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<<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>

 
asgardhr
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12/17/2005 01:01 PM
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<<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>
Saturnalia was the feast at which the the Romans commemorated the dedication of the temple of the god Saturn, which took place on 17 December. Over the years, it expanded to a whole week, up to 23 December. In the vagaring Roman calendar the Winter Solstice fell in this period; in imperial times that event was celebrated in honour of Sol Invictus and put on 25 December by emperor Aurelian in 274, so after the Saturnalia.

The Saturnalia originally were celebrated with a public banquet. It became one of the most popular Roman festivals which lead to more tomfoolery, marked chiefly by having masters and slaves switch places, and degenerated sometimes to debauchery, so that among Christians the (lower case) word "saturnalia" came to mean "orgy".

The customary greeting for the occasion is a "Io, Saturnalia!" io (pronounced "yo") being a Latin interjection related to "ho" (as in "Ho, praise to Saturn").

It has been postulated that Christians in the fourth century assigned December 25th (the Winter Solstice on the Julian calendar) as Christ's birthday (and thus Christmas) because pagans already observed this day as a holiday. This would sidestep the problem of eliminating an already popular holiday while Christianizing the population. This is supposition however and it is also possible that the early Christians sought to replace the Pagan celebration in an act of triumphalism.

The Romans also practiced many traditions similar to Christmas; specifically the "christmas tree". The Romans often cut down evergreens and decorated them to pay homage to Saturn, the god of farming. This was to honor the fact that the evergreens remained alive during the harshness of winter. It was also traditional for Romans to exchange gifts during this holiday. These gifts were customarily made of silver, although nearly anything could be given as a gift for the occasion. Several epigrams by the poet Martial survive, seemingly crafted as riddling gift-tags for gifts of food. The medieval celebration of the Feast of Fools was another continuation of Saturnalia into the Christian era.

Seneca the Younger wrote about Rome during Saturnalia around CE 50:

It is now the month of December, when the greatest part of the city is in a bustle. Loose reins are given to public dissipation; everywhere you may hear the sound of great preparations, as if there were some real difference between the days devoted to Saturn and those for transacting business....Were you here, I would willingly confer with you as to the plan of our conduct; whether we should eve in our usual way, or, to avoid singularity, both take a better supper and throw off the toga.

Or, in the original:

December est mensis: cum maxime civitas sudat. Ius luxuriae publice datum est; ingenti apparatu sonant omnia, tamquam quicquam inter Saturnalia intersit et dies rerum agendarum; adeo nihil interest ut non videatur mihi errasse qui dixit olim mensem Decembrem fuisse, nunc annum. [...]

From Epistulae morales ad Lucilium, XVIII

Macrobius in the 5th century wrote a book of fiction called Saturnalia, about the great Roman intellectuals meeting, celebrating, and discussing, and set at the time of the Saturnalia; we learn a lot about the traditions of that day.

[link to en.wikipedia.org]
Freyja

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12/17/2005 01:07 PM
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Re: <<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>
And from the Lakota tradition of celebrating lights return:


Great Spirits of the Winter and of the North Direction. Hear us as we come asking for wisdom and the courage to age gracefully in our lives and in our endeavors. Honour us with your presence as we gather in your Sacred Section of our season and our Earthwalk. Permit the crystal clarity of winter snow to bring purity to our lives and thoughts, and healing to our bodies and to our world. Spirit of The White Buffalo, help us to turn the lessons we have learned and the knowledge we have gained into wisdom and abundance, spiritually and physically. Allow us to understatnd the DIGNITY OF BEING. Help us to learn truth and beauty of NOT DOING. Spirit of the Great White Owl, teach us to fly with quite grace and seeing eyes through the dark times of our lives. Give us the patience to share ourselves and our knowledge with those who can use them. Give us the faith and the courage to continue our journey's end, in dignity, so that our energy may once again arrive in the Dawn of the EAst. SHOW US HOW TO FIND JOY IN DARKNESS AND IN ENDINGS, AS WELL AS LIGHT AND IN BEGINNINGS. HO.
asgardhr  (OP)

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12/17/2005 01:20 PM
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Re: <<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>
I'll drink to that Freyja!

cheers
Freyja

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12/17/2005 01:23 PM
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I am using that as the opening of my solstice cermony Wednesday evening.

Please join us in spirit!

abduct
Sol Invictus

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12/17/2005 01:32 PM
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>>in imperial times that event was celebrated in honour of Sol Invictus<<

Good times, good times :P

I'm not a big fan of the Roman Empire and its legacy, but even they had more sense than the Xtians which followed...

Io, Saturnalia!

cheers
Aut viam inveniam aut faciam
James.
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12/17/2005 02:58 PM
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A couple of Questions since you brought it Up OP.

take a walk with me in understanding I'll do my best not to losse you.

?.#1: To the best of your understanding What does "BC & AD" as used in referance to the Gragorian Calender.

?.#2: Why do most ppl blame Xtians for the Wrongs Commited by the Churches.

For TRUE Christian people DoNOT make War we Offer Peace and will only Defend OurSelves as Required.

To Our Indian Freinds:

We offer Our Eternal Peace in RightStanding, you Have Your Culture that is of Your Ancestors, You all Tried your Best to stay WithIn that which had Been Set Before you, We Appoligise for the UnDesired outcome to this Point(Juncture in Time).

Your planed opening sounds good and Well Intenshioned.

It was not in Our Intent nor Plans that Your Peoples that you are(Colectivly, All Tribes around the World) should have to Suffer at the Hands of the White Man who acted WrongFully in the Name of Our Beloved Savior Jesus.(I Personaly am Appoligiseing for the Glitch). However you Must Understand that in the Game of Free Will We only Interact at critical junctures. We allow people their own doings and collectivly the Worlds Ppl have Allowed it, Not much we can do in that Reguard.

It is Not Our Way to Force others to belive, For you of Your Kind we only Sought ecknolgment(sp?) And You have Continued to Honer Us in you Peace Offerings of the Piece Pipe.

the information you have Requested will be Addressed after the Determation of the OutCome has been arived at.

There is a work in progress to atempt to ReStore the Plan. (The Jurry is Still Out on this One, The variables are Many with One Critial Issue to be Addressed.) Know that We Are Trying.

Untill next time.

James.
bike
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12/17/2005 03:00 PM
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Re: <<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>
or EL...the Iswaeli G-d of war...ugghhh!
asgardhr  (OP)

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12/17/2005 08:49 PM
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Re: <<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>
>>> I am using that as the opening of my solstice cermony Wednesday evening.

Please join us in spirit! <<<


You got it!







To Sol, another cheers.






James-You sound like a decent person. But this Xtianity that you refer to...

"For TRUE Christian people DoNOT..."
"We offer Our Eternal Peace..."
"It was not in Our Intent..."
"It is Not Our Way..."

...and so on. What Xtianity is that, or which Xtianity? Obviously not the whole of Xtianity.

Which Xtianity is it that has set populations bombs off across the planet? That has annhilated pagans(infidels/sinners)? That has denegrated woman? That obstructs birth control and abortion? And homosexuality? And mind drugs? Yet supports industry and waste and pollution and poisoned foods? That - in its heart - despises nature and the natural world - eden?

There is the jihad of Xtianity which has risen up since the Eighties and now permeates the government. It is also the driving force behind 'Wise Use' (which is a euphemism for pillaging the planet).

I could go on and on.

Each of the hundreds of sects of the Xtian cult believes it to be the Core of Xtianity.

Xtianity, just like the gods of Rome, is a human invention. An abstraction. It has no fecund reality outside of civilization. It is perhaps a Dream. But unfortunately, it has all too often been a bad dream.

However I do bless you in your dream - godspeed.
asgardhr  (OP)

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12/18/2005 10:20 PM
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Re: <<< Yo....SATURNALIA! >>>
By the beginning of December, writes Columella, the farmer should have finished his autumn planting. Now, at the time of the winter solstice (December 25 in the Julian calendar), Saturnus, the god of seed and sowing, was honored with a festival. The Saturnalia officially was celebrated on December 17 (a.d. XVI Kal. Ian.) and, in Cicero's time, lasted seven days, from December 17-23. Augustus attempted to limit the holiday to three days, so the civil courts would not have to be closed any longer than necessary, and Caligula extended it to five. Still, everyone seems to have continued to celebrate for a full week, extended, says Macrobius (I.10.24), by the exchange of sigillaria, small earthenware figurines that were sold then.

Macrobius, in his Saturnalia, creates an imaginary symposium among pagan intellectuals that takes place then. There, he offers an explanation for the varying length of the holiday. Originally, it was celebrated on only one day, the fourteenth before the Kalends of January (December 19). With the Julian reform of the calendar, however, two days were added to December, and the Saturnalia was celebrated sixteen days before the Kalends (December 17), "with the result that, since the exact day was not commonly known--some observing the addition which Caesar had made to the calendar and others following the old usage--the festival came to be regarded as lasting for more days than one" (I.10.2). The original day was given over to the Opalia, honoring Ops, who personified abundance and the fruits of the earth, and was the consort of Saturn. As the two deities represented the produce of the fields and orchards, so they also were thought to represent heaven and earth. It was for this reason, says Macrobius (I.10.20), that the festivals were celebrated at the same time, the worshippers of Ops always sitting in prayer so that they touched the earth, mother of all.

In the Roman calendar, the Saturnalia was designated a holy day, or holiday, on which religious rites were performed. Saturn, himself, was identified with Kronos, and sacrificed to according to Greek ritual, with the head uncovered. The Temple of Saturn, the oldest temple recorded by the pontiffs, had been dedicated on the Saturnalia, and the woolen bonds which fettered the feet of the ivory cult statue within were loosened on that day to symbolize the liberation of the god.

It also was a festival day. After sacrifice at the temple, there was a public banquet, which Livy says was introduced in 217 BC (there also may have been a lectisternium, a banquet for the god in which its image is placed in attendance, as if a guest). Afterwards, according to Macrobius (I.10.18), the celebrants shouted "Io, Saturnalia!" at a riotous feast in the temple.

The Saturnalia was the most popular holiday of the Roman year. Catullus describes it as "the best of days," and Seneca complains that the "whole mob has let itself go in pleasures." Pliny the Younger writes that he retired to his room while the rest of the household celebrated. Cicero fled to the countryside. It was an occasion for celebration, visits to friends, and the presentation of gifts, particularly wax candles (cerei), perhaps to signify the returning light after the solstice, and sigillaria. Martial wrote Xenia and Apophoreta for the Saturnalia. Both were published in December and intended to accompany the "guest gifts" which were given at that time of year. Aulus Gellius relates in his Attic Nights (XVIII.2) that he and his Roman compatriots would gather at the baths in Athens, where they were studying, and pose difficult questions to one another on the ancient poets, a crown of laurel being dedicated to Saturn if no-one could answer them.

During the holiday, restrictions were relaxed and the social order inverted. Gambling was allowed in public. Slaves were permitted to use dice and did not have to work. Instead of the toga, less formal dinner clothes (synthesis) were permitted, as was the pilleus, a felt cap normally worn by the manumitted slave that symbolized the freedom of the season. Within the family, a Lord of Misrule was chosen. Slaves were treated as equals, allowed to wear their masters' clothing, and be waited on at meal time in remembrance of an earlier golden age thought to have been ushered in by the god.

This equality was temporary, of course; and Petronius speaks of an impudent slave being asked at some other time of the year whether it was December yet. Dio writes of Aulus Plautius, who was to lead the conquest of Britain, cajoling his troops. But they hesitated, "indignant at the thought of carrying on a campaign outside the limits of the known world." Only when they were entreated by a former slave dispatched by Claudius did they relent, shouting "Io, Saturnalia." (If a time of merriment, the season also was an occasion for murder. Commodus was strangled in his bath on New Year's eve, and Caracalla plotted to murder his brother during the Saturnalia.)

At the end of the first century AD, Statius still could proclaim: "For how many years shall this festival abide! Never shall age destroy so holy a day! While the hills of Latium remain and father Tiber, while thy Rome stands and the Capitol thou hast restored to the world, it shall continue." And the Saturnalia did continue to be celebrated as Brumalia (from bruma, winter solstice) down to the Christian era, when, by the middle of the fourth century AD, its rituals had become absorbed in the celebration of Christmas.





GLP