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Gravity Is 'Unwinding' an Alien Planet,shortened it's orbit , reduced it's size,eclipses it and draws it towards a Dark Companion

 
Monarch
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Gravity Is 'Unwinding' an Alien Planet,shortened it's orbit , reduced it's size,eclipses it and draws it towards a Dark Companion
I will make 3 posts which will include the history on each new finding on this star, you need to read all 3 to understand the scope of the event with this star.
This is supposedly visible to the naked eye when not in the 18 month stage of eclipse (Aug. 2009 to approx. Feb. 2011), which happens every 27.1 years. But many changes are taking place and they expect a "Fireworks" stellar event within a few decades that will make it one of the brightest things in the sky visible to the naked eye.
The gravity is changing, they have noticed an orbit change andhave found a "Dark" companion. They expect one to over take the other, eventually.
So far they have'nt seemed to have a definite understanding of this star, or the circumstances around the anomalies and excelleration of effects it's experincing (my guess is that they may not be on target about it taking a couple of decades either.
I suggest reading all 3 posts and taking note of what this star is doing. Who knows, maybe it will give us some clues on what a "Binary Star's" behavior might be if being influenced by another body ( ;} ), or any other influences that might be experienced in the whole cosmos by an event of larger proportions, galactically! Take notice!


[link to www.foxnews.com]



Gravity Is 'Unwinding' an Alien Planet
By Charles Q. Choi
- Space.com

The gravity of an alien star is causing its planet to unwind, research now reveals.


The gravity of an alien star is causing its planet to unwind, research now reveals.

The world in question is WASP-12b, the only known planet circling the yellow sun-like star WASP-12 some 867 light-years from Earth. This gas giant is so close to its host star that it takes just 26 hours to orbit it and complete a year.

Unsurprisingly, given its closeness to its star, WASP-12b is scorching hot. At some 4,000 degrees F, it's nearly half as hot as the surface of our sun.

Strangely, WASP-12b, which is roughly 1.4 times Jupiter's mass, is unexpectedly large compared with most gas giants of similar mass and distance from their stars. Its diameter is some 3.6 times Jupiter's.

Now scientists find the heat from the star is not enough to explain the planet's inflated size. Instead, the gravity of the star appears responsible.

On Earth, the moon's gravity causes tides. On WASP-12b, the tidal forces due to its star are far greater, and the energy is dissipated in the planet in the form of heat.

"Whereas tidal force on the Earth leads to a few meter changes in the height of the ocean surface, that on WASP-12b is 10 million times larger," said researcher Shu-lin Li, an astrophysicist at Peking University in Beijing.

In fact, WASP-12b is getting inflated so much that its atmosphere is escaping, losing an amount roughly equal to a thousandth of our moon's mass every year.

"We are witnessing the ongoing disruption and death march of a planet," Li said.

The researchers predict this gas is flowing toward the host star, forming a tenuous disk that should emit heat detectable by the Hubble or Spitzer Space Telescopes. They also calculate that an as-yet unseen planet roughly 5 to 10 times Earth's mass — a "super-Earth" — might be influencing WASP-12b's orbit.

The scientists detailed their findings in the February 25 issue of the journal Nature.

Last Edited by Monarch on 02/25/2010 04:11 PM
John 3:16 (Amplified Bible)
“For God so greatly loved and dearly prized the world that He [even] gave up His only begotten ([a]unique) Son, so that whoever believes in (trusts in, clings to, relies on) Him shall not perish (come to destruction, be lost) but have eternal (everlasting) life.

A prudent person foresees the danger ahead and takes precautions;the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences-Proverbs22:3
<><


[link to www.teslasociety.com]

U.S. Supreme Court decision (Case #369 decided June 21, 1943)

[link to www.ntesla.org]
Monarch (OP)

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02/25/2010 04:09 PM
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Re: Gravity Is 'Unwinding' an Alien Planet,shortened it's orbit , reduced it's size,eclipses it and draws it towards a Dark Companion
[link to news.nationalgeographic.com]

Yearlong Star Eclipse May Help Solve Space Mystery

Victoria Jaggard in Washington, D.C.

National Geographic News

January 5, 2010

While relatively few people were looking, an unusual eclipse darkened New Year's Day.

On January 1 a giant space object blotted out our view of Epsilon Aurigae, a yellow supergiant star about 2,000 light-years from Earth. Based on studies of Epsilon Aurigae's previous eclipses, astronomers expect the star won't fully regain its bright shine until early 2011.

Normally the star is so bright it can be seen with the naked eye even by city dwellers. For all but the most rural star-gazers, though, the mystery object that eclipses the star causes it to vanish for about 18 months every 27.1 years.

Ever since the star's periodic eclipses were first recorded in 1821, astronomers have been puzzling over how Epsilon Aurigae pulls off its lengthy disappearing act.

Now, "using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we've reached a solution to a nearly two-century-old mystery," study leader Don Hoard, of the California Institute of Technology, said today at an American Astronomical Association press briefing in Washington, D.C.

According to the new model, Epsilon Aurigae is a dying star being orbited by another star, and that stellar dance partner is cloaked in a wide disk of dark dust.

Based on the new Spitzer data, Hoard's team thinks the eclipse lasts so long because the dark disk is about 744,000,000 miles (1,197,351,936 kilometers) across—eight times as wide as the distance from Earth to the sun.

Star Detectives

Binary star systems have long been known to cause stellar eclipses as seen from Earth. Epsilon Aurigae is unusual, though, because it has the longest lasting known eclipse.

The 18-month eclipse started last August, but it took the disk until now to fully obscure Epsilon Aurigae.

"If the eclipse was simply being caused by another [darker] star passing in front of the visible star, it shouldn't last that long," Hoard said.

Astronomers had suggested in the 1950s that whatever is passing in front of Epsilon Aurigae is masked by a disk of material.

The new Spitzer data, combined with readings of other light waves from ground and space-based observatories, suggest that the star inside the disk is a B-type, a blue star three times as hot as our sun.

At first, the team wasn't sure how to explain the readings.

Assuming Epsilon Aurigae is as massive as other similar stars, a lone B star, Hoard said, shouldn't be massive enough to generate enough gravity for the binary pair to orbit they way they do.

"So then we started thinking, Well, we need more mass but no more light" in the system for the disk model to work, he said.

The team started by wondering whether something else might join the B star at the center of the disk.

A black hole would add the mass the scientists thought was needed, but it would also add more light than has been observed in the system. That's because a black hole would gobble up matter from the disk, then spit it out in the form of detectable radiation. (Related: "Black Hole's "Jet Power" Revealed.")

Perhaps, though, the object in the disk wasn't the problem at all, the astronomers thought, but rather Epsilon Aurigae itself.

"So we back up for a minute and say, OK, what if [Epsilon Aurigae] is not a massive supergiant star? What if it's a low-mass … dying star?" Hoard said.

Such a star "can be big, but it doesn't have to have a lot of mass," Hoard said.

"And if we start with that assumption, everything just falls nicely into place."

In other words, the model of a large but low-mass star orbited by a B star shrouded in dust matches the centuries of data collected so far on Epsilon Aurigae—potentially explaining once and for all how the long, strange eclipse is possible.

"Details Need to Be Worked Out"

Other experts, however, are not quite ready to close the case file.

"Don says that we've solved it. I disagree," said Arne Henden, director of the nonprofit American Association of Variable Star Observers.

Even with the new model, he argued, the Epsilon Aurigae system is full of mysteries, such as the structure and composition of the supposed dark disk.

"What is the nature of this dusty disk? These are things you normally see around young stellar objects," said Henden, who is also a senior research scientist for the Universities Space Research Association at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona.

But the blue star in the new model would be much older, and its dusty disk seems to be filled with unusually large particles.

"There are still a lot of details that need to be worked out," study leader Hoard agreed.

Backyard Astronomers to the Rescue?

Both astronomers hope that during the current Epsilon Aurigae eclipse, modern technology combined with extensive public participation will help answer the lingering riddles.

Henden's star-observer organization is helping to organize a project called Citizen Sky, in which backyard astronomers are being trained to monitor Epsilon Aurigae's eclipse from start to finish.

Since the project's launch last September, more than 120 people in 19 countries have already submitted data.

"Technology has evolved tremendously since the last eclipse [in 1984], and amateur astronomers are able to get exquisite detail on a nightly basis," Henden said.

Aside from engaging the public in astronomy, he added, the Citizen Sky project "shows that classical astronomy"—using earthbound, optical telescopes—"is still alive and well."
John 3:16 (Amplified Bible)
“For God so greatly loved and dearly prized the world that He [even] gave up His only begotten ([a]unique) Son, so that whoever believes in (trusts in, clings to, relies on) Him shall not perish (come to destruction, be lost) but have eternal (everlasting) life.

A prudent person foresees the danger ahead and takes precautions;the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences-Proverbs22:3
<><


[link to www.teslasociety.com]

U.S. Supreme Court decision (Case #369 decided June 21, 1943)

[link to www.ntesla.org]
Monarch (OP)

User ID: 895609
United States
02/25/2010 04:09 PM
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Re: Gravity Is 'Unwinding' an Alien Planet,shortened it's orbit , reduced it's size,eclipses it and draws it towards a Dark Companion
[link to news.nationalgeographic.com]


Star "Fireworks" Expected From Strange Eclipsing System

Ker Than
for National Geographic News

June 5, 2008
A celestial threesome seems poised to create a stellar light show that should be visible from Earth within a few decades, astronomers announced this week.

At the heart of the drama sits Epsilon Aurigae, a supergiant F-type star that is considered one of the most unusual objects in the sky.

Even though it is about 242 million miles (389 million kilometers) wide, Epsilon Aurigae is totally eclipsed every 27 years by an even bigger disk-shaped neighbor.

(See a related photo of a March 29, 2006, solar eclipse as seen by the crew of the International Space Station.)

Astronomers don't know what the star's colossal partner is, but one leading theory suggests it's a gas cloud more than a thousand times as wide as the sun that harbors two small stars at its core.

Alternatively the object at the center of the cloud may be a black hole or a single larger star that has somehow siphoned gas from Epsilon Aurigae to create an enveloping cloak of darkness.

Each eclipse lasts nearly two years, by far the longest in any known binary star system. The next eclipse starts in August 2009 and should run through May 2011.

But marked changes in the behavior of the massive star and its enigmatic companion suggest that a third object is about to crash the affair.

"It has prospects to produce a bit of fireworks by mid-century," said Robert Stencel, an astronomy professor at the University of Denver.

Shrinking Orbit

Epsilon Aurigae is a variable star, which means it has a cycle of brightening and dimming.

But this cycle has sped up in recent years, from 96 days a decade ago to about 67 days now.

"Why it should be speeding up is not obvious," Stencel said.

"It's a simple extrapolation to say that if over the course of one decade we see this much change, then within a few decades some kind of punctuation may be coming along."

Observations during the last eclipse also suggest Epsilon Aurigae is shrinking by about half a percent a year.

Stencel thinks that a third object in the system—possibly a planet embryo, or planetesimal—is spiraling toward the supergiant or the stars at the center of the eclipsing object.

As its orbit shrinks, the planetesimal passes in front of Epsilon Aurigae more frequently, which could explain the shortening of the bright-dim cycle.

Eventually the planet embryo would crash into the star or its partner.

This would create bright flares like those seen in some types of interacting stellar binaries or recurring novas, where one star draws gas from its companion until it passes a critical mass limit and explodes.

Such flares in the Epsilon Aurigae system would cause a brightening visible to observers on Earth with the naked eye.

"That could pop it up to become one of the brightest objects in the sky," said Stencel, who presented his theory this week at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in St. Louis, Missouri.

Public Invitation

Edward Guinan is an astrophysicist at Villanova University in Pennsylvania who was not involved in the study. He called Stencel's idea "plausible but unusual."

If the dark companion is receiving material from an external source like a planetesimal, it could reach a mass limit where it becomes unstable, Guinan said.

"The inner part of the disk could explode onto whatever is at its center," Guinan told National Geographic News.

New instruments that were unavailable during the system's 1982-1984 eclipse could allow astronomers to get their first glimpse of the dark object this time around.

Stencel is drafting proposals to gain observing time with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other instruments to focus on the system.

And he and his colleagues are urging public participation in the upcoming eclipse.

"We're trying to promote the idea that here's this singular event kind of on the scale of a Halley's comet," Stencel said.

"We invite people to observe it and report to their local science centers and help us collect some data."
John 3:16 (Amplified Bible)
“For God so greatly loved and dearly prized the world that He [even] gave up His only begotten ([a]unique) Son, so that whoever believes in (trusts in, clings to, relies on) Him shall not perish (come to destruction, be lost) but have eternal (everlasting) life.

A prudent person foresees the danger ahead and takes precautions;the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences-Proverbs22:3
<><


[link to www.teslasociety.com]

U.S. Supreme Court decision (Case #369 decided June 21, 1943)

[link to www.ntesla.org]

News