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It feels like something's up..

 
FiFtEeN

User ID: 125393
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08/03/2006 05:57 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
dumbass? jeez
1dunno1


What of it? I call it as I see it.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 125974

Was it the viagra joke? I guess a limp peepee is serious to those that realy have the problem.Sorry
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

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08/03/2006 06:02 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
Enough punching below the belt you two...

I'm interested in this 9th av stuff...

Does it start at 12AM Isreal time tonight or did it already start at 12AM their time this morning?
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

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08/03/2006 06:05 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
Tisha B'Av
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from 9th of Av)


Tisha B'Av or Tish'ah b'Av (Hebrew: tish‘a-h b?-a-b_) is a major annual fast day in Judaism. Its name denotes the ninth day (Tisha) of the Jewish month of Av, which falls in the high summer. It has been called the "saddest day in Jewish history".[1]


Background

The destructions

The fast commemorates two of the saddest events in Jewish history -- the destruction of the First Temple (originially built by King Solomon), and the destruction of the Second Temple. Those two events occurred about 656 years apart, but both in the same month, Av, and, as tradition has it, both on the ninth day.

In connection with the fall of Jerusalem three other fast-days were established at the same time as the Ninth Day of Av: these were the Tenth of Tevet, when the siege began; the Seventeenth of Tammuz, when the first breach was made in the wall; and the Third of Tishrei, known as the Fast of Gedaliah, the day when Gedaliah was assassinated (II Kings 25:25; Jeremiah 41:2). From Zechariah 7:5, 8:19 it appears that after the building of the Second Temple the custom of keeping these fast-days was temporarily discontinued. Since the destruction of Jerusalem and of the Second Temple by the Romans, the four fast-days have again been observed.


After the Exodus

On this day in the year 1312 BCE, the generation of Jews who came out of Egypt under Moses' leadership 16 months earlier were condemned to die in the wilderness (midbar) and the entry into the Land of Israel was delayed for 40 years until the old generation died out.


The five calamities

According to the Mishnah (Taanit, 4:6), five specific events occurred on the ninth of Av that warrant fasting:

On this day, the Twelve spies sent by Moses to observe the land of Canaan. Two of the spies brought a positive report, but 10 of the spies brought an "evil report" about the land that caused the Children of Israel to cry, panic and despair of ever entering the "Promised land". For this, they were punished by G-d that they would not enter, and that for all generations the day would become one of crying and misfortune for the descendants of the Children of Israel, the Jewish people. (See Numbers ch 13-14)

Solomon's Temple (the First Temple) and the Kingdom of Judah were destroyed by the Babylonians led by Nebuchadnezzar in 586 BCE and the Judeans were sent into the Babylonian exile.

The Second Temple was destroyed by the Roman Empire in 70 CE scattering the people of Judea and commencing a two thousand year Jewish exile.

The Bar Kokhba's revolt against Rome failed, and Bar Kokhba was killed, as was Rabbi Akiva and many other important sages of the Mishnah, and Betar was destroyed.
Following the Siege of Jerusalem, the subsequent razing of Jerusalem occurred one year later.

According to the Talmud (Tractate Taanit), the destruction of the Second Temple began on that date and was finally consumed by the flames on the next day -- the Tenth of Av.

Later calamities on 9 Av

A large number of calamities are alleged to have occurred on the ninth of Av:

The declaration of the Crusades by Pope Urban II in 1095

The burning of the Talmud in 1242

In 1290, the signature of the edict by King Edward I expelling the Jews from England

The Alhambra decree was put into effect, leading to the Jewish expulsion from Spain in 1492

The First World War started in 1914

The first killings at Treblinka took place in 1942

The AMIA Bombing (Asociación Mutua Israelita Argentina) by Arab terrorists on July 18, 1994 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, which killed 86 and wounded more than 120.
The purpose of the day is not to institute annual commemorations of historical disasters. Rather, they are commemorated on Tisha B'Av. Examples are the destruction of many Jewish communities in the Rhineland during the Crusades. The liturgy often makes mention of specific instances (see below).


Holocaust (Shoah)

Most Haredi Jews also see Tisha B'Av as a remembrance day for the six million Jews killed by the Nazis during the Holocaust. Modern Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews remember these on a special day instituted by the government of Israel, called Yom HaShoah. Haredi rabbinical leaders view the institution of a new permanent day of mourning or celebration in our times as disproportionate, which is why Haredi Jews do not observe Yom Hazikaron either.


Observances

Restrictions

As on Yom Kippur, Tisha B'Av is observed as a full day fast that lasts 25 hours (sometimes longer, depending on where one is located), beginning with sunset and ending with nightfall the subsequent day. There are six main prohibitions:

Not wearing leather shoes.

Abstaining from all food and drink (unless this would be life-threatening)

Abstaining from washing or bathing of any kind. Some authorities state that washing solely for the sake of hygiene is acceptable.

Abstaining from applying creams or oils. Skin creams and makeup are included in this prohibition.

Abstaining from sexual relations, hugging, kissing and all other forms of physical affection.

Abstaining from studying Torah, though reading Lamentations, Job, some sections of Jeremiah and sections of the Talmud that deal with the laws of mourning is allowed.[2]

Also, if possible, not working until after chatzot (midday).

Although the fast ends at nightfall, eating meat and drinking wine are prohibited until noon of the following day. According to tradition, the Temple burned all night and most of the day of the tenth of Av.[3]

During services in synagogue, and when returning home, from nightfall until mid-day, one is required to sit on the floor or on low chairs, as during shiv'ah (the week of mourning observed after the death of a first-degree relative). Some even have the custom of sleeping on the floor or other modification to the normal sleeping routine. (Sleeping without pillows is a common modification for people who find it very difficult to sleep on the floor, but Jews with diabetes or another medical condition where sleeping without the head elevated would be harmful to them (their eyes, in the case of a diabetic) are permitted to sleep with pillows as they normally would). People must refrain from greeting each other or sending gifts on this day. Old prayerbooks and Torahs are often buried on this day.

The laws of Tisha B'Av are recorded in the Shulkhan Arukh (the "Code of Jewish Law") Orach Chayim 552-557.


Services

The scroll of Eichah (Lamentations) is read in synagogue during the evening services. In addition, most of the morning is spent reading kinoth ("dirges"), most bewailing the loss of the Temples and the subsequent persecutions, but many others referring to post-exile disasters. These later kinnoth were composed by various poets (often prominent Rabbis) who had either suffered in the events mentioned or relate received reports. Important kinnoth were composed by Elazar ha-Kalir and Rabbi Judah ha-Levi. After the Holocaust, kinnoth were composed by the German-born Rabbi Shimon Schwab (in 1959, at the request of Rabbi Joseph Breuer) and by Rabbi Solomon Halberstam, leader of the Bobov Hasidim (in 1984).


History of the observance

In the long period which is reflected in Talmudic literature the observance of the Ninth Day of Av assumed a character of constantly growing sadness and asceticism. By the end of the second century or at the beginning of the third, the celebration of the day had lost much of its gloom. Rabbi Judah ha-Nasi was in favor of abolishing it altogether or, according to another version, of lessening its severity when the fast has been postponed from Saturday to Sunday (Talmud, Tractate Megillah 5b).

The growing strictness in the observance of mourning customs in connection with the Ninth Day of Av became pronounced in post-Talmudic times, and particularly in the darkest period of Jewish life, from the fifteenth century to the eighteenth.

Maimonides (twelfth century), in his Mishneh Torah, says that the restrictions as to the eating of meat and the drinking of wine refer only to the last meal before fasting on the Eighth Day of Av, if taken after noon, but before noon anything may be eaten (Hilchoth Ta'anith 5:8). Rabbi Moses of Coucy (thirteenth century) wrote that it is the universal custom to refrain from meat and wine during the whole day preceding the Ninth of Av (Sefer Mitzvoth ha-Gadol, Venice ed., Laws of Tishah B'Av, 249b). Rabbi Joseph Caro (sixteenth century) says some are accustomed to abstain from meat and wine from the beginning of the week in which the Ninth Day of Av falls; and still others abstain throughout the three weeks from the Seventeenth of Tammuz (Shulkhan Arukh, Orach Chayim 551).

A gradual extension of prohibitions can be traced in the abstention from marrying at this season and in other signs of mourning. So Rabbi Moses of Coucy says that some do not use the tefillin ("phylacteries") on the Ninth Day of Av, a custom which later was universally observed (it is now postponed until the afternoon). In this manner all customs originally designated as marks of unusual piety finally became the rule for all.


In light of Israel's establishment

According to Orthodox Judaism
Until the arrival of the Jewish Messiah, Orthodox Judaism will continue to observe this day as a fast. When the Messiah comes, acording to Jewish tradition, it will become a great celebration.


Religious Zionism's ideas
In the 20th century, with the re-establishment of a Jewish state in the Land of Israel, a small number of religious Zionists opined that the commemoration of Tisha B'Av would have to be modified, and possibly overturned, but this has been rejected by the majority.


Conservative and Masorti ideas
The law committee of the Masorti Movement (Conservative Judaism in the State of Israel) issued responsa on the question "In our time do we still have to fast for the whole of Tish'a b'Av, seeing that our sovereign independence has been regained? May we reduce the outward signs of mourning and permit eating after the Minchah Service?" Two responsa were given:

Rabbi Theodore Friedman wrote that: "There is already an historical precedent in Megillat Ta'anit which stipulated days on which we may not fast because of salvation wrought for Israel. In our time we have been vouchsafed a great salvation in the establishment of the State... It therefore seems to us that this great historical turning point in Israel's history should be celebrated by not completing the fast on 9th Av, but concluding it after the midday Minchah."

Rabbi David Golinkin wrote,[4] concluding "It is forbidden to fast only half the day on Tish'a b'Av for several reasons:
we have demonstrated that during the period of the Second Temple they did fast on Tish'a b'Av...
From the halakhic point of view this is not possible. Either we must fast on all four of the fasts [and Tisha b'Av] or on Tish'a b'Av alone...
From the ideological point of view, we cannot yet say that we have reached the period of "peace". We should revert to the custom of the Ge'onim ... and fast the whole day on Tish'a b'Av and declare the other fast days to be voluntary and not compulsory."

Other traditions

Classical Jewish sources maintain that the Jewish Messiah will be born on Tisha B'Av.

This is based on the following Midrashic tale: A non-Jew interpreted a cow's moo as a sign of the Temple's destruction. When the cow mooed again, he asserted that the Messiah had been born. The Christians, in their debate with Don Isaac Abrabanel, used this as proof that Messiah lived during the period of the Temple's destruction, thus allowing Jesus to be the Jewish Messiah. Abarbenel held that this story is a metaphor.


[link to en.wikipedia.org]
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
FiFtEeN

User ID: 125393
United States
08/03/2006 06:09 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
Jewish Year 5766 : sunset August 2, 2006 - nightfall August 3, 2006
Johnny Danger
User ID: 116563
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08/03/2006 06:09 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
Abstaining from sexual relations, hugging, kissing and all other forms of physical affection.

So THAT'S why I'm not Jewish!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 125974
United States
08/03/2006 06:11 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
Jewish Year 5766 : sunset August 2, 2006 - nightfall August 3, 2006
 Quoting: FiFtEeN

oh and when do we start the fast?

and on what day do we morn the worst?
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

User ID: 119757
United Kingdom
08/03/2006 06:15 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
"Tisha B'Av is observed as a full day fast that lasts 25 hours (sometimes longer, depending on where one is located), beginning with sunset and ending with nightfall the subsequent day."

Here it states sundown, not 12AM...
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

User ID: 119757
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08/03/2006 06:22 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
125974, why don't you educate us... you appear to be in the know!
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

User ID: 119757
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08/03/2006 06:24 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
"Classical Jewish sources maintain that the Jewish Messiah will be born on Tisha B'Av."

I think this bit is pretty darn interesting too!
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
CAVEMAN

User ID: 68673
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08/03/2006 07:38 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
It's 2:30 PM in Jerusalem right now. lflash
ARE YOU READY?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 126029
Canada
08/03/2006 07:53 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
"It feels like something's up.. "



I don't know know it off hand but if you'll hum a few bars...
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

User ID: 119757
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08/03/2006 08:00 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
I prefer to whistle, personally! heh.
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 121182
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08/03/2006 09:19 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
Whatever happens will be no big deal.

Unless! Someone blows up the Dome of the Rock.
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

User ID: 119757
United Kingdom
08/10/2006 05:25 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
This must be what my Spidey sense was picking up on!

[link to www.godlikeproductions.com]
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"
Lips Like Sugar  (OP)

User ID: 119757
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09/04/2006 09:52 AM
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Re: It feels like something's up..
My Spidey senses are acting up again today... they aren't acting up like they were a few weeks ago, thankfully... but I'm definitely sensing something!
"Lips Like Sugar, Sugar Kisses"





GLP