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The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!

 
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User ID: 758950
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02/05/2010 01:11 PM
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The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
Ladies and gentlemen, as Vonnegut would say, the excrement is hitting the A/C unit.

I’ve mentioned more than once in these essays the foreshortening effect that textbook history can have on our understanding of the historical events going on around us. The stark chronologies most of us get fed in school can make it hard to remember that even the most drastic social changes happen over time, amid the fabric of everyday life and a flurry of events that can seem more important at the time.



This becomes especially problematic in times like the present, when apocalyptic prophecy is a central trope in the popular culture that frames a people’s hopes and fears for the future. When the collective imagination becomes obsessed with the dream of a sudden cataclysm that sweeps away the old world overnight and ushers in the new, even relatively rapid social changes can pass by unnoticed. The twilight years of Rome offer a good object lesson; so many people were convinced that the Second Coming might occur at any moment that the collapse of classical civilization went almost unnoticed; only a tiny handful of writers from those years show any recognition that something out of the ordinary was happening at all.



Reflections of this sort have been much on my mind lately, and there’s a reason for that. Scattered among the statistical noise that makes up most of today’s news are data points that suggest to me that business as usual is quietly coming to an end around us, launching us into a new world for which very few of us have made any preparations at all.



Here’s one example. Friends of mine in a couple of midwestern states have mentioned that the steady trickle of refugees from the Chicago slums into their communities has taken a sharp turn up. There’s a long history of dysfunction behind this. Back in 1999, Chicago began tearing down its vast empire of huge high-rise projects, promising to replace them with less ghastly and more widely distributed housing for the poor. Most of the replacements, of course, never got built. When the waiting list for Section 8 rent subsidies, the only other option available, got long enough to become a public relations problem, the bureaucrats in charge simply closed the list to new applicants; rumors (hotly denied by the Chicago city government) claim that poor families in Chicago were openly advised to move to other states. Whether for that reason or simple economic survival, a fair number of them did.



Fast forward to the middle of 2009. Around then, facing budget deficits second only to California, the state of Illinois quietly stopped paying its social service providers. In theory, the money is still allocated; in practice, it’s been more than six months since Illinois preschools, senior centers, food banks, and the like have received a check from the state for the services they provide, and many of them are on the verge of going broke. Subsidized rent has apparently taken an equivalent hit. Believers in free-market economics have been insisting for years that the end of rent subsidies would let the free market reduce rents to a level that people could afford, but I don’t recommend holding your breath; this is the same free market, remember, that gave the United States some of the world’s worst slums in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.



The actual effects have been instructive. Squeezed between sharply contracting benefits and a sharply contracting job market, many of Chicago’s poor are hitting the road, heading in any direction that offers more options. Forget the survivalist fantasy of violent hordes pouring out of the inner cities to ravage everything in their path; today’s slum residents are instead becoming the Okies of the Great Recession. In the process, part of business as usual in the United States is coming to an end.



Illinois is far from the only state that backed itself into a corner by assuming that rising tax revenues from a bubble economy could be extrapolated indefinitely into the future. 41 US states currently face budget deficits. California has received most of the media attention so far, a good deal of it focused on the political gridlock that has kept the state frozen in crisis for years. Behind the partisan posturing in Sacramento, though, lies a deeper and harsher reality. The state of California is essentially bankrupt; nearly all the mistakes made by the once-wealthy states of the Rust Belt as they slid down the curve of their own decline have been faithfully copied by California as it approaches its destiny as the Rust Belt of the 21st century. I wonder how many local governments in neighboring states have drawn up plans for dealing with the tide of economic refugees once California can no longer pay for its welfare system, and the poor of Los Angeles and other California cities join those of Chicago on the road?



I could go on, but I think the point has been made. State governments are the canaries in our national coal mine; their tax receipts are one of the very few measures of economic activity that aren’t being systematically fiddled by the federal government. The figures coming out of state revenue offices strike a jarring contrast with the handwaving about “green shoots” and an imminent return to prosperity heard from Washington DC and the media. Across the country, every few months, states that have already cut spending drastically to cope with record declines in tax income find that they have to go back and do it all over again, because their revenue – and by inference, the incomes, purchases, business activity, and other economic phenomena that feed into taxes – has dropped even further. Now it’s true that state budgets get hit whenever the economy goes into recession, and keep on hurting even when the recession is supposed to be over, but compared to past examples, the losses clobbering state funding these days are off the scale, and a great many programs that have been fixtures of American public life for as long as most of us have been living are facing the chopping block.



A different reality pertains within the Washington DC beltway. Where states that fail to balance their budgets get their bond ratings cut and, in some cases, are having trouble finding buyers for their debt at less than usurious interest rates, the federal government seems to be able to defy the normal behavior of bond markets with impunity. Despite soaring deficits, not to mention a growing disinclination on the part of foreign governments to keep on financing the same, every new issuance of US treasury bills somehow finds buyers in such abundance that interest rates stay remarkably low. A few weeks ago, Tom Whipple of ASPO became the latest in a tolerably large number of perceptive observers who have pointed out that this makes sense only if the US government is surreptitiously buying its own debt.



The process works something like this. The Federal Reserve, which is not actually a government agency but a consortium of large banks working under a Federal charter, has the statutory right to mint money in the US. These days, that can be done by a few keystrokes on a computer, and another few keystrokes can transfer that money to any bank in the nation. Some of those banks use the money to buy up US treasury bills, probably by way of subsidiaries chartered in the Cayman Islands and the like, and these same subsidiaries then stash the T-bills and keep them off the books. The money thus laundered finally arrives at the US treasury, where it gets spent.



It may be a bit more complex than that. Those huge sums of money voted by Congress to bail out the financial system may well have been diverted into this process – that would certainly explain why the Department of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York have stonewalled every attempt to trace exactly where all that money went. Friendly foreign governments may also have a hand in the process. One way or another, though, those of my readers who remember the financial engineering that got Enron its fifteen minutes of fame may find all this uncomfortably familiar – and it is. The world’s largest economy has become, in effect, the United States of Enron.



Plenty of countries in the past have tried to cover expenses that overshot income by spinning the presses at the local mint. The result is generally hyperinflation, of the sort made famous in the 1920s by Germany and more recently by Zimbabwe. That I know of, though, nobody has tried the experiment with a national economy in a steep deflationary depression, of the sort that has been taking shape in America and elsewhere since the real estate bubble crashed and burned in 2008. In theory, at least in the short term, it might just work; the inflationary pressures caused by printing money wholesale could conceivably cancel out the deflationary pressures of a collapsing bubble and a contracting economy – at least for a while.



The difficulty, of course, is that pumping the money supply fixes the symptoms of economic failure without treating the causes, and in every case I know of, governments that resort to it end up caught on a treadmill that requires ever larger infusions of paper money just to maintain the status quo. Sooner or later, as the amount of currency in circulation outstrips the goods and services available to buy, inflation spins out of control, the currency loses most or all of its value, and the economy grinds to a halt until a new currency can be issued on some sounder basis. In 1920s Germany, they managed this last feat by taking out a mortgage on the entire country, and issued “Rentenmarks” backed by that mortgage. In the wake of the late housing bubble, that seems an unlikely option here, though no doubt some gimmick will be found.



It’s crucial to realize, though, that this move comes at the end of a long historical trajectory. From the early days of the industrial revolution into the early 1970s, the United States possessed the immense economic advantage of sizeable reserves of whatever the cutting-edge energy source happened to be. During what Lewis Mumford called the eotechnic era, when waterwheels were the prime mover for industry and canals were the core transportation technology, the United States prospered because it had an abundance of mill sites and internal waterways. During Mumford’s paleotechnic era, when coal and railways replaced water and canal boats, the United States once again found itself blessed with huge coal reserves, and the arrival of the neotechnic era, when petroleum and highways became the new foundation of power, the United States found that nature had supplied it with so much oil that in 1950, it produced more petroleum than all other countries combined.



That trajectory came to an abrupt end in the 1970s, when nuclear power – expected by nearly everyone to be the next step in the sequence – turned out to be hopelessly uneconomical, and renewables proved unable to take up the slack. The neotechnic age, in effect, turned out to have no successor. Since then, for most of the last thirty years, the United States has been trying to stave off the inevitable – the sharp downward readjustment of our national standard of living and international importance following the peak and decline of our petroleum production and the depletion of most of the other natural resources that once undergirded American economic and political power. We’ve tried accelerating drawdown of natural resources; we’ve tried abandoning our national infrastructure, our industries, and our agricultural hinterlands; we’ve tried building ever more baroque systems of financial gimmickry to prop up our decaying economy with wealth from overseas; over the last decade and a half, we’ve resorted to systematically inflating speculative bubbles – and now, with our backs to the wall, we’re printing money as though there’s no tomorrow.



Now it’s possible that the current US administration will be able to pull one more rabbit out of its hat, and find a new gimmick to keep things going for a while longer. I have to confess that this does not look likely to me. Monetizing the national debt, as economists call the attempt to pay a nation’s bills by means of a hyperactive printing press, is a desperation move; it’s hard to imagine any reason that it would have been chosen if there were any other option in sight.



What this means, if I’m right, is that we may have just moved into the endgame of America’s losing battle with the consequences of its own history. For many years now, people in the peak oil scene – and the wider community of those concerned about the future, to be sure – have had, or thought they had, the luxury of ample time to make plans and take action. Every so often books would be written and speeches made claiming that something had to be done right away, while there was still time, but most people took that as the rhetorical flourish it usually was, and went on with their lives in the confident expectation that the crisis was still a long ways off.



We may no longer have that option. If I read the signs correctly, America has finally reached the point where its economy is so deep into overshoot that catabolic collapse is beginning in earnest. If so, a great many of the things most of us in this country have treated as permanent fixtures are likely to go away over the years immediately before us, as the United States transforms itself into a Third World country. The changes involved won’t be sudden, and it seems unlikely that most of them will get much play in the domestic mass media; a decade from now, let’s say, when half the American workforce has no steady work, decaying suburbs have mutated into squalid shantytowns, and domestic insurgencies flare across the south and the mountain West, those who still have access to cable television will no doubt be able to watch talking heads explain how we’re all better off than we were in 2000.



Those of my readers who haven’t already been beggared by the unraveling of what’s left of the economy, and have some hope of keeping a roof over their heads for the foreseeable future, might be well advised to stock their pantries, clear their debts, and get to know their neighbors, if they haven’t taken these sensible steps already. Those of my readers who haven’t taken the time already to learn a practical skill or two, well enough that others might be willing to pay or barter for the results, had better get a move on. Those of my readers who want to see some part of the heritage of the present saved for the future, finally, may want to do something practical about that, and soon. I may be wrong – and to be frank, I hope that I’m wrong – but it looks increasingly to me as though we’re in for a very rough time in the very near future.
 Quoting: LifeAfterThePeakOilCrash


[link to www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net]

hiding
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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02/05/2010 01:24 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
c'mon! this is a good essay. surely someone out there can say something about it that will start a conversation on it so it doesn't just disappear into the GLP abyss.

so somebody comment on it.

bump
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 01:26 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
bump
for interesting content
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 01:28 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
O K... no mispelled words and I like the blue background... but it's already been said... what more is there to say???
going... going... GONE!
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 01:30 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
too much shit to read
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 01:32 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
Sorry OP this mythical crash you have a hard on for will not happen.

You are just going to have to man up and work for a living like the rest of us.
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 01:34 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
Yep I'll agree with this OP.
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 01:41 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
amazing insight, a must read... Put's our nations history in a good perspective.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 793891
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02/05/2010 01:47 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
Well, it seems to pretty much sum it up. The only part I disagreed with was
"this is the same free market, remember, that gave the United States some of the world’s worst slums in the late 19th and early 20th centuries."

Please, there are much worse housing conditions in the world than our slums.

What was discussed about the states is true, they have no printing press and their governments will have to adjust meaning more unemployment and even less and less revenue.

If we have a recovery, we will get massive inflation and interest rates will soar. Unfortunately that is the best case outcome. I don't even see anything to start a recovery.
Either way we are fucked.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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02/05/2010 01:49 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
Sorry OP this mythical crash you have a hard on for will not happen.

You are just going to have to man up and work for a living like the rest of us.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 872204


banana2
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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02/05/2010 01:50 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
The only part I disagreed with was
"this is the same free market, remember, that gave the United States some of the world’s worst slums in the late 19th and early 20th centuries."

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 793891

maybe he was referring to the slums of Uptan Sinclair's "The Jungle" which is a good book and probably a decent primer on what we're headed for

i could be wrong
Anonymous Coward
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02/05/2010 02:27 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
the United States of Enron, running the printing presses, buying its' own debt, fudging the socalled data on everything like today's "seasonally adjusted" unemployment numbers, when, in the states, 480000 new claims for benefits were filed last week, the DOL claims the "rate" went down to 9.7%--while the dow drops below 9900 in response to this laughable lie pushed by the inept Obama goons

when the people no longer trust government pronouncements to be accurate, true, and reflect reality, the unraveling of society is close at hand
Cat Man
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02/05/2010 05:57 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
The OP wrote a very well thought out piece. Yes I believe we are living in the end of The United States as we know it; or the end of the Empire of The United States. What will replace it is still an unknown. I still think the article written by that Russian Professor prophesying the breakup of the United States into various pieces is possible. Whether some of these pieces will be ruled by petty dictators is anyone's guess but my guess is some of them will be. When a government collapses due to a economic collapse there is always a power vacuum to fill. These vacuums can be filled by various means, but temporary dictatorships such as what happened in Germany during the 1930' is a very real possibility. History goes in cycles. A country grows into wealth and power then spreads into an empire. After several centuries they always go into some sort of collapse and decay. The United States is a very young country. We have yet to follow into the footsteps of the collapse of various other empires over time. The time for our very first collapse is at hand. How long we will go into a period of darkness before some sections of our country will go into a rebirth is unknown. History goes much faster now days due to the increase in technology the world has seen over the last 110 years. I feel because of this technological factor the dark age in our immediate future will be much shorter than those in the past. Namely what took 800 years to get over in the past might only take 50 or 100 in the future. As the OP said it's technological progress that shot the United States up in a short 130 year time to become a superpower, and it will be technological progress in the future that will get us out of our mess in the future. But like I said this will take time, maybe 50 to 100 years. Then perhaps our country will be able to reunite itself and go into another golden age of prosperity. Anything is possible. Let us always think positive about our long range future.
htp,nli
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02/05/2010 07:18 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
This supports something I have thought: doom is not sudden, it is ongoing. The wind down of the Roman Empire took something like 300 years. We are in the middle of it, and we have a hard time seeing it. We can sense it at some level.

I think the urge for sudden doom is very normal. Most would prefer a quick death, rather than a slow, agonizing crawl toward the grave.

One thing we do have here in the U.S. is some of the best agricultural land in the world. IMO we are going to have to return to a much more agrarian society. I would like to see a new Homestead Act type of policy that moves people back onto the land. Small farms where people raise most of their own food, like it used to be.

Look at the Amish. Since they have not bought into the modern paradigm, they will have a great head start, and from them we may find the model for a new society.
htp,nli
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02/05/2010 07:23 PM
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Re: The Collapse is ON! We've passed the point of no return. You have lived to see the day!
The only part I disagreed with was
"this is the same free market, remember, that gave the United States some of the world’s worst slums in the late 19th and early 20th centuries."


maybe he was referring to the slums of Uptan Sinclair's "The Jungle" which is a good book and probably a decent primer on what we're headed for

i could be wrong
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 758950


He did say late 19th/early 20th century. And he was right. American ghettos of that era were nightmarish, to say the least.

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