE to see your mathematical proof of YOUR solution to this celestial dynamic anomaly!

Probably would get you a Nobel!

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/02/2010 04:23 AM
Dream Killer

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01/02/2010 04:39 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Oh and BTW Anonymous Coward 564424....

The elliptical orbits of ALL the planets demonstrate by the very nature of BEING an ellipse that there are TWO foci in the dynamic...

Again, I'm waiting on the edge of my chair for your mathematical proof...

Assuming, of course, that you are BEYOND some "two-bit" math major...
(or at LEAST on the same "par" as one...)

Well?

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/02/2010 04:43 AM
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/02/2010 04:46 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Back to the magnetosphere for a follow-up...

Here is probably one of the best singular resources CONFIRMING the distortion/disruptions in our magnetosphere..

[link to www2.nict.go.jp]

REAL TIME CURRENT GRAPH:

[link to www2.nict.go.jp]

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/02/2010 04:48 AM
Dream Killer

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01/02/2010 06:40 AM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?


Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/02/2010 07:19 PM
Dream Killer

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01/02/2010 07:19 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
bump
nomuse (NLI)
User ID: 834029
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01/02/2010 08:34 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Oh and BTW Anonymous Coward 564424....

The elliptical orbits of ALL the planets demonstrate by the very nature of BEING an ellipse that there are TWO foci in the dynamic...

Again, I'm waiting on the edge of my chair for your mathematical proof...

Assuming, of course, that you are BEYOND some "two-bit" math major...
(or at LEAST on the same "par" as one...)

Well?
 Quoting: Dream Killer



What, you re-writing Newton and Kepler now?

No. You don't need two foci to make an elliptical orbit.



I'd be interested in these supposed unexplained peturbations of yours...yes, I know there are still some...but it was by examining those that we discovered Pluto...which is forty AU out, a fraction of the mass of the Moon, has an apparent magnitude of only 15 but was predicted and located in 1930!

Seems to me a body several times the mass of Jupiter, brilliant in infrared, getting to within 30 AU, and actively interfering with the solar magnetic field, would have been spotted well before Pluto was. It certainly wouldn't hide even from amateurs until 2010.
Anonymous Coward
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01/02/2010 08:48 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
lots of activity today Dream hf
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/03/2010 09:24 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Oh and BTW Anonymous Coward 564424....

The elliptical orbits of ALL the planets demonstrate by the very nature of BEING an ellipse that there are TWO foci in the dynamic...

Again, I'm waiting on the edge of my chair for your mathematical proof...

Assuming, of course, that you are BEYOND some "two-bit" math major...
(or at LEAST on the same "par" as one...)

Well?



What, you re-writing Newton and Kepler now?

No. You don't need two foci to make an elliptical orbit.



I'd be interested in these supposed unexplained peturbations of yours...yes, I know there are still some...but it was by examining those that we discovered Pluto...which is forty AU out, a fraction of the mass of the Moon, has an apparent magnitude of only 15 but was predicted and located in 1930!

Seems to me a body several times the mass of Jupiter, brilliant in infrared, getting to within 30 AU, and actively interfering with the solar magnetic field, would have been spotted well before Pluto was. It certainly wouldn't hide even from amateurs until 2010.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 834029


All of the research links regarding your questions are already posted on this blog in earlier pages...

BTW: If you go back and check the research links out thoroughly, the explanation WHY the object isn't visible even in the infrared, is that it may be a very COLD object. The GP-8 project, which can find objects just above absolute zero DID locate such an object. Not once, but TWO times! Before a third measurement could be made to triangulate the positions, and calculate orbit ellipse, the project was supposedly shut down.

Amateurs do NOT have access to this kind of technology, it is FAR to expensive. The reason they "said" the GP probe was shut down was because it ran out of supercooled helium, which allowed it to measure such cold objects.

ALL of this research is available on earlier pages...

Thanks for the cogent conversation!

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/03/2010 09:25 PM
Dream Killer

User ID: 846541
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01/03/2010 09:28 PM
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Re: Is our Solar System a Binary Star System?
Oh and BTW Anonymous Coward 564424....

The elliptical orbits of ALL the planets demonstrate by the very nature of BEING an ellipse that there are TWO foci in the dynamic...

Again, I'm waiting on the edge of my chair for your mathematical proof...

Assuming, of course, that you are BEYOND some "two-bit" math major...
(or at LEAST on the same "par" as one...)

Well?



What, you re-writing Newton and Kepler now?

No. You don't need two foci to make an elliptical orbit.



I'd be interested in these supposed unexplained peturbations of yours...yes, I know there are still some...but it was by examining those that we discovered Pluto...which is forty AU out, a fraction of the mass of the Moon, has an apparent magnitude of only 15 but was predicted and located in 1930!

Seems to me a body several times the mass of Jupiter, brilliant in infrared, getting to within 30 AU, and actively interfering with the solar magnetic field, would have been spotted well before Pluto was. It certainly wouldn't hide even from amateurs until 2010.
 Quoting: nomuse (NLI) 834029



OH BTW: Here's the PROOF of ellipses requiring TWO foci..

Sure YOU aren't trying to rewrite Newton and/or Kepler?

[link to en.wikipedia.org]

You'll note for an ellipse to occur in a planetary body, both F1 and F2 are required, at least that's what the physicists say, check the above link for yourself.

Last Edited by Dream Killer on 01/03/2010 09:30 PM

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