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NULLIFY the NSA: Utah Activists Seek to Prohibit Utilities Service to Data Center via State Laws

 
Ag47
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12/03/2013 08:30 PM
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NULLIFY the NSA: Utah Activists Seek to Prohibit Utilities Service to Data Center via State Laws
Some NSA Opponents Want to 'Nullify' Surveillance With State Law
[link to www.usnews.com]

Activists say legislation can cut water, kill snooping at Utah Data Center

The National Security Agency has an Achilles heel, according to some anti-surveillance activists. The key vulnerability, according to members of the OffNow coalition of advocacy groups: The electronic spy agency's reliance on local utilities.

The activists would like to turn off the water to the NSA's $1.5 billion Utah Data Center in Bluffdale, Utah, and at other facilities around the country.

Dusting off the concept of "nullification," which historically referred to state attempts to block federal law, the coalition plans to push state laws to prohibit local authorities from cooperating with the NSA.

Draft state-level legislation called the Fourth Amendment Protection Act would – in theory – forbid local governments from providing services to federal agencies that collect electronic data from Americans without a personalized warrant.

No Utah lawmaker has came forward to introduce the suggested legislation yet, but at least one legislator has committed to doing so, according to Mike Maharrey of the Tenth Amendment Center. He declined to identify the lawmaker before the bill is introduced.

...

The city of Bluffdale successfully competed to be the location of the new NSA data center with an eye toward future economic development and offered discounted water rates, The Salt Lake Tribune reported Nov. 30. The city is reportedly charging the NSA a rate of $2.05 for every 1,000 gallons of water, significantly less than the typical rate for high-volume consumers of $3.35 per 1,000 gallons.

KSL-TV reported in July the center will use up to 1.7 million gallons of water a day when it's fully functional, in part to cool mega-computers that collect and store data from around the world. The data-hub is encountering some problems, the Wall Street Journal reported Oct. 7, with meltdowns obliterating thousands of dollars of equipment at the million-square-foot facility.

...

Ag47  (OP)

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12/03/2013 08:31 PM
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Re: NULLIFY the NSA: Utah Activists Seek to Prohibit Utilities Service to Data Center via State Laws
Ag47  (OP)

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12/03/2013 08:35 PM
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Re: NULLIFY the NSA: Utah Activists Seek to Prohibit Utilities Service to Data Center via State Laws
New Utah NSA center requires 1.7M gallons of water daily to operate
[link to www.ksl.com]

More secrets, more water? The NSA data center in Bluffdale could require as many as 1.7 million gallons of water per day to operate and keep computers cool.

Initial reported estimates suggested the center would use 1,200 gallons per minute, but more recent estimates suggest the usage could be closer to half that amount.

...

Bluffdale City manager Mark Reid described the NSA project and the new water and electrical infrastructure around it as a significant benefit to the city.

Reid said Bluffdale otherwise wouldn't have had the resources to improve the land all the way to the south end of the city limits. Instead, the government funded $7 million in infrastructure to the data center, and an additional $5 million in infrastructure back from the site that will allow a third of the water used at the facility to be recycled.

...

Upon hearing the initial estimates of the NSA center's water use, some residents were skeptical.

"We live in a desert and so it seems like an excess," said Barbara Ericksmoen. "Am I concerned about it? On the fence."

...

"At build-out, it will be several years before the data center uses that amount of water, so we have the opportunity to prepare for that through both conservation and developing new supplies,"
–Alan Packard, Jordan Valley River Conservancy District assistant general manager and chief engineer