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Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California

 
Anonymous Coward
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05/07/2006 11:36 PM
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Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
Blood-feast in Berkeley
[link to www.americanthinker.com]

On March 18th, a shocking crime took place in Berkeley, California, at a spot famous for sweeping Bay views, distinguished architecture, and the genteel atmosphere that wealthy “progressives” create for themselves. An elderly woman, walking home with her husband from an extension class at the University of California, was grabbed by a young woman who was walking toward her on the sidewalk. In a flash, her throat was slit to the bone.

As she spurted blood, the suspect drove off with her companion, another young woman, in a light blue BMW M3 convertible, a car which carries a suggested retail price of 55 thousand dollars.

Astoundingly, the victim survived the attack, thanks to the many witnesses who called for police and medical assistance, and after six hours in surgery and an extended stay in intensive care, has been released from the hospital. The 75 year old also survived being struck by lightning in her youth.

From the beginning, police and prosecutors were very cagey in revealing information about the case. The victim’s name was not published in the press, for reasons of “security.” Two days after the crime, a suspect was apprehended, a sixteen year old juvenile, whose name was withheld, as is the usual case with juveniles. She was jailed and then ordered to undergo psychological examination. Subsequent press reports indicated that the suspect had a history of both mental illness and violent attacks. She had escaped from a care facility.

But the most curious aspect of the case is the identity, behavior, and subsequent official treatment of the companion. Eleven days after the incident, the press revealed that she was a county mental health worker assigned to Juvenile Hall. Still declining to reveal her name, authorities placed the juvenile mental health worker on paid administrative leave, despite the fact that she had witnessed, if not participated in a horrific crime, had not reported it to the police, and had accompanied the perpetrator in her escape.

Yesterday, April 6th, the press learned the name of the alleged companion, as police issued a warrant for her arrest. The Oakland Tribune reported

Berkeley police attempted to arrest Hamaseh Kianfar, 30, at her Marin County home Tuesday, but she was not there. Sources said negotiations were under way between authorities and Kianfar’s attorney for her surrender.

A no-bail warrant has been issued for Kianfar’s arrest.

Kianfar was reported to be the owner of the BMW convertible used to get away from the scene of the crime.

Disturbingly, it was revealed that Kianfar had been questioned by police twice regarding the incident, and had changed her story.

Sources said Kianfar originally told police she just happened to be driving by when she spotted the teenager.

Her second story to police was that she was visiting friends in North Oakland and afterward spotted Webster looking distraught on Telegraph Avenue. Knowing the girl’s history, Kianfar said she decided to give the teenager a ride, and they ended up in the Berkeley hills, where the attack occurred.

Despite prima facie evidence of lying to the police, in addition to witnessing and failing to report a very serious crime, and apparently facilitating the escape of the assailant, she was not arrested at the time.

Authorities believe Kianfar drove with the juvenile suspect to the scene of the crime, and the juvenile got out of the passenger seat. After the attack, witnesses said, the slasher and her companion walked quickly to a light-blue BMW M3 convertible, got in and drove away.

Berkeley police initially called the mystery woman who was with the slasher an “accomplice.” After they arrested the 16-year-old suspect, however, police said they had identified the companion and had not arrested her.

Why the kid glove treatment of a woman entrusted with the responsibility of care for mentally disturbed juveniles? Especially, given the fact that, according to Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson

...it was county policy for social workers stationed at Juvenile Hall not to spend time with clients off the premises, other than in special sanctioned cases…

After the arrest warrant was issued, Kianfar’s attorney reportedly negotiated conditions of her surrender, and she surrendered to Oakland police yesterday, April 6th,

But the special treatment of Kianfar continues. Despite the no-bail condition of the warrant issued for her arrest, Kanfar was released on $15,000 bail (just over a quarter of the list price of her high performance sports car), the “standard” amount for someone charged with being accessory-after-the-fact in an attempted homicide, the only charge currently lodged.

But, shockingly and inexplicably:

For unknown reasons, Kianfar was not booked, fingerprinted or photographed by Oakland police Wednesday, authorities said. She was also given a May 6 court date; Felony suspects are generally required to appear in court within 48 hours.

So who on earth is this woman, Hamaseh Kianfar?

Unless there are two women of the same name living in Marin County, California, she appears to be quite an interesting and indeed prominent character. Amazon.com lists her as the author of the book Sufi Stories, the holder of master’s degree and candidate for a Ph.D.

Further research indicates that she is the daughter of the co-founders of the International Association of Sufism ®, headquartered in Marin County, and an attendee at UN-sponsored conference on

Global Solidarity: The Way to Peace and International Cooperation. This Conference brought together United Nations NGO from around the world in an effort to build bridges among us to explore viable ways for civil society to generate action plans focused on development, peace, human rights and environmental issues.

The International Association of Sufism ® is one among many organizations related in various ways to the Sufi religious practice in the United States.

Sufism itself is a venerable and highly respectable religious practice, based on mysticism, originally growing from Islamic roots, but developing in complex ways, not all of them part of Islam. Many famous Islamic writers, philosophers, and poets have been Sufis.

Wikipedia notes:

Since they believe that everything is a reflection of God, the school of Sufism practices to see the beauty inside the apparently ugly, and to open arms to what they believe as even the most evil one. [emphasis added] This religious tolerance is expressed in Sufism by the famous Sufi philosopher and poet Mevlana Rumi : “Come, come, whoever you are. Worshiper, Wanderer, Lover of Leaving; ours is not a caravan of despair. Though you have broken your vows a thousand times…Come, come again, Come.” (In many Unitarian Universalist youth groups this poem is sung with minor alterations)

Because of its mysticism, and because it espouses peace and tolerance and believes in accepting everyone, Sufism, in America in particular, has been embraced by many in the “new age” religious movement in the United States. Marin-County-based IAS appears to be itself quite open to this version of ecumenism, featuring speakers expert in in “trans-personal psychology” and other new-agey fields at its symposia.

The Oakland Tribune reports

a law enforcement source said an Alameda County grand jury could launch its own investigation into Kianfar’s relationship with the teenage suspect and possibly other wards at juvenile hall.

This last hint that Kianfar may have had other improper relationships with mentally-troubled juveniles is particularly chilling given one other morsel appearing in he press: the suspect’s apparent stated reason for committing the crime. According to the Oakland Tribune,

[the suspect] called the throat slashing a “feasting” ritual. Sources said feasting is the consumption of human blood.

Aside from the spunky Oakland Trib, Bay Area news media have been extremely reticent about revealing any details related to the role of Kianfar in the hideous crime. One would think that the combination of the brutality of the attack, a wealthy and prominent accomplice, the curious manner of police, prosecutorial and judicial handling of the accomplice, and the lurid detail of blood-feasting would lead to an avalanche of coverage.

But Bay Area media do have their sensitivities. San Francisco Chronicle star columnist Joan Ryan probably spoke for many local editors and reporters when she broke out her handkerchief and wrote a sob sister column on the poor, oppressed perp:

she stood on tip-toes, peering through the door of the holding room to see if her grandmother and sister had arrived yet, as if she were backstage at a school play….

seemed oddly energized, almost perky, turning in her seat at the defendant’s table to smile at her family….

we may have glimpsed the kind of amorality that some call evil, and everything in us says smooth-faced 16-year-old girls smiling at their grandmas cannot be evil….

the dearth of mental-health services in the county….

And through voices of sources she quotes:

“The mental health system for juveniles in this state is really broken,’’ said Nancy Yalon, assistant chief of juvenile probation for San Francisco….

“We see kid after kid after kid with no parental upbringing. Abandoned, neglected kids with no value system at all’‘….

“In a month,’’ she said, “nobody is even going to be talking about this.’‘

If the dominant Bay Area media get their way, the public may never know just what the heck is going on here.

The national media has not yet caught on to what is up in the Alameda County justice system. Aside from the Oakland Tribune, the smallest and least influential of the four Bay Area dailies, nobody in the Bay Area media world is going to take up the case.

Where are the National Enquirer and Geraldo Rivera when you need them?
Anonymous Coward
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05/07/2006 11:38 PM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
Bump.
Anonymous Coward
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05/07/2006 11:43 PM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
Nothing specific, just related information:

[link to www.theestimate.com]


Muslim Groups

For northern Iraq, most mainstream Muslims (leaving out some of the small syncretist groups) are Sunnis, though there are some Shi‘ites, either Kurds (particularly along the Iranian border), or Arabs resettled from southern Iraq as part of the Arabization program. As noted, Sunni Arabs and Sunni Kurds belong to difference legal schools of Sunnism.

But among the Kurds in particular, the fact that one is a Sunni of the Shaf‘i legal school is usually of importance only to religious scholars. Far more important are the traditional identification of tribal groups with one of the major Sufi mystical orders. Sufism is not a sect — there are Sunni Sufis and Shi‘ite Sufis — but an approach to religious practice and devotion, often associated with membership in a particular “order” (tariqa) following certain specific ceremonial practices and faithful to the teachings and rituals of a (sometimes hereditary) chain of sheikhs. In a few areas of the Islamic world, Sufism and specific Sufi orders have had profound impact; among these areas are Central Asia and the Caucasus, plus Kurdistan. Often, in all these areas, the sheikh of a Sufi order was also the military leader of tribes which might resist the power of the central government. We are not speaking of remote medieval events here: the Barzanis who have led the Kurdistan Democratic Party in the past century are hereditary sheikhs of the Naqshbandi order.

There are Sufi orders among the Shi‘ite Kurds as well as the Sunnis, and the Nurbakhshi order is one of the most influential there. But among Sunni Kurds, the two major orders are the Qadiri and the Naqshbandi. The Qadiri take their name from their founder, the 12th century sheikh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Gailani (Gilani, Khaylani). The other order, the Naqshbandi, was founded at Bukhara in Central Asia in the 14th Century by Baha’ al-Din Naqshband, and introduced into Kurdistan more recently, really taking hold only in the early 19th century under the influence of a particularly charismatic leader.

The two orders tend to divide geographically: to the northern and western parts of Iraqi Kurdistan one finds mostly Naqshbandis; to the east and south, Qadiris. These divisions also follow tribal lines. As already noted, the Barzani family, leaders of the KDP, are hereditary Sufi masters as well as political leaders. The Talabani tribe of Jalal Talabani, head of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), are Qadiris, though the Talabani leadership of the PUK, unlike the Barzanis in the KDP, is not itself from a line of Sufi sheikhs.

It needs to be emphasized that the real distinctions here are not doctrinal, but involve religious practices and a sense of belonging to a larger organization; the practices may include dancing and chanting, meditation, and the like, with some rituals characteristic of the particular order. The fundamental structure of a Sufi order, in which the murid or follower is loyal to a sheikh or master, fits neatly into a basically tribal society, and has often been the reason that Sufi masters could become powerful rebel chieftains, since they have a following of loyalists already in place. If those loyalists also happen to belong to the same tribe, the bonds of loyalty are reinforced. Thus the Barzanis — Ahmad, Mustafa, and now Mas‘ud have been both religious and political/military leaders of their region.

Thus, too, the longstanding split between the KDP and the PUK has multiple levels of identity: it is a split between rival political organizations, and between the personalities of Mas‘ud Barzani and Jalal Talabani; but it also reflects the division between Naqshbandi and Qadiri, tribal divisions, and even dialect areas of Kurdish.

The Christians
Most estimates today put the total Christian population of Iraq at about 3% of the country’s 26 million people. It was once considerably larger; persecution, the Assyrian massacres of 1933, and hopes for a better life have led many Iraqi Christians to emigrate. Though a small community, the Christians have often been influential, and as most people probably know, the one powerful Christian in the Saddam Hussein regime was Deputy Prime Minister Tariq ‘Aziz, a Chaldean Catholic. Some have suggested that ‘Aziz’ long survival was in part due to the fact that, since a Christian will never be the leader of a 97% Muslim country, he posed no threat to Saddam.

Christianity spread early to northern Mesopotamia. The Kingdom of Adiabene, which had in fact had Jewish rulers at the time of Christ, became Christianized early; the faith also spread into the mountains to the north, and Armenians are always noting that they were the first kingdom to make Chrsitianity official, some years before Constantine in the Roman Empire. In the debates over the nature of Christ which split the early Christian councils and created lasting divisions, the churches of what is now Iraq belonged to the so-called “Nestorian” tendency, denounced as heretical by both the “Orthodox” and “Monophysite” sides of the controversy. (All three groups considered themselves orthodox of course; “Nestorian” and “Monophysite” were terms used by their rivals, and today most believers of each group believe the original dispute was one of misunderstanding and semantics, not of fundamental faith.) The so-called Nestorian Church also was divided from the other Christian churches loyal to Rome or Constantinople by being behind the boundary of the Parthian Empire; it therefore developed separately, and in fact carried out extensive missionary activities throughout Asia, including India and China.

The heir of historic Nestorianism is the church which today calls itself the Assyrian Church of the East. It is headed by a Patriarch. As noted in the last issue, some of the members of the Assyrian Church still speak Aramaic as their first language; this is particularly true of those who migrated out of what is now eastern Turkey during the First World War. The majority, however, speak Arabic or in some cases Kurdish.

Beginning in the 15th century, some members of the Church of the East came under the influence of Roman Catholic missionaries. Over time, as disputes over the patriarchate arose, more bishops of the Church of the East recognized Rome, and an “Eastern Rite” of the Catholic Church was formed, the Chaldean Catholic Church. Like other Eastern Rites, it maintains its distinct liturgy and customs but recognizes the Pope as the head of the Church. The Chaldeans came by the 19th century to outnumber the independent “Nestorian” Church of the East, and today Chaldeans are the largest Christian denomination in Iraq. Its patriarch bears the title Patriarch of Babylon. In recent years there has been much dialogue between the Assyrian and Chaldean churches, both facing pressure from the overwhelming Muslim majority.

There are other Christian groups present as well, though the Assyrians and Chaldeans are the overwhelming majority of Iraqi Christians. The Syrian Orthodox Church, the Armenian Church, and other Middle Eastern Christian denominations are also represented. These are most often identified with specific ethnic communities, or, in the cases of some of the Syrian Orthdox, near the borders.

Under Saddam Hussein, the Christians generally did not fare any worse than other Iraqis generally; there was no religious pressure on them from the government, and many saw the regime as a protector and patron.

Jews
Baghdad may have been 20% Jewish at one time, but at the time of Israel’s creation there were major efforts to bring Iraqi Jews to Israel. Still, Judaism has ancient roots in Mesopotamia, where the Bible says Abraham was born, and where the Babylonian captivity took place; there were Jewish kingdoms in northern Mesopotamia in the first century AD, and a flourishing community in Baghdad as well as smaller communities elsewhere.

The number of Jews still living in Iraq is unclear. During the war, one Iraqi Jew arrived in Israel and was quoted in the Israeli media as saying that there were only 35 Jews still living in Iraq, but this number seems to have referred to the regions under Saddam’s control. There has long been a significant Kurdish-speaking Jewish community in the north, and while most of those, too, have migrated to Israel (one can find Kurdish restaurants in both Tel Aviv and Jerusalem), it is believed that some remain behind in the Kurdish autonomous zone.

The Other Sects
Like many mountain regions, northern Iraq has been a haven for small, heterodox belief communities which might have been exterminated long ago in an urban environment. The Yazidis and some other small groups in northern Iraq (and the Mandaeans in southern Iraq) are examples of these. Their numbers are not great (a few hundred thousand at most) and are hard to determine because most of these small, syncretistic faiths have at least some external elements resembling Islam, members may also belong to Sufi orders, and may list themselves as Muslim on official documents. (Similarly, the Mandaeans in the south, who are not discussed in this survey of the north, call themselves the “Christians of Saint John the Baptist”, though they are not considered Christian by Christian communities.)

In the north, one finds the Kurdish-speaking Yazidis; farther to the south and east but still in northern Iraq there are pockets of a heterodox movement called the Ahl-e Haqq (People of the Truth), though they are increasingly seen as merely extremist Shi‘ites; in Iraq can also be found elements of the ‘Ali-Ilahis (literally, those who deify ‘Ali). All these groups are syncretistic and have incorporated some elements of Zoroastrianism, bits of ancient nature religions, and (especially in the latter two cases), elements of Shi‘ite Islam. The influence has run both ways, and the Isma‘ili sect of Islam, in particular, has drawn upon many of the same roots. The Druze, in Lebanon and Syria, likewise incorporate some of these features.

Despite some superficial Islamic features such as the veneration of ‘Ali, however, these faiths generally are quite outside the Muslim tradition. There is a strong emphasis on such elements as reincarnation and the transmigration of souls. There is often a belief in a series of avatars who have come among men, and sometimes these include Muslim figures such as ‘Ali. There is a strong emphasis on angelic beings, and Yazidism takes its original name from an old Persian word for angel, though its resemblance to the Arabic name Yazid, name of the Caliph who martyred Imam Hussein, has meant that the name has sometimes become a pejorative among Muslims.

The actual belief systems of these faiths seems to have changed greatly through the centuries, accommodating itself to a more Islamic environment. A central figure of Yazidi belief is Malak Ta’us, the “Angel Peacock”, a bird image; misunderstanding of certain aspects of this veneration have led to charges among Christian and Muslim neighbors that the Yazidis worship the devil.

These are tiny groups for the most part (the Yazidis are the largest of these groups in Iraq, but their numbers are hard to judge, perhaps as many as 100,000). Because their doctrines are secretive and their syncretist nature means that there are extensive borrowings of superficially Islamic elements such as veneration of ‘Ali, and because elements of some of these ideas have crept into Isma‘ilism, some Sufi orders, and other Muslim traditions, it can be very hard to define exactly what an individual or group believes.
U R B-ing profiled
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05/07/2006 11:46 PM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
[link to www.sluty_whore.net]
Anonymous Coward
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05/08/2006 01:21 AM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
A great article!
Son of a Dhimmi
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05/08/2006 02:13 AM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
Sufism was used to seduce, and then convert, the Buddhist/Animist people of Indonesia. When the Arabs arrived, they began preaching not strict Islam, but mystical Sufism. This was done deliberately because it was believed that the mystical/philosophical lure of Sufism would appeal to the native culture.

After converting a critical mass of the Indonesian populace, using Sufism a a lure, the Arabs quickly revealed that Sufi teachings have no basis in Islam per se, and actually constitute heresy! Strict Islam was promoted and imposed, first from outside, then from within.

Today, Indonesia is the most populous Muslim country on Earth. Although today radical Muslims often raid infidel villages, sometimes decapitating and spiting upon pikes the heads of Christians and other minorities, Muslims are quick to point out that Indonesia was converted to Islam without force.
Anonymous Coward
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05/08/2006 03:12 AM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
Liberal tards live in Berkley. It does not surprise me that you got a crack head commiting murder.
salimandr

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06/20/2006 06:29 PM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
and jim jones used to pastor an assembly of god church.

point being?

people of all walks in life...are capable of wrong doing.
"you have not converted a man because you have silenced him."-john morlay
Muse
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06/20/2006 06:36 PM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
<point being?

A strange and disturbing event, with some seemingly legitimate questions raised by OP's (not me, btw) interesting article..

(Admittedly perhaps--more interesting to me, in that it happened just "over the hill" from where I live)..
Muse
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06/20/2006 06:50 PM
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Re: Strange Sufi Blood Feast Attempted Muder Attack in Berekely, California
<In that same neck of the woods, right?

A little before my time, DrPostman..but yes, I do believe you are correct that he had his roots in the Bay Area..

Actually iirc, he had some sort of commune/compound up North (like on the North Coast), maybe in addition to a congregation in this immediate area..