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Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.

 
Anonymous Coward
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09/30/2014 09:57 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Great thread OP. I've been watching the ebola outbreak for months. I was just about to remove it from my feeds thinking it had gone stale when the recent headlines hit. Needless to say It's got me on the edge of my seat.

I think we're playing a waiting game at this point. I believe it's already here. (aside from our two star patients) Whether or not it gets a foothold remains to be seen.
 Quoting: Grindylows


My opinion as well. Although if th incubation period is real, then we'll all find out about it in a few weeks.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 35282601


Me thinks we are all fking crazy to not know without a doubt it is already here and its everywhere. You have a dumb fuck president that has left our border unchecked to the south....do you seriously think they are not weaponized Ebola and had people cross the border? You'd have to be out of your crazy mind to not know we are on the brink of full civil unrest and disruption in this country. It's coming and I hope to GOD you are all prepared....I know I am.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 51353269


This is all 100% by design. This is not an accident and if you believe it is.....the joke is on you. This was all created.....
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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09/30/2014 09:57 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Guys listen, this shit is scary. I get it, ok? I do. The human population of this world has always been kept in check by viruses, or some other method of sheer destruction. The Flu, Polio, Smallpox, you name it, these things have a purpose in nature. They keep populations under control.

Since the dawn of the industrial age we began to outsmart them all. We Vaccinate against the flu, we all but eradicated Polio in this country. We had beaten our enemies into near submission, and as a result, the worlds population has exploded. But our Genius is beginning to catch up with us. Anti-biotic resistant bacteria is on the rise, the flu is devising new ways to counter attack our defenses. And Ebola, well, lets just say it's doing what all viruses do. It's trying to survive, it's trying to find a way to use our own immune system against us. Think about this for a minute...

The Flu infects you, your body goes into defensive mode, realizing that it must expel the invader. So your own body fills your lungs with mucus and fluid, which forces you to cough. This is the real genius of the flu. It actually depends on your immune response to spread itself. And it doesn't have much time to do it either. Because your body begins to increase it's own temperature. Yes, having a fever is an immune response, not caused by the flu, rather it is literally your body attempting to make you so hot that the protein coat protecting the flu virus breaks down, allowing your white cells to attack.

This is what all viruses do. ALL of them. They find a way to exploit your natural immune responses to propagate themselves.

Ebola.... once just a hemorrhagic fever on steroids, now is a bona-fide menace. I work in a hospital laboratory at a major hospital in a major Metro Area. My wife works clinical micro for the same company. I'm very well versed in just about everything a STAT lab in a hospital can, and does do. My wife on the other hand, actually majored in micro, with emphasis on virology. So I wanted you all to know a few things about this outbreak that became apparent to us as it began to spread.

#1. Something has changed. This virus used to have a much shorter incubation period. And it would kill within a week. The mortality rate was much higher once upon a time. However, this is not the case anymore. Based on the sheer number of infected, the virus it seems, may have found a way to transmit itself easier. Typically when a virus "evolves" it gains in one area, while giving ground in another. It makes sense to me that Ebola gave up alot of it's lethality, for the ability to spread itself easier, and incubate much, much longer.

#2. Africa is a mess. There is no way to tell how many are infected. Once upon a time Ebola would strike a village and wipe everyone out, and that was it. It would kill so fast that it could not spread out of the hotzone. Because of what I said above that is not the case anymore. On a continent where borders still mean very little to the native population, it is a scary mix. Even if the CDC or the WHO wanted to get accurate numbers, it would be hopeless due to the unknown number or people that distrust western medicine, refuse to get help, or wander around from village to village. The infrastructure simply does not have the same capabilities we do in the west.

#3. Even in the United States, out of all the various hospitals I have worked at, there is no hope of containing anything like this. One of the largest hospitals I worked at only had two reverse flow isolation rooms. TWO, let that sink in for a minute. If this thing goes as bad as some think it will, we are, quite literally, screwed. Patients only show up to the hospital when they go symptomatic. So by the time they get there, they've already infected their entire family, their work group, and anyone they got within a few feet of on the way to the hospital. When they get there the ER nurses would treat it either like Flu, or Sepsis. But the whole time the patient is infecting all of them. And all of them, in turn, begin to infect everyone else in the exact same way. If this is as virulent as the WHO thinks it might be, by the time people realize what is going on, there will be more sick people than there would be beds available at every hospital in the US combined.

#4. Testing blood for anything is not as simple as looking under a microscope. And hospital labs are not set up for exotic virology. We run basic Chemistries, Cardiac enzymes, blood counts, sed rates, drug levels, bacterial cultures, all the basic hands on shit. The kind of things that old people usually present for, blood loss, infection, and cardiac events. Anything exotic gets sent out. Sometimes to the State lab, most of the time specimens get sent across the country to Quest Diagnostics, or to other organizations actually set up for it. Your average city hospital is pitifully, laughably, not ready for anything of this nature. Sure, running a CBC can tell if you are dehydrated, it can tell of you are loosing blood, it can tell if you are fighting "something" off. It just can't tell what. A sed rate can determine if you have excess inflammation, but it can't tell you why. A Lactic Acid level can indicate Sepsis, but it can't tell you from what. The point is, at the early stages of an outbreak, people will get treated for run of the mill things. Because nothing a hospital can test immediately will be able to tell anyone that you are carrying the most deadly hemorrhagic fever currently known. Honestly, if a person came into a busy ER with a fever, the triage nurse would put them in the waiting room until a non urgent room opened up in the back. They simply have no way to know who is carrying what.

I'm not saying we're all gonna die. This thing could fizzle out. And everything could be fine. What I am trying to illustrate here is that just because a lab exists in a hospital, does not mean that it can tell you everything. There are triage algorithms that work for everyday field medicine, but nothing for an outbreak. Thinking that living in a developed nation will curb the spread is ridiculous. If anything, it makes it worse. Our commute, our workplaces, our homes, our methods of entertainment, all of those things that we love so much about living in the the west, are the things that viruses depend on to spread.

If this virus truly has found a way to transmit easier, the healthcare system would be completely overloaded with something they simply can not handle.

Anyway, I'm not trying to scare anyone, I just hope people can be realistic about the capabilities of hospital containment, hospital laboratory testing, and the fact that the healthcare system, in ANY country, could not handle a massive outbreak.

So don't expect miracles from front line hospital staff, we don't have the tools, and we certainly do not have the manpower. Ask anyone in the medical field how much overtime they could work if they felt like it, don't even get me started on how thinly stretched people in the industry are. Though I suppose if this does turn into something, that will become apparent very, very fast.

Good luck, don't freak out, wash your hands, be prepared, hug your kids.

That is all.
 Quoting: Aravoth 35282601



I stop reading when you said that vaccines stop polio. That is an urban legend promoted by government and big pharma. Polio ran its course and anyone born prior to the mid 80's was injected with cancer causing monkey virus.

Dr. Tent is your friend OP.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 61679013


Thats fine, your funeral.
Anonymous Coward
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09/30/2014 09:57 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
OP - thanks for excellent information and discussion. Good to hear from th)ose behind the scenes who actually know what the medical lacks are.

My questions are:

1. Why didn't the US and other Western govts halt normal flights to and from West Africa immediately the outbreak became uncontrollable there? (Back in early August, say)

2. Why have Western govts and their medical/research agencies just seemed to ignore this current outbreak?

3. Who's been tinkering with this virus?

4.And, on a more general note, why oh why do our medical practitioners still have it drummed into them that 'all hoof-beats are horses'? The epidemic of misdiagnosis must rival Ebola's epidemic proportions - all because of this 'medicine-by-probability' nonsense.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 63340421


Excellent questions. I believe the head of the CDC, though, knows how bad it can get. He was calling for action over a month or two ago. As for gov'ts, I think it is just like Fukashima, they are either too ignorant or to politically correct to take action whenit is needed and wait until it is almost too late.
Anonymous Coward
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09/30/2014 10:07 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I knew that this was going to happen. It's predictable, knowledge of how the healthcare system works can tell anyone about how this will play out. This patient went to the ER symptomatic, and was sent home. Just like I said. American emergency medicine would treat this like the flu, or a cold, and that's exactly what they did. Basically he exposed everyone on the plane, everyone at the airport, everyone at his home, everyone at the ER twice.

Now CDC is in crisis mode. WHEN, this happens in my hospital, I will give you all an honest play by play on this thread, so look for it. In the meantime, don't forget what I said here, and feel free to ask me any questions you like.
 Quoting: Aravoth


The CDC will cover up as much as they can and hope it fizzles out but if they are wrong shit will get ugly. Information will eventually come out, peoples names, locations, etc.
Anonymous Coward
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09/30/2014 10:12 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Thanks OP for telling it like it is.

Any idea why the CDC and the WHO has not elected to quarantine all those coming from Africa at this point???

They have to know that if they don't they risk a worldwide pandemic at this point.
CDC R MORONS
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09/30/2014 10:36 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
For those that have already read the thread, remember what I said about what will happen once this thing gets into a city with an international airport.

At this point, Dallas is NOT the only city with someone spreading this disease.
 Quoting: Aravoth


THIS^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
HAPPENING RIGHT NOW AS WE TYPE
telling it straight

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09/30/2014 10:50 PM

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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
OP -
Thanks for an enlightening thread.

I have a question about Morgellons.
At your lab, do you notice strange (Morgellons) fibers in your petri-dishes that are not identifiable?

I am wondering how you treat such findings when/if they occur and are noticed?

thx
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 61267673


I work in clinical stat laboratory. We do not partake in any research whatsoever. We are simply a diagnostic extension of our physicians. The result we provide from our lab test are largely done to confirm an already known diagnosis. This is the case with every single inpatient STAT lab.

Kaiser Permanente was commissioned (by the CDC I believe) to study Morgellons at a research lab in California. I do not know what the results of the research was.

Never seen any fibers on plates, but in an inpateint lab for an otherwise unverified disease, it's most likely that those fibers would just be deemed a "containment" in the culture.

Not saying that right, or even moral, again, hospital labs just don't have the ability to run diagnostics on everything.


 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 35282601



OP, great thread and agree completely. I work as a hospital emergency trauma chaplain in an urban area and while i have very little medical training, i do know what you're saying is absolutely correct. "Isolation" consists of wearing a mask, gown and gloves entering a patient room. Hardly going to stop anything from traveling.

IF this should spread, what special preps (if any) do you think might be good for people to have on hand at home?

Last Edited by telling it straight on 09/30/2014 10:52 PM
Anonymous Coward
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09/30/2014 11:09 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
take ebola and ship it to the asshole of the earth for further processing
Anonymous Coward
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10/02/2014 11:35 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I hope you're still monitoring this thread OP, I have a couple of questions. As far as testing goes, what type of test is used for ebola diagnosis? At what point does the amount of testing individuals "overwhelm" testing abilities and personnel of a facility? If individual tests are used, approximately how many are circulating from the manufacturer(s) and is there a ramp up in the production of those especially if a worst case scenario presents itself?
Anonymous Coward
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10/03/2014 12:44 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I just found this forum and I'd like to say that I live in Canada on the edge of town,we have no factories in my town, I left for work at 6am and it was pouring out, as I walked to my truck the first thought I had was that the rain smelled like bleach, I have just finished reading that health Canada has removed the statement that they suspect that the Ebola virus could be airborne.. This comes as they have quarantined a patient with Ebola symptoms in Toronto
Aravoth

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10/03/2014 05:58 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I hope you're still monitoring this thread OP, I have a couple of questions. As far as testing goes, what type of test is used for Ebola diagnosis? At what point does the amount of testing individuals "overwhelm" testing abilities and personnel of a facility? If individual tests are used, approximately how many are circulating from the manufacturer(s) and is there a ramp up in the production of those especially if a worst case scenario presents itself?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 51728832


Honestly, it's gonna be a combination of things. Probably starting with a standard urinalysis, coagulation testing, checking a CBC, etc.

The panel we will draw isn't even an orderable test at this point.
March
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10/03/2014 06:27 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I hope you're still monitoring this thread OP, I have a couple of questions. As far as testing goes, what type of test is used for ebola diagnosis? At what point does the amount of testing individuals "overwhelm" testing abilities and personnel of a facility? If individual tests are used, approximately how many are circulating from the manufacturer(s) and is there a ramp up in the production of those especially if a worst case scenario presents itself?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 51728832


OP has predicted what happened in the past few days. I hope OP is reading this thread and will give us more updates.

Antibody/antigen based Ebola virus testing is not routinely manufactured, but manufacturers can catch up very quickly. They only need make more antibody/antigen, and there are enough equipment in the field to perform the testing.

However, RT-PCR based detection is extremely time consuming, I don't think there are many instruments available, and the capacities are very limited.
Aravoth

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10/03/2014 07:14 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I hope you're still monitoring this thread OP, I have a couple of questions. As far as testing goes, what type of test is used for ebola diagnosis? At what point does the amount of testing individuals "overwhelm" testing abilities and personnel of a facility? If individual tests are used, approximately how many are circulating from the manufacturer(s) and is there a ramp up in the production of those especially if a worst case scenario presents itself?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 51728832


OP has predicted what happened in the past few days. I hope OP is reading this thread and will give us more updates.

Antibody/antigen based Ebola virus testing is not routinely manufactured, but manufacturers can catch up very quickly. They only need make more antibody/antigen, and there are enough equipment in the field to perform the testing.

However, RT-PCR based detection is extremely time consuming, I don't think there are many instruments available, and the capacities are very limited.
 Quoting: March 1037394


Nothing off the top of my head, at least nothing automated. We run MRSA by PCR in the GenExpert, we can do flu in there also. But for full on respiratory panels it has to be sent out. Like I said before, this is pretty exotic, and hospital labs just don't have anything that can rapidly test for it.

That's why we have to wait 6+ hours, sometimes a full day to get a result.

I do find it interesting though, regarding the method of transmission of Ebola, that there was a study done in 1995 that determined aerosolized transmission of ebola was not only possible, but also a lot more plausible that previously thought.
Aravoth

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10/03/2014 07:30 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
OP - thanks for excellent information and discussion. Good to hear from th)ose behind the scenes who actually know what the medical lacks are.

My questions are:

1. Why didn't the US and other Western govts halt normal flights to and from West Africa immediately the outbreak became uncontrollable there? (Back in early August, say)

2. Why have Western govts and their medical/research agencies just seemed to ignore this current outbreak?

3. Who's been tinkering with this virus?

4.And, on a more general note, why oh why do our medical practitioners still have it drummed into them that 'all hoof-beats are horses'? The epidemic of misdiagnosis must rival Ebola's epidemic proportions - all because of this 'medicine-by-probability' nonsense.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 63340421


#1 Those reasons are purely economic in nature. Quarantine works, period. When the CDC is telling us that quarantining a family in Texas will work, but doing the same to a country won't, I am understandably, left scratching my head.

#2 Some agencies legitimately did not ignore it. And the WHO certainly was sounding the alarm months ago. I have no answer that makes any sense, other than to say that people tend to ignore practically everything until it happens in their own backyard.

#3 In my opinion? It doesn't matter, at all. Viruses will do there own genetic engineering. It's what they do. Like every other living thing on planet earth they are seemingly driven by the same primal force we all are. Finding a way to adapt, to be the strongest thing in their environment, and above all, spread their genetic code onward. For Ebola to gain a foothold, it needed a longer incubation period, and it need to be less lethal, otherwise it never would nest itself in the human population. It seems like that is what has happened.

#4 Some of it is due to the way people are triaged, and the fact that we still follow the same basic algorithm for field triage that dates back to the Civil War. The other problem is, like I said earlier....

You could not have picked a worse time for this to happen. Right at the beginning of flu season. Some years the flu can be so bad that 15% of the us population comes down with it. That's north of 40 million people infected with the flu during flu season. There is not enough space in every hospital in the US combined for those kind of numbers. Sense the symptoms for Ebola are nearly identical in the beginning to flu, medical offices and hospitals have no choice but to carry on as always.

There simply is not enough space to quarantine 40 million people.
Anonymous Coward
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10/03/2014 08:02 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola will do nothing.
 Quoting: T-Man


And your area of expertise is?

This ebola strain is different and the medical community is scared
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 60392737


My expertise is GLP and years and years of doom hype that didnt come. Just a few weeks ago it was ww3 with mh17.

we will be ok.
 Quoting: T-Man


My point exactly. By the first week of October of this year the ebola doom theme will be forgotten and replaced by another doom theme.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 44550379
Aravoth

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10/03/2014 08:07 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
...


And your area of expertise is?

This ebola strain is different and the medical community is scared
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 60392737


My expertise is GLP and years and years of doom hype that didnt come. Just a few weeks ago it was ww3 with mh17.

we will be ok.
 Quoting: T-Man


My point exactly. By the first week of October of this year the ebola doom theme will be forgotten and replaced by another doom theme.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 44550379

 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 54980830


This is the first week of October, and if there is one thing you should be afraid of, it's hemorrhagic fever.

This is real, this is happening. This isn't some stupid "in 2012 the photon belt will change our DNA" crap whipped up by someone trying to sell books to gullible people.

If you were open to taking advice I'd tell you to take it seriously, because it is serious.
juju

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10/04/2014 01:56 AM

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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Guys listen, this shit is scary. I get it, ok? I do. The human population of this world has always been kept in check by viruses, or some other method of sheer destruction. The Flu, Polio, Smallpox, you name it, these things have a purpose in nature. They keep populations under control.

Since the dawn of the industrial age we began to outsmart them all. We Vaccinate against the flu, we all but eradicated Polio in this country. We had beaten our enemies into near submission, and as a result, the worlds population has exploded. But our Genius is beginning to catch up with us. Anti-biotic resistant bacteria is on the rise, the flu is devising new ways to counter attack our defenses. And Ebola, well, lets just say it's doing what all viruses do. It's trying to survive, it's trying to find a way to use our own immune system against us. Think about this for a minute...

The Flu infects you, your body goes into defensive mode, realizing that it must expel the invader. So your own body fills your lungs with mucus and fluid, which forces you to cough. This is the real genius of the flu. It actually depends on your immune response to spread itself. And it doesn't have much time to do it either. Because your body begins to increase it's own temperature. Yes, having a fever is an immune response, not caused by the flu, rather it is literally your body attempting to make you so hot that the protein coat protecting the flu virus breaks down, allowing your white cells to attack.

This is what all viruses do. ALL of them. They find a way to exploit your natural immune responses to propagate themselves.

Ebola.... once just a hemorrhagic fever on steroids, now is a bona-fide menace. I work in a hospital laboratory at a major hospital in a major Metro Area. My wife works clinical micro for the same company. I'm very well versed in just about everything a STAT lab in a hospital can, and does do. My wife on the other hand, actually majored in micro, with emphasis on virology. So I wanted you all to know a few things about this outbreak that became apparent to us as it began to spread.

#1. Something has changed. This virus used to have a much shorter incubation period. And it would kill within a week. The mortality rate was much higher once upon a time. However, this is not the case anymore. Based on the sheer number of infected, the virus it seems, may have found a way to transmit itself easier. Typically when a virus "evolves" it gains in one area, while giving ground in another. It makes sense to me that Ebola gave up alot of it's lethality, for the ability to spread itself easier, and incubate much, much longer.

#2. Africa is a mess. There is no way to tell how many are infected. Once upon a time Ebola would strike a village and wipe everyone out, and that was it. It would kill so fast that it could not spread out of the hotzone. Because of what I said above that is not the case anymore. On a continent where borders still mean very little to the native population, it is a scary mix. Even if the CDC or the WHO wanted to get accurate numbers, it would be hopeless due to the unknown number or people that distrust western medicine, refuse to get help, or wander around from village to village. The infrastructure simply does not have the same capabilities we do in the west.

#3. Even in the United States, out of all the various hospitals I have worked at, there is no hope of containing anything like this. One of the largest hospitals I worked at only had two reverse flow isolation rooms. TWO, let that sink in for a minute. If this thing goes as bad as some think it will, we are, quite literally, screwed. Patients only show up to the hospital when they go symptomatic. So by the time they get there, they've already infected their entire family, their work group, and anyone they got within a few feet of on the way to the hospital. When they get there the ER nurses would treat it either like Flu, or Sepsis. But the whole time the patient is infecting all of them. And all of them, in turn, begin to infect everyone else in the exact same way. If this is as virulent as the WHO thinks it might be, by the time people realize what is going on, there will be more sick people than there would be beds available at every hospital in the US combined.

#4. Testing blood for anything is not as simple as looking under a microscope. And hospital labs are not set up for exotic virology. We run basic Chemistries, Cardiac enzymes, blood counts, sed rates, drug levels, bacterial cultures, all the basic hands on shit. The kind of things that old people usually present for, blood loss, infection, and cardiac events. Anything exotic gets sent out. Sometimes to the State lab, most of the time specimens get sent across the country to Quest Diagnostics, or to other organizations actually set up for it. Your average city hospital is pitifully, laughably, not ready for anything of this nature. Sure, running a CBC can tell if you are dehydrated, it can tell of you are loosing blood, it can tell if you are fighting "something" off. It just can't tell what. A sed rate can determine if you have excess inflammation, but it can't tell you why. A Lactic Acid level can indicate Sepsis, but it can't tell you from what. The point is, at the early stages of an outbreak, people will get treated for run of the mill things. Because nothing a hospital can test immediately will be able to tell anyone that you are carrying the most deadly hemorrhagic fever currently known. Honestly, if a person came into a busy ER with a fever, the triage nurse would put them in the waiting room until a non urgent room opened up in the back. They simply have no way to know who is carrying what.

I'm not saying we're all gonna die. This thing could fizzle out. And everything could be fine. What I am trying to illustrate here is that just because a lab exists in a hospital, does not mean that it can tell you everything. There are triage algorithms that work for everyday field medicine, but nothing for an outbreak. Thinking that living in a developed nation will curb the spread is ridiculous. If anything, it makes it worse. Our commute, our workplaces, our homes, our methods of entertainment, all of those things that we love so much about living in the the west, are the things that viruses depend on to spread.

If this virus truly has found a way to transmit easier, the healthcare system would be completely overloaded with something they simply can not handle.

Anyway, I'm not trying to scare anyone, I just hope people can be realistic about the capabilities of hospital containment, hospital laboratory testing, and the fact that the healthcare system, in ANY country, could not handle a massive outbreak.

So don't expect miracles from front line hospital staff, we don't have the tools, and we certainly do not have the manpower. Ask anyone in the medical field how much overtime they could work if they felt like it, don't even get me started on how thinly stretched people in the industry are. Though I suppose if this does turn into something, that will become apparent very, very fast.

Good luck, don't freak out, wash your hands, be prepared, hug your kids.

That is all.
 Quoting: Aravoth 35282601


Thank-you for the great post!

What has had me interested is that fact this has made the leap from forested to urban environment and is currently running outside of season.. Like the plague has a season you normally find ebola outbreaks within it's seasons (most typically dry conditions at the end of rainy season) with it seemingly breaking out of these known constraints the question is does it have the legs for further adaptations. I really hope not, but it worth noting each time it breaks free of known constraints..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 61272265




From this thread: Thread: Smoking Gun; what does USAMRIID research say about aerosolized Ebola Zaire?

“We also demonstrated aerosol transmission of Ebola virus at lower temperature and humidity than normally present in sub-Saharan Africa. Ebola virus sensitivity to the high temperatures and humidity in the thatched, mud and wattle huts shared by infected family members in southern Sudan and northern Zaire may have been a factor limiting aerosol transmission of Ebola virus in the African epidemics."

It surprised me to read this because I would have thought that that warmer temps and higher humidity would have helped rather than hinder the virus. The temperatures here will start falling as will the humidity which makes this very scary.
Anonymous Coward
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10/04/2014 02:13 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Toronto patient tested negative
Dallas patient is aparently dead.

No other results

SARS did a better fear porn job.

Ebola is fail.
Aravoth

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10/04/2014 05:16 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Toronto patient tested negative
Dallas patient is aparently dead.

No other results

SARS did a better fear porn job.

Ebola is fail.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 41493787


21 day incubation period, this is far from over.
Anonymous Coward
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10/06/2014 10:05 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Thanks guys for the input on testing. When in doubt, ask those that know and do!cheers
Aravoth

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10/07/2014 06:29 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Bump for awareness
Aravoth

User ID: 62806418
United States
10/12/2014 12:39 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
So today marks another diagnosis in Dallas.

Let me just say that this would mark the beginning of the third week from the time that Duncan was admitted to the ER at Presbyterian.

Which means that everyone he exposed during that time, if they did in fact catch it, they will start showing symptoms now, or throughout this week. I have a couple of concerns after watching the conference.

#1. The ER at Presbyterian is on divert, due to staffing issues. Not a stretch to think that the ER staff is calling out ill, because some of them are.

#2. It's been two weeks, exactly to the day that Duncan was admitted to the hospital, and it has been sixteen days since he showed up to the ER, symptomatic, and sent home.

#3. Incubation period is 2-21 days

#4. Average time prior to a patient becoming symptomatic is 8-10 days.

#5. Most hospital staff work in 2 week intervals. Meaning, their schedules repeat every two weeks.

#6. Most hospital staff work at least one weekend during that two week schedule block.

#7. It is more than plausible that the ER staff that should be working at Presbyterian today, is the same ER staff that saw him come through 14-16 days ago.

#8. If #7 is true, then those 18 employees they are monitoring most likely worked in that ER when Duncan came through. Which is why the ER is placed on Divert, due to staffing issues. Some of them are calling out sick. Because they are sick.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 50228112
United States
10/12/2014 12:54 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
So today marks another diagnosis in Dallas.

Let me just say that this would mark the beginning of the third week from the time that Duncan was admitted to the ER at Presbyterian.

Which means that everyone he exposed during that time, if they did in fact catch it, they will start showing symptoms now, or throughout this week. I have a couple of concerns after watching the conference.

#1. The ER at Presbyterian is on divert, due to staffing issues. Not a stretch to think that the ER staff is calling out ill, because some of them are.

#2. It's been two weeks, exactly to the day that Duncan was admitted to the hospital, and it has been sixteen days since he showed up to the ER, symptomatic, and sent home.

#3. Incubation period is 2-21 days

#4. Average time prior to a patient becoming symptomatic is 8-10 days.

#5. Most hospital staff work in 2 week intervals. Meaning, their schedules repeat every two weeks.

#6. Most hospital staff work at least one weekend during that two week schedule block.

#7. It is more than plausible that the ER staff that should be working at Presbyterian today, is the same ER staff that saw him come through 14-16 days ago.

#8. If #7 is true, then those 18 employees they are monitoring most likely worked in that ER when Duncan came through. Which is why the ER is placed on Divert, due to staffing issues. Some of them are calling out sick. Because they are sick.
 Quoting: Aravoth


You said when we start hearing about this in major cities that it will become a huge problem, care to comment on that now? I read when you posted this in August and something about it struck a cord with me, I guess I wasn't wrong to think you were a smart and more importantly genuine dude.
Aravoth

User ID: 62806418
United States
10/12/2014 01:12 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
So today marks another diagnosis in Dallas.

Let me just say that this would mark the beginning of the third week from the time that Duncan was admitted to the ER at Presbyterian.

Which means that everyone he exposed during that time, if they did in fact catch it, they will start showing symptoms now, or throughout this week. I have a couple of concerns after watching the conference.

#1. The ER at Presbyterian is on divert, due to staffing issues. Not a stretch to think that the ER staff is calling out ill, because some of them are.

#2. It's been two weeks, exactly to the day that Duncan was admitted to the hospital, and it has been sixteen days since he showed up to the ER, symptomatic, and sent home.

#3. Incubation period is 2-21 days

#4. Average time prior to a patient becoming symptomatic is 8-10 days.

#5. Most hospital staff work in 2 week intervals. Meaning, their schedules repeat every two weeks.

#6. Most hospital staff work at least one weekend during that two week schedule block.

#7. It is more than plausible that the ER staff that should be working at Presbyterian today, is the same ER staff that saw him come through 14-16 days ago.

#8. If #7 is true, then those 18 employees they are monitoring most likely worked in that ER when Duncan came through. Which is why the ER is placed on Divert, due to staffing issues. Some of them are calling out sick. Because they are sick.
 Quoting: Aravoth


You said when we start hearing about this in major cities that it will become a huge problem, care to comment on that now? I read when you posted this in August and something about it struck a cord with me, I guess I wasn't wrong to think you were a smart and more importantly genuine dude.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 50228112


Thanks for the comments.

I'm more than certain CDC is hiding things from the public and has been since the beginning. They are probably trying to avoid a panic.

They won't release the nurses Identity yet because any patient, and their families that came in contact with her in the last ten days is going to flip out. Not to mention the coworkers she exposed.

Also, we do not know yet how large of a Viral Load is needed to transmit the virus. So we don't know yet if you are contagious when you go symptomatic, or if you are contagious days before that.

This is going to be a scary week I think. Today marks the 16th day that Duncan first walked into that ER and was sent home. We're going to find out just how many people he infected this week.

That is, if the CDC actually tells us. Which they probably won't. But you can tell already, it's got them worried. Presbyterian cleared out the intensive care unit just to care for Ebola patients. They are anticipating more.

Remember exposure is exponential. Duncan has exposed 48 people outside of the healthcare system, and 18 in it. All of those people can do just as much damage as he did.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 18195560
United States
10/12/2014 08:51 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola will do nothing.
 Quoting: T-Man


^ Hope and change ^

ohappy
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 33921706
United States
10/13/2014 04:59 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
keep the population under 250 million



seems legit^

we must find the t 2014 cornerstone thingy and throw it into the flaming volcano of MORDOR


or the consequences will never be the same my dear friends

the shitsorm of our time has all the makings of a good

fat people porno such as


Thar She Blows or Moby Dick or You Gunna Eat That?

or Fuck me In My Rascal or Lick My Bloated Feet

or Vericose Veins Under My Flabby
Pajamas look like Shiny Purple Rivers
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 33921706
United States
10/13/2014 05:04 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola will do nothing.
 Quoting: T-Man


Before there was a Universe There Was Nothing


Nothing Looks Pretty Damn Powerful from that angle
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 58351648
United States
10/13/2014 05:19 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
You're right, this stuff happens.

The Black Plague is the closest case we have to compare.

That killed anywhere from 30 to 60 percent of Europes population over 7 years.

Think about THAT.....in 7 years time, you could loose 2-4 people in a group of 6.

Everyone will know someone who dies from Ebola IF it spreads.


and it appears it is spreading.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 2712120
United States
10/13/2014 05:24 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
maybe op needs to get a clue about the first strain of ebola to been found on this planet was admited later on to be man made research on Bovine Spongiform encelophatis...Mad cow disease.

The WHO and the CDC are statistic gathering services and we are just test subjects.

Ebola zaire strain which was first to go out of control after the infamous Philadelphia hotel incident with what was called the "legionaire disease"..which turned out to be of the SAME PROTEIN CHAIN!!!

Also Hiv and sars are based of the same protein chain as of Ebola...

This Oil based sickness is coming and they planned it since 2001!
 Quoting: Blitz the storm-striker


That sounds bezerk.
 Quoting: Tinfoil Couture


this and the FACT that vaccines have been poisoning peeps w contaminants in the squalene and heavy metals, NOT helping them… once you find people who have sifted through all the bogus science this will be clear to you… there are undoubtedly some good threads on GLP with much of the data you need to be sure vaccines were never needed and do not work and worse, poison peeps of their own FREE WILL… this was designed by certain families in the 20th century and is all documented...

also, your population growth analysis is also total bunk…

if you want to be worried about something, you might consider that we are cursing ourselves with all of the perversity in our culture and this will lead to bad things happening to us…

better to sound the alarm for rampant porn, violent films, video games, music, whoring generally, etc…

this is the true source of anything bad that will happen…by our own FREE WILL CHOICES…
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 61057149


Woah, WOAH! WOAH!!!!! HOLD IT!!!!!!

YOU SAID "OIL-BASED SICKNESS....."

PLEASE EXPLAIN.

YES, I'M YELLING. I'M FREAKING OUT!
Remember: Me tel u....

"It" said, "OIL GET BIG SICKNESS......"

Am i connecting dots I shouldn't be?!?!?!?!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 55034042
United States
10/13/2014 05:31 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
whateverbsflag
 Quoting: Vaellene


Gee thanks for the insight. I always wonder how people like you have green karma. There was no BS in the post. Of all the fucking dip shit posts on GLP you decide to BS this one, so, fuck off.





GLP