Godlike Productions - Conspiracy Forum
Users Online Now: 903 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 164,229
Pageviews Today: 273,119Threads Today: 110Posts Today: 2,157
06:45 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

To all of you tards who think there's no debtor prisons in America

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1437022
Canada
06/21/2011 05:29 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
To all of you tards who think there's no debtor prisons in America
[link to www.startribune.com]

In jail for being in debt

You committed no crime, but an officer is knocking on your door. More Minnesotans are surprised to find themselves being locked up over debts.

It's not a crime to owe money, and debtors' prisons were abolished in the United States in the 19th century. But people are routinely being thrown in jail for failing to pay debts.

In Minnesota, which has some of the most creditor-friendly laws in the country, the use of arrest warrants against debtors has jumped 60 percent over the past four years, with 845 cases in 2009, a Star Tribune analysis of state court data has found.

Not every warrant results in an arrest, but in Minnesota many debtors spend up to 48 hours in cells with criminals. Consumer attorneys say such arrests are increasing in many states, including Arkansas, Arizona and Washington, driven by a bad economy, high consumer debt and a growing industry that buys bad debts and employs every means available to collect.

Whether a debtor is locked up depends largely on where the person lives, because enforcement is inconsistent from state to state, and even county to county.

In Illinois and southwest Indiana, some judges jail debtors for missing court-ordered debt payments. In extreme cases, people stay in jail until they raise a minimum payment. In January, a judge sentenced a Kenney, Ill., man "to indefinite incarceration" until he came up with $300 toward a lumber yard debt.

"The law enforcement system has unwittingly become a tool of the debt collectors," said Michael Kinkley, an attorney in Spokane, Wash., who has represented arrested debtors. "The debt collectors are abusing the system and intimidating people, and law enforcement is going along with it."

How often are debtors arrested across the country? No one can say. No national statistics are kept, and the practice is largely unnoticed outside legal circles. "My suspicion is the debt collection industry does not want the world to know these arrests are happening, because the practice would be widely condemned," said Robert Hobbs, deputy director of the National Consumer Law Center in Boston.



Keep denying reality, slaves.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1437381
Canada
06/21/2011 12:41 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: To all of you tards who think there's no debtor prisons in America
bump
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1334960
United States
06/21/2011 12:43 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: To all of you tards who think there's no debtor prisons in America
bump
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1437381