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The Reality of Bugging Out.

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1477940
United States
07/26/2011 06:21 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Good idea to carry a folding bicycle in the car.
Nine's
User ID: 1438041
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07/26/2011 06:24 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Do you have horses, Dr. House? I like your article but there's so much more to consider if you're planning on using a horse.

The condition of the horse, the age, the weight he's carrying,weather, available water, the terrain, the speed of the horses, and ranking right up at the top, the skill of the rider. A sloppy rider can tire a horse faster than carrying a well balanced pack.

A conditioned horse with a decent rider can walk all day, but if you make 20 miles in an 8hr. day, you're doing good.

A horse that isn't conditioned might as well not be used. It would be hard making making any decent time the first day and the next few days you'll be nursing the horse back into action. An out of condition horse is more susceptible to injury as well as soreness.

For those who are seriously considering it, there's a good book by Captain Randolph B. Marcy called, "THE PRAIRIE TRAVELER'S COMPANION." It was called the best selling book for America's Pioneers for traveling across the west. Regardless of the locale, the book offers much information such as provisions, routes, recommended clothing, shelter, etc.

Thought provoking post, Dr. House. Thanks for making it.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1309678
United States
07/26/2011 06:27 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
One word....


bicycle.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1482379
United States
07/26/2011 06:36 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Good idea to live simply beforehand as well.
Don't have a lot of material trappings that will cause you to question if you should stay or not.

Keep your important paperwork and whatnot in a safe place all together.

A bike is a good thing to have. Become really familiar with it, have some spare tubes, keep it in good repair, have a multi tool handy.
Maybe get a rack or saddlebag rig for your bike.

Have a good flashlight. Set of spare batteries. Use sparingly.

Travel during dusk and dawn, push hard. Lay down during the heat of the day to conserve water loss. Travel at night if you are comfy with it.
Work on getting in shape. See how far you can travel.

Carry high energy easily carryable foods like nuts, dried fruits, energy bars, some water flavoring packets that have vitamin c.
Carry a small amount of vitamins with you if you can.

Have matches, lighter, etc. Learn how to make a fire and keep it going.
Keep some tender like cotton balls soaked in Vaseline or alcohol in an old film canister or pill bottle.
Invest in a flint starter.

Invest in water purification tabs or a purifier straw.
Obviously have a canteen, camelbak system or bottle.
You can purify water on the go.

Keep a small first aid kit handy with whatever meds you need. Get some strong prescription painkillers as well if you can.

Bug spray!

Small tent, waterproof tarp, sleeping bag or blanket.
Use your clothes or pack as a pillow.
Practice setting up your tent and whatnot, time yourself.
Practice breaking it down. See how small you can make the package.

Invest in a good comfy backpack, learn how to conserve space.
For example, if you take the tube out of the roll of toilet paper you can squish it down to 4 actual rolls instead of 1 with a tube. Keep in a plastic baggy and press out the air.

Wear durable hand washable clothing and footwear.
Spare socks, underwear, etc.
Footwear is most important.
Stay dry!

On staying dry and not taking a risk of chafing from sudden exertion get some good lotions, anti itch creams, powders.
Chafing can be miserable and cause infection.

A good quality knife, machete or hatchet. Get a small whetstone for sharpening.
A dull tool/weapon is dangerous.

Bandannas have multiple uses.

Think Think Think!
Travel lightly!
:)
Survival Supply Industries

User ID: 1463082
United States
07/26/2011 06:39 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Good idea to live simply beforehand as well.
Don't have a lot of material trappings that will cause you to question if you should stay or not.

Keep your important paperwork and whatnot in a safe place all together.

A bike is a good thing to have. Become really familiar with it, have some spare tubes, keep it in good repair, have a multi tool handy.
Maybe get a rack or saddlebag rig for your bike.

Have a good flashlight. Set of spare batteries. Use sparingly.

Travel during dusk and dawn, push hard. Lay down during the heat of the day to conserve water loss. Travel at night if you are comfy with it.
Work on getting in shape. See how far you can travel.

Carry high energy easily carryable foods like nuts, dried fruits, energy bars, some water flavoring packets that have vitamin c.
Carry a small amount of vitamins with you if you can.

Have matches, lighter, etc. Learn how to make a fire and keep it going.
Keep some tender like cotton balls soaked in Vaseline or alcohol in an old film canister or pill bottle.
Invest in a flint starter.

Invest in water purification tabs or a purifier straw.
Obviously have a canteen, camelbak system or bottle.
You can purify water on the go.

Keep a small first aid kit handy with whatever meds you need. Get some strong prescription painkillers as well if you can.

Bug spray!

Small tent, waterproof tarp, sleeping bag or blanket.
Use your clothes or pack as a pillow.
Practice setting up your tent and whatnot, time yourself.
Practice breaking it down. See how small you can make the package.

Invest in a good comfy backpack, learn how to conserve space.
For example, if you take the tube out of the roll of toilet paper you can squish it down to 4 actual rolls instead of 1 with a tube. Keep in a plastic baggy and press out the air.

Wear durable hand washable clothing and footwear.
Spare socks, underwear, etc.
Footwear is most important.
Stay dry!

On staying dry and not taking a risk of chafing from sudden exertion get some good lotions, anti itch creams, powders.
Chafing can be miserable and cause infection.

A good quality knife, machete or hatchet. Get a small whetstone for sharpening.
A dull tool/weapon is dangerous.

Bandannas have multiple uses.

Think Think Think!
Travel lightly!
:)

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1482379



bandana - ahhh yes....

there are 30 uses at the bottom of the page....

[link to survivalsupplyindustries.com]
"Man has evolved barely an inch from the very slime that spawned him."

"It is better to have a gun and not need it than to need a gun and not have one."


[link to survivalsupplyindustries.com]
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1298889
United States
07/26/2011 06:43 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
BUGGING OUT IS NOT AN OPTION
macgun
Cosmic Messages

User ID: 377864
United States
07/26/2011 06:45 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
YOU CAN NOT bug out dummies

elites have bioweapons

they are genetically engineering mosquitoes to deliver biological death to individual targets

good luck hiding

peaceful revolution only option
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1481486


i don't even want to think about what kind of death those things will carry in coming months.
 Quoting: bbristowe


Yes, BIO WEAPONS are already in place.
There is no place to hide.
It's already been determined if we live or die.

It's best to be prepared by having peace within, knowing you did your best and having no fear.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1363954
United States
07/26/2011 06:48 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Bugged out 24 years ago , now days just logon here a couple times a day and see if you all are still around
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1483862
United States
07/26/2011 06:48 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
i have a vw bug capable of bugging out much faster than this op woild ever dream of

i can move like a speeding bug when i need to too
ar-15 nut

User ID: 1281306
United States
07/26/2011 06:49 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
I have a lbe setup for 3 days worth of supplies it stays in my pick up .
poncho/liner
canteen/cup/water purification tabs /and drinking straw
3 stripped down mre,s
550 cord
magnesium fire starter/lighter/p38 can opener/compass
usaf survival knife
mini mag light
sewing kit /fishing kit/muskol 100%deet repellent
hard candy/jerky/ramen/instant coffie
40 rounds steel core fmj
mini binoculars
chest wound bandage. reason big and with ties use for legs ect
wool socks thin /foot powder/jungle boots
it all fits but it takes alot of practice
finally a m44 russian carbine with side bayonet why it was
$60 if some one stolen it out of my truck no big loss .
And it makes a heck of a club
I also live way out 40 miles from the nearest town so this
is more for getting stuck wile hunting or breaking down
and walking out . I would not want to be anywhere near a city
when shtf you can't get out now with the traffic jamsdamned2
good post ophf

Last Edited by the deplorable ar-15 nut on 07/26/2011 06:55 PM
A pissed off American Veteran.

A Republic. If You can Keep It.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1482379
United States
07/26/2011 06:51 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Good idea to live simply beforehand as well.
Don't have a lot of material trappings that will cause you to question if you should stay or not.

Keep your important paperwork and whatnot in a safe place all together.

A bike is a good thing to have. Become really familiar with it, have some spare tubes, keep it in good repair, have a multi tool handy.
Maybe get a rack or saddlebag rig for your bike.

Have a good flashlight. Set of spare batteries. Use sparingly.

Travel during dusk and dawn, push hard. Lay down during the heat of the day to conserve water loss. Travel at night if you are comfy with it.
Work on getting in shape. See how far you can travel.

Carry high energy easily carryable foods like nuts, dried fruits, energy bars, some water flavoring packets that have vitamin c.
Carry a small amount of vitamins with you if you can.

Have matches, lighter, etc. Learn how to make a fire and keep it going.
Keep some tender like cotton balls soaked in Vaseline or alcohol in an old film canister or pill bottle.
Invest in a flint starter.

Invest in water purification tabs or a purifier straw.
Obviously have a canteen, camelbak system or bottle.
You can purify water on the go.

Keep a small first aid kit handy with whatever meds you need. Get some strong prescription painkillers as well if you can.

Bug spray!

Small tent, waterproof tarp, sleeping bag or blanket.
Use your clothes or pack as a pillow.
Practice setting up your tent and whatnot, time yourself.
Practice breaking it down. See how small you can make the package.

Invest in a good comfy backpack, learn how to conserve space.
For example, if you take the tube out of the roll of toilet paper you can squish it down to 4 actual rolls instead of 1 with a tube. Keep in a plastic baggy and press out the air.

Wear durable hand washable clothing and footwear.
Spare socks, underwear, etc.
Footwear is most important.
Stay dry!

On staying dry and not taking a risk of chafing from sudden exertion get some good lotions, anti itch creams, powders.
Chafing can be miserable and cause infection.

A good quality knife, machete or hatchet. Get a small whetstone for sharpening.
A dull tool/weapon is dangerous.

Bandannas have multiple uses.

Think Think Think!
Travel lightly!
:)

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1482379



bandana - ahhh yes....

there are 30 uses at the bottom of the page....

[link to survivalsupplyindustries.com]
 Quoting: Survival Supply Industries


Good link with unconventional knowledge.
Trick to survival is thinking outside the box and preperation.

Was lucky to have parents who went through some disasters and tought us some things.

Route planning, alternate routes, what areas you will be travelling through.

Any fruit trees you'll pass by? Any streams, lakes or large bodies of water?

Have a destination and know what you'll do when you get there!

With bicycles I forgot to add the obvious. Tire repair kit and hand pump. Learn how to use those things.

Pocket compass. Map. Signal mirror *or something shiny*.

Avoid groups of people and people in general.

Have something to trade like pills, drugs, weed, or a couple small bottles of whiskey, pouches of tobacco.

Binoculars. Use the lenses to start a fire as well.

Sunglasses. Sucks when you are riding hard and a bug hits your eye, or dust.

Think of a fishing pole, collapsable or able to break it down. A small fishing kit, extra line, lures.
The fishing line can be used for multiple things like snares, cordage, sutures, etc.

A small sewing kit, needles, thread, buttons.
Learn to sew.

Learn how to dress small animals, game, birds, fish.
Might as well carry a small shaker of salt and pepper, garlic powder and chili powder.

Think multiple uses for everything, travel lightly.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1230442
United States
07/26/2011 06:55 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Now do that with 80+ pounds on your back....
 Quoting: Dr. House


If you are really prepared, all of the provisions you will need are already in place. This will eliminate the need to carry a heavy load when the time comes. Also, paying attention to what is going on, and being aware, can put you ahead of the game at the time escape to your predetermined location becomes necessary.
 Quoting: SafetyGuy


How can you prepare for the obvious variables that will no undoubtedly prove to be counter productive?
 Quoting: bbristowe
Do what you can NOW to get out. I'm so glad I got uot in the 90's, Good luck and use your head.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1469140


Where did you go?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1482379
United States
07/26/2011 06:56 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
A simple bar of none softening anti-bacterial soap!
Wash your clothes, hands, wounds, etc.
Keep it in a plastic baggy, decompress all air.
Shampoo if you need it
.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1375072
United States
07/26/2011 07:19 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Also pre print out your sat maps on your powerline roads,fire roads,large game trails,hiking trails.Know how to get out of town by not using the public roads.
 Quoting: FUBAR


This is very true. You need to have 3 road routes to your bug out location. You should also have several food trail mapped out in advance as you mentioned. A mountain bike or dirt bike is a great investment.
Lord.Kalin

User ID: 1295383
United States
07/26/2011 07:45 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
I've been working on finding an entrance and getting to inner-earth, year around average temp of 70's and it's a PARADISE!~

dance


:LordKayleSig4:
- "Your best investment is ammo, because it's going to weird quickly." - AC 1196210

- "Rebellion to Tyrants is Obedience to God" - Thomas Jefferson's Personal Seal
Dr. House  (OP)

User ID: 1398844
United States
07/26/2011 10:46 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Do you have horses, Dr. House? I like your article but there's so much more to consider if you're planning on using a horse.

The condition of the horse, the age, the weight he's carrying,weather, available water, the terrain, the speed of the horses, and ranking right up at the top, the skill of the rider. A sloppy rider can tire a horse faster than carrying a well balanced pack.

A conditioned horse with a decent rider can walk all day, but if you make 20 miles in an 8hr. day, you're doing good.

A horse that isn't conditioned might as well not be used. It would be hard making making any decent time the first day and the next few days you'll be nursing the horse back into action. An out of condition horse is more susceptible to injury as well as soreness.

For those who are seriously considering it, there's a good book by Captain Randolph B. Marcy called, "THE PRAIRIE TRAVELER'S COMPANION." It was called the best selling book for America's Pioneers for traveling across the west. Regardless of the locale, the book offers much information such as provisions, routes, recommended clothing, shelter, etc.

Thought provoking post, Dr. House. Thanks for making it.
 Quoting: Nine's 1438041


I no longer have horses. I based my information based on old accounts of how horses were used. I am assuming a rider per horse with a few essentials on a paved or leveled clear road for the maximum distance.
Sinkhole list:
Thread: Sinkholes Updated 28 Dec 2010
find a sinkhole, add it to this thread, please.

"Whoever hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him." (1 John 3:15, NKJV).
Dr. House  (OP)

User ID: 1398844
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07/26/2011 10:47 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
If you have no roads, and have to cross streams and rivers without bridges, you are traveling like the covered wagons did A wagon might do 15-25 miles in a day.

Now do that with 80+ pounds on your back....
 Quoting: Dr. House


I just did -

16 miles in the North Cascades

up to a high-lake on hiking-trails packing gear,

(that's me on that hike in my pic)

It was up about 2000 feet in elevation gain (or more) in about 24 hours - 3 weeks ago.


WE could not even make it all the way to the lake because

we were falling into 5' deep snow-drifts before we got there,


So we had to turn around and come back

down about 2 miles before we got to a good enough place

to camp.




 Quoting: Lord.Kalin


No fun there - well, actually you most likely did have 'fun'. I miss being able to go on week long backpacking hikes. Prior to the accident I did it several times a year.
Sinkhole list:
Thread: Sinkholes Updated 28 Dec 2010
find a sinkhole, add it to this thread, please.

"Whoever hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him." (1 John 3:15, NKJV).
Dr. House  (OP)

User ID: 1398844
United States
07/26/2011 10:48 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Now do that with 80+ pounds on your back....
 Quoting: Dr. House


If you are really prepared, all of the provisions you will need are already in place. This will eliminate the need to carry a heavy load when the time comes. Also, paying attention to what is going on, and being aware, can put you ahead of the game at the time escape to your predetermined location becomes necessary.
 Quoting: SafetyGuy


10 gallons of water is about 80 pounds.

Figure you need three days provisions to get 100 miles, plus clothing, sleeping gear, whatever. If you have kids then you are also packing most of their stuff too.
Sinkhole list:
Thread: Sinkholes Updated 28 Dec 2010
find a sinkhole, add it to this thread, please.

"Whoever hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him." (1 John 3:15, NKJV).
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1364022
United States
07/26/2011 10:53 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
But what about agoraphobics Dr. House?


afro
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 728979
United States
07/26/2011 11:04 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Practical realities: blisters. No matter how good you think your shoes/socks are, they're a real possibility.

They also can get bigger than you'd think possible and incapacitate you for a week (or kill you if they become infected).

Another real consideration: chafing between the legs. Especially possible if one's overweight.

Riding a bicycle: unless youv'e built up to it, it can be an amazing pain the the @rse--literally. After 20 miles you may be feeling like someone's flogging your bottom.

If you can't bug out in a vehicle, you'll not be bugging out, but fleeing for your life. The adrenaline may mitigate some of the pain you'd otherwise be experiencing.

You'll need to crash, and when you crash, you'll need a few days to recoup.

Let's hope this stuff never happens--it's not going to be an adventure or a happy memory.
Anonymous Coward
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United States
07/26/2011 11:12 PM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
If you're bugging out on foot, you're not going to be meeting any pre-arranged timetables of arriving anywhere on schedule.

The best word I've heard regarding this was from an old man, an inveterate walker, who plainly said: "I'll go a long way, in a long time."

The point is on keeping your skin intact. Pace yourself. Pace yourself early on each time you resume your trek. Go more slowly than you feel you're capable of. You'll naturally find a rhythym you can best maintain for an extended length of time.

This will sound crazy, but try it if you have a chance: "skipping" uses less energy than running, tho' a bit more than walking. You can find a rhythym skipping and cover an amazing amount of ground in a relatively short time. It's not as fatiguing as running.

You always need to keep a reserve of energy to tap if needed--another reason not to exhaust yourself early in each period of trek.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1483900
United States
07/27/2011 12:15 AM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
Great post.
I think about this often.I will bug in.We all have B.O.B.'s just in case.This is the last thing that i want to do.

I found a place in the mountains and pre placed tools,screws,tarps(in airtight containers,Swiss military water filtration,big old hand saws in cosmoline,things to build a nice shelter with.There is also a hidden low flow spring that i could get about 50 gallons of water from a day.Its on BLM land and i only found it by hunting deer and following a small game trail.

I do not want to travel the 40 miles on foot to get there with food,guns,ammo.I have a few mini bikes with trailers that i built.If that wont work i have a back up plan with a horse farm real close by(a little trading).
 Quoting: FUBAR


You have a battery operated boyfriend?
FUBAR

User ID: 980749
United States
07/27/2011 01:11 AM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
No but i have a fleshlight in my B.O.B.

Last Edited by FUBAR on 07/27/2011 01:11 AM
Just a man who has been humbled.
MAGA!!!!!!
Dr. House  (OP)

User ID: 1398844
United States
07/27/2011 05:45 AM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
But what about agoraphobics Dr. House?


afro
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1364022


Very few people are actually afraid of big open spaces. Many who have the title are actually suffering from a social disorder.
Sinkhole list:
Thread: Sinkholes Updated 28 Dec 2010
find a sinkhole, add it to this thread, please.

"Whoever hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him." (1 John 3:15, NKJV).
moonsinger

User ID: 1471250
United Kingdom
07/27/2011 09:20 AM
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Re: The Reality of Bugging Out.
But what about agoraphobics Dr. House?


afro
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1364022


Very few people are actually afraid of big open spaces. Many who have the title are actually suffering from a social disorder.
 Quoting: Dr. House


+1 on this

As a Past Sufferer this can be debilitating
I am so far down the food chain that I've got plankton bites on my butt

1984 WAS NOT MEANT TO BE AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL





GLP