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Dental x-ray safety question

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 63369947
United States
05/26/2015 10:15 PM
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Dental x-ray safety question
My dental office is an open floor plan- there are no doors to separate each room, just doorways.
Thoughts?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 16753985
United States
05/26/2015 10:27 PM
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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
My dental office is an open floor plan- there are no doors to separate each room, just doorways.
Thoughts?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 63369947



Can you see the x-ray machine from where you sit ?

.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 2823155
United States
05/26/2015 10:49 PM
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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
My dental office is an open floor plan- there are no doors to separate each room, just doorways.
Thoughts?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 63369947



Can you see the x-ray machine from where you sit ?

.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 16753985


I'm not sure what you mean- would the actual machine be the thing the hygienist steps "outside" to flip the switch on? What's worrying me most is that while one of my sons was getting x-rayed, the other went to get a drink of water from the dispenser which was right outside the doorway of the room in which the x-ray was being performed.
pish
Turtle Hermit

User ID: 51383753
United States
05/26/2015 11:06 PM

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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
3 things to keep in mind.

Time
Distance
Shielding

Time- X-rays are a milliseconds of exposure (except for something like a cut scan, fluoro, or angio study. So no big deal.

Distance- more distance equals less radiation. Also have to take into account the direction the beam is traveling. While it does " bounce" (think of a billiard ball on the sides of the table) every time it does so it looses strength. Generally a rule of thumb is 6 feet is a safe distance for 99% of standard X-rays.

Shielding- anything between you and the X-rays limit there effect. Most areas designed for X-rays have lead shielding in the walls, floor, or ceiling where applicable. Son should have been wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield to minimize body dose and scatter radiation.

X-ray tech
Always remember these words: Work hard, study well, and eat and sleep plenty! That is the Turtle Hermit way! We must master the art of peace in addition to the art of war!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 16753985
United States
05/26/2015 11:10 PM
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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
My dental office is an open floor plan- there are no doors to separate each room, just doorways.
Thoughts?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 63369947



Can you see the x-ray machine from where you sit ?

.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 16753985


I'm not sure what you mean- would the actual machine be the thing the hygienist steps "outside" to flip the switch on? What's worrying me most is that while one of my sons was getting x-rayed, the other went to get a drink of water from the dispenser which was right outside the doorway of the room in which the x-ray was being performed.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 2823155



OMFG!!! You can't DO that, Get a Drink of water while a machine is taking an X-ray!!!...Hurry Quick ! Chop off your son's dick!!! NOW!!! His offspring will be hideous !!! It'll be WORSE THAN CERN!!!!....God fucking please SAVE US ALL !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 2823155
United States
05/26/2015 11:31 PM
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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
3 things to keep in mind.

Time
Distance
Shielding

Time- X-rays are a milliseconds of exposure (except for something like a cut scan, fluoro, or angio study. So no big deal.

Distance- more distance equals less radiation. Also have to take into account the direction the beam is traveling. While it does " bounce" (think of a billiard ball on the sides of the table) every time it does so it looses strength. Generally a rule of thumb is 6 feet is a safe distance for 99% of standard X-rays.

Shielding- anything between you and the X-rays limit there effect. Most areas designed for X-rays have lead shielding in the walls, floor, or ceiling where applicable. Son should have been wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield to minimize body dose and scatter radiation.

X-ray tech
 Quoting: pish


Thank you for your response. Son receiving the x-ray wore the led apron, but was not offered a thyroid shield. Will ask next time. What are your thoughts on protecting the brain? I wonder if a second apron was used to cover the head would it serve as protection or perhaps bounce the radiation around, trapping it, intensifying, it, I don't freaking know.

Personally, I would prefer to just get a professional cleaning kit and forego dental appointments completely, but DH is a believer.
pish
Turtle Hermit

User ID: 51383753
United States
05/26/2015 11:51 PM

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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
3 things to keep in mind.

Time
Distance
Shielding

Time- X-rays are a milliseconds of exposure (except for something like a cut scan, fluoro, or angio study. So no big deal.

Distance- more distance equals less radiation. Also have to take into account the direction the beam is traveling. While it does " bounce" (think of a billiard ball on the sides of the table) every time it does so it looses strength. Generally a rule of thumb is 6 feet is a safe distance for 99% of standard X-rays.

Shielding- anything between you and the X-rays limit there effect. Most areas designed for X-rays have lead shielding in the walls, floor, or ceiling where applicable. Son should have been wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield to minimize body dose and scatter radiation.

X-ray tech
 Quoting: pish


Thank you for your response. Son receiving the x-ray wore the led apron, but was not offered a thyroid shield. Will ask next time. What are your thoughts on protecting the brain? I wonder if a second apron was used to cover the head would it serve as protection or perhaps bounce the radiation around, trapping it, intensifying, it, I don't freaking know.

Personally, I would prefer to just get a professional cleaning kit and forego dental appointments completely, but DH is a believer.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 2823155


Because the beam/ collimator is next to their jaw, the X-rays have less distance to disperse, so the exposure to the brain is minimized. Never heard of a head shield, and sometimes shielding can compromise X-ray detail so I think he's protected as much as possible , though I would ask for a thyroid shield, as its sensitive to X-rays.

Bottom line is X-rays are useful as a dusgnistic tool, but you want to have as little as possible.
Always remember these words: Work hard, study well, and eat and sleep plenty! That is the Turtle Hermit way! We must master the art of peace in addition to the art of war!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 69094910
United States
05/26/2015 11:58 PM
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Re: Dental x-ray safety question
3 things to keep in mind.

Time
Distance
Shielding

Time- X-rays are a milliseconds of exposure (except for something like a cut scan, fluoro, or angio study. So no big deal.

Distance- more distance equals less radiation. Also have to take into account the direction the beam is traveling. While it does " bounce" (think of a billiard ball on the sides of the table) every time it does so it looses strength. Generally a rule of thumb is 6 feet is a safe distance for 99% of standard X-rays.

Shielding- anything between you and the X-rays limit there effect. Most areas designed for X-rays have lead shielding in the walls, floor, or ceiling where applicable. Son should have been wearing a lead apron and thyroid shield to minimize body dose and scatter radiation.

X-ray tech
 Quoting: pish


I think to say it is "no big deal" may be misleading - they put cumulative exposure limits for a reason, We make a trade off with X-RAYS - the potential risk is seen as being offset by the health benefits they provide (imaging), but they are cancer causing and there is risk. It isn't disputed like the microwave spectrum, it is well known and accepted by all that X-RAYS in themslves are dangerous.





GLP