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I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader

 
THIS IS BAD!!!
User ID: 138280
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09/03/2006 08:26 AM
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I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader
Not the US, Not Iran, Not the Iraqi Government.....Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani is the POWER in Iraq....this isn't good at all!!!

I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader

By Gethin Chamberlain and Aqeel Hussein in Baghdad


(Filed: 03/09/2006)



The most influential moderate Shia leader in Iraq has abandoned attempts to restrain his followers, admitting that there is nothing he can do to prevent the country sliding towards civil war.

Aides say Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani is angry and disappointed that Shias are ignoring his calls for calm and are switching their allegiance in their thousands to more militant groups which promise protection from Sunni violence and revenge for attacks.


Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani
"I will not be a political leader any more," he told aides. "I am only happy to receive questions about religious matters."

It is a devastating blow to the remaining hopes for a peaceful solution in Iraq and spells trouble for British forces, who are based in and around the Shia stronghold of Basra.

The cleric is regarded as the most important Shia religious leader in Iraq and has been a moderating influence since the invasion of 2003. He ended the fighting in Najaf between Muqtada al-Sadr's Mehdi army and American forces in 2004 and was instrumental in persuading the Shia factions to fight the 2005 elections under the single banner of the United Alliance.

However, the extent to which he has become marginalised was demonstrated last week when fighting broke out in Diwaniya between Iraqi soldiers and al-Sadr's Mehdi army. With dozens dead, al-Sistani's appeals for calm were ignored. Instead, the provincial governor had to travel to Najaf to see al-Sadr, who ended the fighting with one telephone call.

Al-Sistani's aides say that he has chosen to stay silent rather than suffer the ignominy of being ignored. Ali al-Jaberi, a spokesman for the cleric in Khadamiyah, said that he was furious that his followers had turned away from him and ignored his calls for moderation.

Asked whether Ayatollah al-Sistani could prevent a civil war, Mr al-Jaberi replied: "Honestly, I think not. He is very angry, very disappointed."

He said a series of snubs had contributed to Ayatollah al-Sistani's decision. "He asked the politicians to ask the Americans to make a timetable for leaving but they disappointed him," he said. "After the war, the politicians were visiting him every month. If they wanted to do something, they visited him. But no one has visited him for two or three months. He is very angry that this is happening now. He sees this as very bad."

A report from the Pentagon on Friday said that the core conflict in Iraq had changed from a battle against insurgents to an increasingly bloody fight between Shia and Sunni Muslims, creating conditions that could lead to civil war. It noted that attacks rose by 24 per cent to 792 per week the highest of the war and daily Iraqi casualties soared by 51 per cent to almost 120, prompting some ordinary Iraqis to look to illegal militias for their safety and sometimes for social needs and welfare.


An Iraqi Shi'ite supporter of cleric Moqtada Al Sadr celebrates near a burning US Army truck


Hundreds of thousands of people have turned away from al-Sistani to the far more aggressive al-Sadr. Sabah Ali, 22, an engineering student at Baghdad University, said that he had switched allegiance after the murder of his brother by Sunni gunmen. "I went to Sistani asking for revenge for my brother," he said. "They said go to the police, they couldn't do anything.

"But even if the police arrest them, they will release them for money, because the police are bad people. So I went to the al-Sadr office. I told them about the terrorists' family. They said, 'Don't worry, we'll get revenge for your brother'. Two days later, Sadr's people had killed nine of the terrorists, so I felt I had revenge for my brother. I believe Sadr is the only one protecting the Shia against the terrorists."

According to al-Sadr's aides, he owes his success to keeping in touch with the people. "He meets his representatives every week or every day. Sistani only meets his representatives every month," said his spokesman, Sheik Hussein al-Aboudi.

"Muqtada al-Sadr asks them what the situation is on the street, are there any fights against the Shia, he is asking all the time. So the people become close to al-Sadr because he is closer to them than Sistani. Sistani is the ayatollah, he is very expert in Islam, but not as a politician."

Even the Iraqi army seems to have accepted that things have changed. First Lieut Jaffar al-Mayahi, an Iraqi National Guard officer, said many soldiers accepted that al-Sadr's Mehdi army was protecting Shias. "When they go to checkpoints and their vehicles are searched, they say they are Mehdi army and they are allowed through. But if we stop Sistani's people we sometimes arrest them and take away their weapons."

Western diplomats fear that the vacuum will be filled by the more radical Shia clerics, hastening the break-up of the country and an increase in sectarian violence.

Sir Jeremy Greenstock, Britain's former special representative for Iraq, said the decline in Ayatollah al-Sistani's influence was bad news for Iraq.

"It would be a pity if his strong instincts to maintain the unity of Iraq and to forswear violence were removed from influencing the scene," he said.

[link to www.telegraph.co.uk]
BRIDAS

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09/03/2006 09:41 AM
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Re: I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader
And will this spill over into Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East?
The Reptilian Elite are planning economic collapse, martial law and micro-chipping next year (2007).
Anonymous Coward
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09/03/2006 09:46 AM
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Re: I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader
And will this spill over into Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East?
 Quoting: BRIDAS


I think it already has, Turkey and Iran are both meddling in Northern Iraq, the Kurds are US supported and pushing for their own Kurdistan while Sunnis and Shi'ites argue amongst themselves and the extent of Bush's foolishness in ignoring these factions and thinking Iraq would be a 'cakewalk' becomes ever more obvious.
BRIDAS

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09/03/2006 09:48 AM
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Re: I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader
And will this spill over into Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East?


I think it already has, Turkey and Iran are both meddling in Northern Iraq, the Kurds are US supported and pushing for their own Kurdistan while Sunnis and Shi'ites argue amongst themselves and the extent of Bush's foolishness in ignoring these factions and thinking Iraq would be a 'cakewalk' becomes ever more obvious.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 125095


I think you`re right. Now, was this the plan all along?
The Reptilian Elite are planning economic collapse, martial law and micro-chipping next year (2007).
19.47

User ID: 115428
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09/03/2006 09:56 AM
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Re: I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader
KDNothing to worry about, go back to sleep sheeple.
Anonymous Coward
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09/03/2006 10:10 AM
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Re: I no longer have power to save Iraq from civil war, warns Shia leader
Now, was this the plan all along?
 Quoting: BRIDAS


Bridas, if I knew that, I'd know where it goes next and as much as I've bent my waking hours to articles and maps and attempted logic, I'm always wrong and my hindsight is 20/20 lol.

I think Bush fucked up in Iraq, but they're in too deep and will not give over the small gains they've made at any cost.
Now they're about to make the same mistakes in Iran, and because they're sitting safely in the US, not spending their own lives, their own dollars, on pursuit of the end game, they see no reason not to go ahead with it.





GLP