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Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?

 
MaxBlack
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User ID: 10889
Canada
12/10/2005 09:20 PM
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Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Didn't CocaCola commission Norman Rockwell to paint Santa in the company colours?circa 1922
TruthTeller

User ID: 26602
United States
12/10/2005 09:25 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
blink
Sophia

User ID: 23
New Zealand
12/10/2005 09:26 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
According to the Hitler Channel, yes, yes they did.
MaxBlack  (OP)

User ID: 10889
Canada
12/10/2005 09:27 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Hitler channel???? do you mean Z.N.N.?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 11476
United States
12/10/2005 09:31 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Some say that the first human sized "Santa" appeared in that Coca-Cola ad. He had been described as an elf previously. I don't think this is exactly correct, just clever marketing.
idol_harobed

User ID: 52195
Brazil
12/10/2005 09:31 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Urban legend.

[link to www.snopes.com]
I am what I read.
MaxBlack  (OP)

User ID: 10889
Canada
12/10/2005 09:36 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Before the Norman Rockwell paintings Santa Claus was in brown fur with white trim.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 52203
Italy
12/10/2005 09:41 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Coca-Cola and Christmas

In 1931, the Coca-Cola Company commissioned Chicago illustrator Haddon Sundblom to develop the image of a human-like Santa Claus, based on the positive public response to a magazine advertisement for Coca-Cola depicting such a character that appeared in late 1930. Prior to Sundblom's first rendition in 1931, people envisioned Santa Claus as leprechaun-like, or as a queer mixture of a gnome and a bishop. Over the next third of a century, Sundblom's Santa would be embraced by the public worldwide, and become a holiday tradition.

For inspiration in creating his Santa Claus, Sundblom turned to Clement Moore's 1822 poem "A Visit From St. Nicholas". Moore's description of the toy maker as "chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf" led to an image of Santa that was warm, friendly and human.

Sundblom often used neighborhood kids, dogs and family members as models, changing their hair color, clothes, even genders to suit his subject. Sundblom's original model for Santa was his friend and neighbor Lou Prentice, a retired salesman. After Prentice died in the late 1940's, Sundblom would often find his model by looking in the mirror.

The remaining Santa paintings use Sundblom as his own model -- although he said he added the beard as he painted, rather than growing one.

Haddon Sundblom painted 35 years of Santa portraits that were used in magazine ads and posters, and which now also appear in special exhibitions around the world.

"Of the thousands of pieces of art in our archives, none is as valuable as the Sundblom Santas," said Philip F. Mooney, the Company's archivist. "But their value goes beyond the worth of the paintings themselves."

Another one of Haddon Sundblom's famous creations for the Coca-Cola Company was the Sprite Boy, which was originally usefuck_tarde the brand name Coke in 1942. The Sprite Boy wore either a soda-jerk's cap to promote fountain sales of Coke or a bottle cap to advertise bottled Coca-Cola. After 1949, the Sprite Boy would not appear with Santa again, and he disappeared altogether from advertising for Coca-Cola by 1958.

Haddon Sundblom, who died in 1976, created numerous illustrations used in advertising for Coca-Cola over the years, but is best known for the Santa and Sprite Boy characters.

*My entire page, including pictures, was featured in the Nov. - Dec. 1997 Christmas Edition issue of The Cola Commentary, which is the Iowa Chapter of the Coca-Cola Collectors Club newsletter. Special thanks to Chuck Hardy, editor, for keeping up the Coca-Cola and Christmas spirit!
[link to www.icubed.com]
MaxBlack  (OP)

User ID: 10889
Canada
12/10/2005 09:44 PM
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Re: Is Santa Claus Mr.CocaCola?
Gee thanx for clearing that up for me.Many thanks





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