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The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.

 
DoorBert
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12/29/2011 09:29 AM
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The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
MOSCOW On the night of Monday, Dec. 5, blogger, anti-corruption activist, and budding politician Alexey Navalny was one of 500 people arrested at a protest denouncing fraud in the previous day's parliamentary elections. Surrounded by some 6,000 people -- an unheard-of number for a protest in the center of Moscow, a dozen years into the apathetic Putin era -- Navalny had delivered an angry, guttural, less-than-diplomatic speech. "We will cut their throats!" he proclaimed, then tried to lead a march down the street to the headquarters of the Federal Security Service, the powerful successor to the KGB known by its Russian initials FSB. This had not been permitted in advance, so he was bundled up, stuffed into a police van, and shuttled around nighttime Moscow to keep his supporters from picketing his detention. The next day, he was given a 15-day sentence for disobeying police orders.

By the time Navalny came out in the early morning hours of December 21, he was received with a hero's welcome. "I went to jail in one country and came out in another," he told the cheering journalists and supporters who had braved a blizzard to catch a glimpse of him.

It was true: Russia had changed while Navalny was in jail. He had missed the huge rally on December 10 on Bolotnaya Square, when the numbers who came out in peaceful, euphoric protest -- an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 -- made the original demonstration at Chystie Prudy look like a civic sneeze. Navalny had missed Vladimir Putin's stuttering, insulting response, and the energetic, often fractious and messy planning for the next protest, which took place -- with Navalny front and center among the 100,000-plus who turned out -- on Dec. 24.

[link to www.foreignpolicy.com]
Anonymous Coward
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12/29/2011 10:35 AM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
I doubt it much. Yet I am intrigued to know why would you be interested in Putin´s removal?

You do know there are much more supporters of him than the protesters don´t you.
Anonymous Coward
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12/29/2011 10:39 AM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
Putin served his purpose. Russia must now be made ready for the return of the bolcheviks. Though they will name themselves differently.
bootyshake82930

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12/29/2011 10:43 AM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
MOSCOW On the night of Monday, Dec. 5, blogger, anti-corruption activist, and budding politician Alexey Navalny was one of 500 people arrested at a protest denouncing fraud in the previous day's parliamentary elections. Surrounded by some 6,000 people -- an unheard-of number for a protest in the center of Moscow, a dozen years into the apathetic Putin era -- Navalny had delivered an angry, guttural, less-than-diplomatic speech. "We will cut their throats!" he proclaimed, then tried to lead a march down the street to the headquarters of the Federal Security Service, the powerful successor to the KGB known by its Russian initials FSB. This had not been permitted in advance, so he was bundled up, stuffed into a police van, and shuttled around nighttime Moscow to keep his supporters from picketing his detention. The next day, he was given a 15-day sentence for disobeying police orders.

By the time Navalny came out in the early morning hours of December 21, he was received with a hero's welcome. "I went to jail in one country and came out in another," he told the cheering journalists and supporters who had braved a blizzard to catch a glimpse of him.

It was true: Russia had changed while Navalny was in jail. He had missed the huge rally on December 10 on Bolotnaya Square, when the numbers who came out in peaceful, euphoric protest -- an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 -- made the original demonstration at Chystie Prudy look like a civic sneeze. Navalny had missed Vladimir Putin's stuttering, insulting response, and the energetic, often fractious and messy planning for the next protest, which took place -- with Navalny front and center among the 100,000-plus who turned out -- on Dec. 24.

[link to www.foreignpolicy.com]
 Quoting: DoorBert


Hmmmm....a Lech Walesa redux? This situation bears watching with unjaundiced eyes.
Anonymous Coward
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12/29/2011 10:44 AM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
Alexey Navalny works for brit banksters
Anonymous Coward
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12/29/2011 02:25 PM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
Alexey Navalny is a neo-nazi.
Anonymous Coward
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12/29/2011 02:29 PM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
Alexey Navalny works for brit banksters
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 7889893


Interesting. Judging by the amount of followers he already has, he could be Russia's Hitler. He is a nazi as well. Bad times ahead for Russia if this lunatic comes to power.
Anonymous Coward
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12/29/2011 02:31 PM
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Re: The End of Putin - Alexey Navalny on why the Russian protest movement will win.
I doubt it much. Yet I am intrigued to know why would you be interested in Putin´s removal?

You do know there are much more supporters of him than the protesters don´t you.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 6196114


I wonder too. There are people who want to get a hold of Russia's oil and gas and have their share of the loot.





GLP