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South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*

 
Anonymous Coward
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05/21/2010 06:58 AM
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South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
[link to www.theglobeandmail.com]

Clinton says evidence ‘overwhelming’ in Korean warship sinking

Matthew Lee

Tokyo — The Associated Press
Published on Friday, May. 21, 2010 6:42AM EDT

Last updated on Friday, May. 21, 2010 6:43AM EDT


.Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday that evidence was “overwhelming” that a North Korean submarine sank a South Korean warship and that the communist country must face international consequences for its actions.

Speaking in the Japanese capital at the outset of a three-nation Asian trip, Ms. Clinton said the U.S., Japan, South Korea and China are consulting on an appropriate reaction to an international investigation that blamed North Korea for the incident.

She said the report proves a North Korean sub fired a torpedo that sank the ship, the Cheonan, in March and that it could no longer be “business as usual” in dealing with the matter.

While it was “premature” to discuss exact options or actions that will be taken in response, Ms. Clinton said it was “important to send a clear message to North Korea that provocative actions have consequences.”

“The evidence is overwhelming and condemning. The torpedo that sunk the Cheonan ... was fired by a North Korean submarine,” she told reporters at a joint press conference with Japanese Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada.

“We cannot allow this attack on South Korea to go unanswered by the international community,” she said. “This will not be and cannot be business as usual. There must be an international, not just a regional, but an international response.”

North Korea denies it was responsible for the sinking and has threatened to retaliate against any attempt to punish it with “all-out war.”

Ms. Clinton's Asian tour, which will also take her to China and South Korea, was supposed to focus on U.S.-China economic issues. But that was before she left Washington and Thursday's release of the report that concluded that a North Korean sub had torpedoed a South Korean corvette on March 26, splitting the vessel in two and killing 46 sailors.

Input from the three countries will be key to determining an appropriate response, especially with fears that too tough a reaction could provoke new hostilities or spark chaos in the region. The Obama administration has said it wants South Korea to lead the way in coming up with possible responses.

Underscoring the concern, U.S. officials have refused to call the North's attack on the ship an act of war or state-sponsored terror, warning that an overreaction could cause the Korean peninsula to “explode.”

U.S. officials said they would explore diplomatic steps through the U.N. or increase Washington's unilateral sanctions against North Korea's Soviet-style state.

At an emergency national security meeting Friday in Seoul, South Korean President Lee Myung-bak said his country was caught in a “perfect military ambush” but called for a cautious response to the sinking. Mr. Lee said the attack violated the UN Charter as well as the truce that ended the fighting in the 1950-53 Korean War.

Ms. Clinton's main task during her time in Beijing may be trying to persuade the Chinese to support U.N. Security Council action against North Korea. The Chinese have the most leverage over the reclusive regime, and Beijing's support for any international response to Pyongyang will be critical to its success.

Chinese officials have appealed for calm. Vice Foreign Minister Cui Tiankai called the sinking “unfortunate.” But he stopped short of backing Seoul in the growing dispute, instead reiterating China's long-standing views on the need to maintain peace on the peninsula.

Ms. Clinton said Tokyo and Washington were seeking to resolve a dispute over the relocation of a key Marine base on the southern island of Okinawa by the end-of-May deadline that Japan's prime minister has set.

The Tokyo government has said it would like to move Futenma Marine air field off the island, which already hosts more than half the 47,000 U.S. troops stationed in Japan, but hasn't found a suitable alternative.

“We both seek an arrangement that is operationally viable and politically sustainable. The goal of our governments remains unchanged. We want to maintain the security of Japan and the stability of the region,” Ms. Clinton said.

“We have committed to redoubling our efforts to meet the deadline that has been announced by the Japanese government.”

Mr. Okada, the foreign minister, said the two sides were working together and that Tokyo would “make the utmost efforts to gain the understanding of the Okinawan people.”

[link to www.humanevents.com]

Torpedo Sunk South Korean Ship

A preliminary investigation into the March 26 sinking of the South Korean warship Cheonan has found it was caused by a torpedo. That finding has shifted the probe to determine why Cheonan failed to make sonar contact with the torpedo, or the submarine that launched it, and the type of torpedo used.

One disturbing theory being examined is whether North Korea introduced a new kind of torpedo—one unlike any other ever used.

The evolution of submarine warfare has been a cat-and-mouse game in which a technological advantage can turn the hunter into the hunted. The March 26 incident may now give the submarine the advantage.

The South Korean government will soon release the results of an investigation into Cheonan’s loss, conducted with the help of an international team of experts. Broken in half, the ship's wreckage lay in shallow water, making recovery relatively easy. Thus, it was quickly determined its loss was caused by an explosion external to the ship's hull.

Accordingly, the focus shifted to whether a mine, torpedo or kamikaze mini-submarine was responsible. Metal remnants found on the seafloor proved helpful to investigators in establishing it was a torpedo.

In examining Cheonan’s hull, of note was the absence of heat exposure or a hole of the sort normally caused by contact explosives. In other words, the lethal blow was delivered by a non-contact explosion occurring underneath the ship, generating a powerful shock wave and high-pressure gas bubble called a “bubble jet.” This bubble jet caused the ship repeatedly to rise and fall, until it snapped in two.

With metal torpedo remnants discovered, the focus shifted to why Cheonan failed to establish sonar contact and the type of torpedo used—the latter being critical to shedding light on where it was manufactured and, ultimately, who launched it.

The shallow waters where Cheonan went down, combined with the noise generated in that busy shipping lane, may have impaired sonar detection.

But there is another possibility. Cheonan was patrolling waters near a disputed border—waters it routinely sailed. Knowing this, Pyongyang could have, on many occasions prior to March 26, positioned a submarine to lie still on the sea floor as patrol ships passed. By doing so, repeated South Korean patrols coming across it in the same location may have simply learned to accept it as wreckage or some other non-threatening contact. Thus, on March 26, that same contact would have been ignored by Cheonan's crew as a North Korean submarine crew prepared to launch the fatal torpedo.

As to the type of torpedo, there are two possibilities—a "heavy torpedo," with which all North Korean submarines are known to be armed, or a "supercavitation torpedo," a devastatingly effective weapon known to be possessed by countries with interests adverse to the U.S. South Korean sonar men are better trained to identify the acoustics signature of an incoming heavy torpedo, which is easier to detect, than a supercavitation torpedo, which requires special adjustments to the sonar system to do so.

But both torpedoes are deadly—the supercavitating even more so as its design incorporates a law of physics loophole that makes detection and escape by a targeted ship virtually impossible. And, as of today, no defense exists against it. Both types are capable of generating non-contact bubble jet explosions underneath a target.

A heavy torpedo cutting through the water is governed by the laws of physics—its underwater speed limited to between 40-50 mph. China, which manufactures such a weapon—a passive acoustics homing torpedo called the Yu-3—is known to sell them to North Korea.

This "speed limit" on heavy torpedoes in water exists because traveling through a dense medium, friction and turbulence above this rotational speed of the propeller will cause it to rip apart. To go any faster, a torpedo, or any underwater vehicle, would need to cut through the water absent such friction and turbulence.

In the 1960's, a Soviet scientist sought to convert this disadvantage into an advantage. He hit upon the concept of "cavitation" or forming a partial vacuum within a liquid by a swiftly moving solid body. In a nutshell, supercavitation involves creating a gas bubble within which an underwater vehicle can ride, totally protected from this friction. The concept exists in practice today in the form of a Russian-made supercavitation torpedo—the "Shkval," capable of traveling at speeds of 200 mph. Its only weakness is its very limited eight-mile range.

A torpedo capable of reaching such speeds poses a severe threat to the U.S. Navy. Even if detected, it provides the target ship, running at speeds of approximately 30 knots, no time to outmaneuver it.

Interestingly, the Shkval already has claimed an earlier, albeit unintended, victim. On August 12, 2000, while operating in the Barents Sea with 118 crewmen aboard, a mysterious explosion sank the Russian submarine Kursk (K-141). As some crewmembers survived the explosion and awaited rescue on the seafloor, Moscow—lacking adequate rescue and recovery assets to save them—repeatedly rejected international offers of help. Delays resulted.

Moscow's delay ultimately claimed the lives of the few surviving crewmen. We now know the Russian refusal stemmed from concern supercavitation torpedoes onboard Kursk would be discovered. It was probably the premature detonation, after launch, of a Shkval during a training exercise that sank the Kursk. The Russians later went to extreme efforts to ultimately recover Kursk, tow her back and dismantle her.

Our Russian "friends" have sold Shkval torpedoes to the Iranians—as well as submarines from which to launch them. The Russians believed Shkval could not be reversed engineered. They were wrong. Today, Iran manufactures its own supercavitating torpedo, claiming it can reach speeds in excess of Shkval's.

If a supercavitating torpedo sank Cheonan, it is more likely the North Koreans obtained it from Iran than Russia. Pyongyang has been providing Tehran with assistance on its nuclear weapons program; accordingly, Tehran would feel an obligation to reciprocate in some measure.

Another piece of evidence concerning torpedo type is based on an analysis of acoustics data generated at the time of Cheonan's loss. (It would be surprising if this data was not obtained from South Korean underwater listening devices similar to those planted by the U.S. to monitor Soviet submarine activity during the Cold war.)

From this data, it appears an object approached the ship at 40 mph and effected a non-contact explosion eight feet below Cheonan with equivalent power of 450 pounds of TNT. A slower approach speed would suggest Cheonan's fate was sealed by a heavy torpedo. Hopefully, the data will also reveal whether the torpedo was launched from a larger submarine—necessary for a heavy torpedo—or a mini-sub, making use of a supercavitation torpedo possible.

There is little doubt Cheonan's demise was met with cheers in four world capitals where leaders saw it as a precursor to the demise of American naval dominance. Obviously, rejoicing took place in Pyongyang for pulling off its dastardly deed. In Beijing, cheers went up over what possibly was the first successful kill by its heavy torpedo. And, in both Moscow and Tehran there was recognition, that if a heavy torpedo was used with such success, their supercavitating torpedoes will be unstoppable against the US Navy.
Anonymous Coward
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05/21/2010 07:03 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
kim drevil
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05/21/2010 07:05 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
bump
<<LOOK`n thru YOU>>

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05/21/2010 07:06 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
I would say NK probably did it but I could think of why a few others who may have done it and placed the blame on NK..Ya know there has to be a little conspiracy on every big event..:)

Last Edited by <<LOOK`n thru YOU>> on 05/21/2010 07:07 AM
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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05/21/2010 07:12 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
The shkval means that the US carrier groups are vulnerable.

There are no countermeasures - yet.

Although if one knew what the detonator was - magnetic, impact etc - one could conceivably use special depth charges to confuse or detonate the torpedo.

Coupled with the Chines tactic of letting their subs sit on the bottom for extended periods, the shkval could be unstoppable.

So far Russia, China, Iran have them.

The size is 533mm, so they can be fired from almost any sub.

North Korea nad Israel could also have them.

NK trades with Iran.

Israel has cash and trades heavily with China.
Anonymous Coward
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05/21/2010 07:29 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
What does NK get by torpedoing SK war ship?

Accident of some kind.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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05/21/2010 07:34 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
What does NK get by torpedoing SK war ship?

Accident of some kind.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 541428


Or someone is furnishing the South and America with a war.

Or someone is practicing for a larger, more volatile target.
Anonymous Coward
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05/21/2010 07:36 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
Israel has cash and trades heavily with China.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 977020




Israel has *American* cash stolen from our taxpayers. Just another parasite.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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05/21/2010 07:39 AM
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Re: South Korean Warship Sunk By Shkval Rocket Torpedo *PICS*
Israel has cash and trades heavily with China.




Israel has *American* cash stolen from our taxpayers. Just another parasite.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 977039


Israel does 4 billion a year in trade with China (in 2007):

[link to www.israeltrade.org.cn]

Israel and China - Exports and Imports
By November 2007 the Bilateral Trade between China and Israel reached US$4.1 Billion, an increase of 34%. Exports reached US$923.6 million and Imports - US$3.17 billion.

China 's export to Israel has grown rapidly in the past few years. The composition of the Chinese export to Israel has also changed. The export now is composed of more high end products including hi-tech products.

Israeli export to China reflects its relevant advantages: Agro-technology such as drip irrigation, seeds, green houses, has been one of the first fields, where Israeli companies have managed to use their unique technologies and know-how. In other fields such as telecommunication, software and medical equipment, Israeli companies have managed to penetrate and even dominate some niches. The Israeli companies usually offer advanced though simple products and technologies which are much more suitable for the Chinese market.

Major Exports

Israel – China, Jan. - Nov. 2007

Category
Percent out of Total Exports

Telecommunications and high-tech equipment, machinery and electrical Equipment
41.8%

Chemical industry and

Chemical related products
20.4%

Medical and Optical Equipment
18.6%

Base metals & articles thereof

9.9%


Food, Beverages and Tobacco
3.83%


Plastics, Rubber and Articles thereof
2.01%



(Source: Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, Nov. 2007)


Major Imports from China

Israel – China, Jan. - Nov. 2007



Category
Percent out of Total Imports



Telecommunications and high-tech equipment, machinery and electrical Equipment
25.8%

Textiles and Textile Articles


17.1%

Chemical industry and

Chemical related products
12.4%

Miscellaneous manufactured articles
6.61%

Base metals & articles thereof

12.7%

Plastics, Rubber and Articles thereof

4.24%



(Source: Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, Nov. 2007)





GLP