Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 3,150 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 1,952,669
Pageviews Today: 2,597,793Threads Today: 701Posts Today: 11,976
06:47 PM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity

 
Gazing @ Orion
Offer Upgrade

User ID: 883032
India
02/05/2010 01:10 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
THE GIST:

* Synthetic solar cells can be grown in tobacco plants and E. coli bacteria.
* The method offers a cheap, environmentally friendly way to make electricity.
* Tapping the plants exploits an already efficient system, honed by millions of years of evolution.

Tobacco plants could help wean the world from fossil fuels, according to scientists from the University of California, Berkeley.

In a paper in the journal ACS Nano Letters, Matt Francis and his colleagues used genetically engineered bacteria to produce the building blocks for artificial photovoltaic and photochemical cells. The technique could be more environmentally friendly than traditional methods of making solar cells and could lead to cheap, temporary and biodegradable solar cells.

"Over billions of years, evolution has established exactly the right distances between chromophore to allow them to collect and use light from the sun with unparalleled efficiency," said Francis. "We are trying to mimic these finely tuned systems using the tobacco mosaic virus."

Synthetic solar cells don't just grow on tobacco plants. They have to be programmed to grow on tobacco plants. Reprogramming every cell of a mature tobacco plant would be a massive undertaking for human scientists.

For the tobacco mosaic virus, however, reprogramming adult tobacco cells to produce tiny structures the plant normally would not make is what the virus does best. The scientists tweak a few genes in the virus, spray it over a crop of tobacco plants, and wait.

Usually, an infected cell creates new copies of the virus that infected it. This time, the virus forces the plant to create artificial chromophores, structures that turn light into high powered electrons.

Like a tightly coiled spiral staircase, individual chromophores are added one at a time until a rod hundreds of nanometers long is created. Each chromophore is two to three nanometers away from their nearest neighbor, an important distance. Even one atom closer to each other, and an electric current would be halted. Any further and harvesting the electrons would be difficult.

"It's very difficult to recreate photosynthesis," said Angela Belcher, a researcher at MIT who uses viruses to build batteries and other structures. "The precision of each structure is very important, and it's very hard to pick up one molecule and put it where you want it to be."

The beauty of the Nano Letters paper, says Belcher, is that it exploits an already efficient system, honed by millions of years of evolution, to produce structures for humans.

Trapped inside the plant, the tiny structures don't produce electricity or chemicals. To get at the synthetic chromophores, scientists would have to harvest the plants, chop them up, and then extract the structures. Dissolved in a liquid solution, the structures are sprayed over a glass or plastic substrate coated with molecules that secure the rods to the plastic.

Tobacco plants aren't the only organisms Francis and his colleagues have hacked. Skipping a virus entirely, Francis and his colleagues successfully added the chromophore-producing genes to E. coli bacteria, and harvested solar cells from them as well.

Using live organisms to create synthetic solar cells has several advantages over traditionally made solar panels. No environmentally toxic chemicals are required to make biologically derived solar cells, unlike traditional solar cells. Growing solar cells in tobacco plants could put farmers back to work harvesting an annual crop of solar cells.

Bio-based solar cells wouldn't last as long as the average silicon solar cell, but they could act as a cheap, transportable, and temporary biodegradable power source. A solution of them could even be sprayed over plastic or glass to harvest energy.
[link to news.discovery.com]

Last Edited by Phennommennonn on 09/23/2012 10:36 AM
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 883671
India
02/06/2010 04:17 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Ultimate In 'Green' Energy: Plants Inspire New Generation Of Solar Cells

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2009) — The ability of plants to turn sunlight into energy through photosynthesis has been successfully mimicked by scientists at the University of Southampton to produce a new generation of solar cells.

The Southampton team led by Professor Pavlos Lagoudakis of the University's School of Physics and Astronomy, has developed a new range of photovoltaic devices that use a process found in vegetative methods of light harvesting, to deliver unprecedented amounts of electrical current from light.

In photosynthesis each molecule has evolved to deliver a function that complements the perpetual cycle of light to energy conversion. With the advent of nanoscience, scientists are now able to build devices of multiple nanoscale components, each one designed to deliver a specific functionality.

Professor Lagoudakis comments: "We looked at the ways that energy is funnelled in nature and through reverse engineering, using multiple nanoscale components, we designed and fabricated a hybrid photovoltaic device that can absorb light and efficiently convert it to electric current.

"These are early days but the possibilities for the application of this technology for environmentally-friendly energy production are very exciting."

The work was undertaken in the University of Southampton's Laboratories for Hybrid Optoelectronics.



Link: [link to www.sciencedaily.com]
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:19 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
IIT(India) boys draw power & water from sewage

KOLKATA: When the campus placements happen in 2011 at IIT Kharagpur, these five students will give it a miss. They would have by then started their own company. They have developed a bio cell' (battery) that can not only treat sewage water but also generate electricity a that could offer a one-stop solution to the water and energy crises.

Their bio-product has won them rave accolades from the ministry of science and technology and a cash award to carry their research forward.

It was while working on microbes that can be used as purifying agents that Manoj Mandelia, a fourth year student of biotech engineering, stumbled upon the idea that if a bio cell can be developed to treat sewage water for use, it would solve one of the biggest problems of the present times. Mandelia, who is pursuing an integrated M Tech programme at the institute, started looking for like minded boys for his project.

He soon found Prateek Jain (agriculture and food engineering department), Shobhit Singhal (electrical engineering), Pulkit Anand (energy engineering) and Mohan Yama (PhD student of biotechnology). Renowned biotech faculty member Debabrata Das enthusiastically joined them in the pursuit.

The idea is simple. The specially designed bio cell (LOCUS) will be set up in the form of a plant, through which the sewage water of a housing complex would be flowed in. The genius of this invention which is awaiting patent lies in the design of the cell that will automatically grow millions of anaerobic bacteria that multiply through respiration. The bacteria clean up the sewage water and in the process generate free electrons. If harnessed, these electrons can generated electricity.

"We worked on this concept for nearly a year before we readied the cell and applied to the ministry to enter its annual business plan competition that focuses on bio technology products for sustainable development," Mandelia said.

Twenty teams, mostly corporate houses dealing with bio products, participated in this premier competition. The IIT-Kgp team managed to come second and won a cash prize of Rs 3 lakh. "LOCUS is a green tech development, which is sustainable both economically and environmentally and serves as an ideal integration to address the key issues of wastewater treatment and energy gap," reads the award citation.

The cell, at this stage, can clean up 50,000 litres of sewage water, about the amount generated by 100 flats in a day. The water produced this way can be compared with that supplied provided by a civic body, the students say. "The purified water has been tested and has been certified to be clean and fit for household use. It is, however, not fit for drinking," Mandelia explained.

The IIT-Kgp team has even produced electricity with the bio cell. "A township of 100,000 people needs about 2.3 megawatts of electricity a day. It will be years before we reach that stage. But we have already been able to generate electricity. By next year, we aim to generate 350 units, enough to meet 50% of the demand of a 100-flat complex. When we say this we are not taking airconditioners into consideration," said Prateek.

Times Of India: [link to timesofindia.indiatimes.com]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 885501
United States
02/08/2010 09:26 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Interesting.

Americans could have developed this stuff, but we're too busy watching tv.
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:29 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity


Double Bonus: Bacteria Eat Pollution, Generate Electricity


Scientists have long studied bacteria that can clean up toxic waste by eating it. Other bacteria have been employed to produce electricity.

Now scientists have found a two-for-one deal in bacteria that will eat toxic chemicals 24/7 and make electricity to boot.

"The bacteria are capable of continuously generating electricity at levels that could be used to operate small electronic devices," says Charles Milliken of the Medical University of South Carolina, who conducted the research with colleague Harold May. "As long as the bacteria are fed fuel they are able to produce electricity 24 hours a day."

The findings were to be presented today at the 105th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

The new study involved Desulfitobacteria, already known for their ability to breakdown and detoxify some of the most problematic environmental pollutants, including PCBs and some chemical solvents.

"These bacteria are very diverse in their metabolic capabilities, including the food that they can consume. That means that these bacteria can convert a large number of different food sources into electricity," says Milliken. "The technology could be used to assist in the reclamation of wastewaters, thereby resulting in the removal of waste and generation of electricity."

The bacteria perform their useful tasks while in spore form, a dormant stage of growth that can handle extreme heat, radiation and lack of water -- all useful traits for an organism that might be employed in some of the worst manmade environments.

Link: [link to www.livescience.com]
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:31 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity

Waste Not: Energy from Garbage and Sewage


A hundred years ago, gas was collected from rotting sewage and used to light streetlamps. New technologies hope to update this concept -- tapping garbage was well as human waste -- for an energy-hungry world.

One promising device is called a microbial fuel cell. It makes electricity much like a hydrogen fuel cell, but it runs off wastewater. Sewage-eating bacteria drive a chemical process that generates current and, as a bonus, helps purify the water.

Bruce Logan of Pennsylvania State University and his colleagues have constructed small microbial fuel cells, no bigger than a beer can, that can power various devices, including a small fan.

"The power density is way too low to run a car," Logan admitted. But if it can be scaled up, a large microbial fuel cell would work as a sewage treatment plant.

"If you had 100,000 people and you treat their sewage, you could get up to 2.3 megawatts of continuous power, which is enough to supply electricity for 1,500 homes," Logan said. A megawatt is one million watts.

This energy could also be used to run the treatment plant itself, which would be especially beneficial in developing countries, where electricity is sometimes in short supply. Treatment plants need energy to drive pumps and to bubble oxygen through the wastewater, Logan explained.

A self-sufficient water-treatment device is also something that NASA is interested in. Bruce Rittman of Northwestern University is currently devising a microbial fuel cell that could be used on manned space missions.

"You have to recycle everything up in space," Rittman said. "You want to capture food waste and human waste, as well as recycle water."

A microbial fuel cell has some advantages over the more traditional method, called an anaerobic digester, which collects the methane, or "biogas," that bacteria belch out when they consume organic material in the absence of oxygen. The methane is later burned to turn a turbine generator.

"Instead of going through the intermediate step of combustion, a cell makes the electricity directly," Rittman said.

This direct route means that a microbial fuel cell could potentially extract more energy from a given amount of sewage. It also would avoid the pollution that burning methane produces.

But both Rittman and Logan are quick to add that cells are still early in development, whereas digesters are in use, mostly in agriculture settings where the concentration of organic material is higher than from urban sewers.

There is, however, a project to make useful products and energy from the city of San Francisco's solid organic waste. Engineers at nearby University of California, Davis, have developed a prototype anaerobic digester, which devours lawn clippings and food scraps, instead of sewage.

The prototype should be ready this fall to accept three tons of organic waste per day to make 600 kilowatt-hours of electricity - enough to supply 15 typical California homes. Plans are to funnel this recycled energy into the campus power supply, however.

[link to www.livescience.com]

[link to www.livescience.com]
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:32 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Jolted Bacteria Make Hydrogen from Human Waste

A newly developed process that uses bacteria to consume human waste and other biomass produces four times more hydrogen than previous efforts.

Some scientists and politicians envision an economy of the future fueled by hydrogen rather than fossil fuels. Others say that idea is rubbish.

The new technique won't by itself create a hydrogen economy, but it could help make wastewater treatment less costly.

"While there is likely insufficient waste biomass to sustain a global hydrogen economy, this form of renewable energy production may help offset the substantial costs of wastewater treatment as well as provide a contribution to nations able to harness hydrogen as an energy source," said Penn State Professor Bruce Logan.

The process is, well, shocking.

Bacteria already produce hydrogen. But this fermentation process has a limit. In the new study, Logan and his colleagues juiced the bacteria with a tiny amount of electricity, about 0.25 volts -- a small fraction of what's needed to run a cell phone. The supercharged bacteria could then break down acetic acid into carbon dioxide and hydrogen -- a step they could not make on their own.

A year ago, Logan's team used a microbial fuel cell for the first time to generate electricity from wastewater and the bacteria already in it.

"Basically, we use the same microbial fuel cell we developed to clean wastewater and produce electricity," Logan said. "However, to produce hydrogen, we keep oxygen out of the [microbial fuel cell] and add a small amount of power into the system."

The technique, in theory, could obtain hydrogen from any biodegradable, dissolved, organic matter, including human, agricultural or industrial wastewater while simultaneously cleaning the wastewater, Logan said.

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, but it is hard to capture and store, so producing it in a fuel cell could supply a constant stream, much like electricity is produce on demand.

Other researchers are working on ways to create new batteries using microbial fuels cells that generate power from yeast or algae.

The new work will be detailed in an upcoming issue of the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Stephen Grot, president and founder of Ion Power, Inc. is a co-author. The study was supported by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

[link to www.livescience.com]
[link to www.livescience.com]
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:34 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Interesting.

Americans could have developed this stuff, but we're too busy watching tv.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 885501



They already have ,main stream implementation is needed
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 781623
United States
02/08/2010 09:35 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Biodegradable solar cells...Amazing
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:38 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Studying a species of rock-dwelling bacteria called Shewanella, scientists have found how it can transform minerals by zapping them with tiny electrical currents. This could be the discovery of the century, as it could lead to the production of a new type of fuel cells that will generate electricity. Fuel cells will help different industries pollute less which is the most important thing for us at the moment but as well, the bacteria can help to create a new generation of organically made materials.

Bacteria can be found everywhere in nature as they have an excellent adaptability for every environment. As they can live in the absence of oxygen, scientists were puzzled for nearly half a century. Even when they found out that the micro-organisms are using rocks to generate electrons, they still couldn’t figure out how this was possible.

But after 5 years of laboratory studies in the U.S. and the UK, a team of scientists has elucidated the mystery. Shewanella has a protein on its surface that works like an electrical wire between the interior and exterior of the bacteria. The protein is called deca-heme c-class cytochromes and can bond to the surface molecules of the rock allowing in this way the transfer of electrons through the membrane. This process also releases chemical elements as iron and manganese, altering the rock.

One of the geo-chemists working on this project, Susan Brantley from the Pennsylvania State University, said that Shewanella is the key to using such bacteria in cheap electricity production but also in oil-spill cleanup.

Bio-chemist David Richardson of the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom said that Shewanella is the ideal candidate for environmental-cleanup tasks as it lives in the underground: “Understanding their biochemistry could help to develop strategies to stimulate their activities [at the cleanup sites].”

Laboratory tests have shown that other types of bacteria are also able to generate electricity making the discovery far more important.
Returner
User ID: 997
United States
02/08/2010 09:48 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Hell yeah!

Let's get this stuff planted!

Finally, some good news!
Gazing @ Orion (OP)

User ID: 885505
India
02/08/2010 09:54 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
Power from Onion Waste : Thread: Onion Power: Go Get It !!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 830674
United States
02/08/2010 09:57 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: Genetically engineered viruses injected into tobacco plants trigger the plants to grow solar cells,Bacteria cleaning sewage and generating electricity
So like Tobbaco plants grow solar cells yet "Morgellons" that grows wierd synthetic like fibers out the human body how can that not be man made also????

News