Godlike Productions - Discussion Forum
Users Online Now: 2,214 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 289,533
Pageviews Today: 662,679Threads Today: 323Posts Today: 5,416
09:30 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health

 
mercury2
TREMENDOUS CASH FLOW PICTURE

User ID: 163339
United States
11/28/2006 03:18 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
I hope to keep adding to this thread, and will start with Rosemary. I just had lunch, I fried some leftover baked potatoes in olive oil and added tons of cayenne, rosemary, and parsley. Had a couple of free range eggs along with it, and cheese and salsa. I am feeling pretty good right now.

Here is some information about Rosemary from the site Mountain Rose Herbs [link to www.mountainroseherbs.com]

Rosemary Leaf and Herb Profile

Also known as- Rosmarinus officinalis. Romero, and Dew of the Sea.
Introduction

Rosemary is an aromatic evergreen mint that grows to a height of about three feet (one meter). It bears narrow, thick, needle-like green leaves and pale blue to violet flowers. The leaves and the essential oil distilled form the leaves are used in herbal medicine. Food manufacturers add rosemary to meats and sauces as an antioxidant and stabilizer. The herb is also used to make liqueurs, such as Benedictine and Danziger Goldwasser.
Constituents

1,8-cineole, acetic acid, camphor, carnosol, carvacrol, carvone, caryophyllene, chlorogenic acid, geraniol, hesperidin, limonene, luteolin, rosmarinic acid, salicylates.
Parts Used

Dried leaf.
Typical Preparations

Teas and tinctures, however it is most popularly used in cooking. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy but should not be taken internally.
Summary

* Antioxidant, antiseptic, and antispasmodic- Rrosemary is a key herb in European herbal medicine. For centuries, rosemary has been used to treat arthritis, baldness, headaches, stomach upset, pains, strains, cuts, scrapes, and bruises. Contemporary scientific research suggests that rosemary may be useful for:
* Alzheimer's disease- phytochemicals in rosemary may prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine, a chemical that allows neurons within the brain to communicate with each other.
* Cancer- several laboratory studies suggest that rosemary contains compounds that prevent carcinogenic chemicals from binding to and inducing mutations in DNA.
* Circulatory problems- the camphor content in finely chopped rosemary or essential oil of rosemary to bath water helps stimulate blood circulation the skin.
* Eczema- increased circulation in the skin after application of rosemary may carry away inflammatory chemicals.
Indigestion. And Rosemary can help prevent abdominal cramps.
* Irritable bowel syndrome- Rosemary relieves intestinal cramps and spasms by stimulating the release of bile that helps digest fat. It also relieves bloating and gas.
* Menstrual cramps- antioxidant compounds in rosemary prevent uterine spasms.
* Yeast infection- Rosemary is not fungicidal but also diuretic. It stops growth of yeast and helps remove yeast cells from the lining of the urinary tract.

Precautions

Women who have heavy periods should avoid excessive use of rosemary, since it stimulate menstrual flow. The herb should not be used medicinally during pregnancy. Small amounts of rosemary used in cooking, however, are safe for pregnant women and for women who have heavy periods.



For educational purposes only
This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
mercury2  (OP)
TREMENDOUS CASH FLOW PICTURE

User ID: 163878
United States
11/29/2006 08:28 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
How about Cinnamon, I did not know you could use this against yeast infections and bladder infections . . good to know.

Cinnamon
Soothes indigestion, controls blood sugar in diabetics, prevents stomach ulcers, wards off urinary tract infections, fights tooth decay and gum disease, prevents vaginal yeast infections

Hot apple cider tastes flat without a cinnamon stick, and toast, cookies, candies and fruit salads all benefit from a generous sprinkle of cinnamon powder. But cinnamon is more than just a kitchen spice. It's been used medicinally for thousands of years. Modern science has confirmed its value for preventing infection and indigestion and has also discovered a couple of new therapeutic uses for the herb.

Cinnamon comes from the bark of an Asian tree. (The sticks are actually pieces of bark.) Ancient Chinese herbals mention it as early as 2700 BC, and Chinese herbalists still recommend it for fever, diarrhea and menstrual problems. Cinnamon was an ingredient in ancient Egyptian embalming mixtures. In the Bible, Moses used it in holy anointing oil.

After the fall of Rome, trade between Europe and Asia became difficult, but cinnamon was so prized that it still found its way west. The 12th-century German abbess and herbalist Hildegard of Bingen recommended it as "the universal spice for sinuses," and to treat colds, flu, cancer and "inner decay and slime," whatever that means.
Boastful Benefits

Several toothpastes are flavored with cinnamon, and for good reason. "Like all the spices used in curries," says Daniel B. Mowrey, Ph.D., director of the American Phytotherapy Research Laboratory in Salt Lake City, Utah, and author of The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine, "cinnamon is an antiseptic that helps kill the bacteria that cause tooth decay and gum disease." Cinnamon also kills many disease-causing fungi and viruses. One German study showed it "suppresses completely" the cause of most urinary tract infections (Escherichia coli bacteria) and the fungus responsible for vaginal yeast infections (Candida albicans).

Like many culinary spices, cinnamon helps soothe the stomach. But a Japanese animal study revealed that it also may help prevent ulcers.

It also appears to help people with diabetes metabolize sugar. In one form of diabetes (Type II, or non-insulin-dependent), the pancreas produces insulin, but the body cannot use it efficiently to break down glucose-the simple sugar that fuels body functions. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) researchers discovered that cinnamon reduces the amount of insulin necessary for glucose metabolism.
Putting the herb to work

One-eighth of a teaspoon of cinnamon triples insulin efficiency," says James A. Duke, Ph.D., a botanist retired from the USDA and author of The CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Dr. Duke suggests that people with Type II diabetes discuss cinnamon's benefits with their doctor.

In foods, simply season to taste. For people with diabetes, 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon of ground cinnamon per meal may help control blood sugar levels.

To brew a stomach-soothing tea, use 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon of powdered herb per cup of boiling water. Steep 10 to 20 minutes. Drink up to three cups a day.

In powdered form, culinary amounts of cinnamon are nontoxic, although allergic reactions are possible. Cinnamon oil, however, is a different story. On the skin, it may cause redness and burning. Taken internally, it can cause nausea, vomiting and possibly even kidney damage. Don't ingest cinnamon oil.

[link to www.organicfood.co.uk]
mercury2  (OP)
TREMENDOUS CASH FLOW PICTURE

User ID: 163878
United States
11/29/2006 08:37 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Here's a whole article on this subject:

A cook's guide to medicinal herbs - includes recipes and a guide to common herbs - The Herbalist
Judy Krizmanic

TO THE BEGINNER, herbal medicine can seem exotic and mysterious, full of unfamiliar plants with confusing uses. But entering the world of herbal healing is easy; you most likely have the makings of a well-stocked herbal medicine chest right in your pantry. Many common cooking herbs actually have therapeutic value. Do you have rosemary in your spice rack? Thyme? Oregano? Garlic? Ginger? All can be a part of a pharmacy of therapeutic herbs.

Most culinary herbs were first used medicinally. Ancient Egyptian medical texts recommended garlic for ailments ranging from headaches to heart problems. Practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine, an ancient healing system from India, have for centuries used herbs such as coriander, cardamom, cumin and turmeric to bring patients' health into balance. America's 19th century Eclectic physicians, who studied the scientific basis for herbs' medicinal properties and used herbs in their practices, employed thyme as an antiseptic and a digestive aid, and cinnamon to treat fever, diarrhea and postpartum hemorrhaging.

Over the years and around the world, cooks have used herbs both for flavor and for therapeutic value. Most culinary herbs have carminative properties, meaning that they aid in digestion. Italian cooks began using basil not just for its savory taste but to balance the acidity of the tomatoes in their dishes. Central and South Americans knew that capsicum, or ground chili peppers, not only added zing to their bean dishes but also helped prevent gas. Indian cuisine offers perhaps the finest lesson in combining the culinary and medicinal uses of herbs. In India, many people are vegetarian for spiritual reasons, but according to Ayurvedic principles, a vegetarian diet is too cooling to the body and is associated with weak digestion. Indian cooks mastered the art of using warming blends of spices or curries to compensate for this deficiency, and to strengthen and stimulate digestion.

These days, most people in the Western world think of food and medicine as unrelated, but a variety of studies give credence to many traditional medical uses of culinary herbs. The most-researched by far is garlic: Dozens of studies confirm its broad-spectrum antibiotic properties, as well as its ability to reduce blood pressure and lower cholesterol. Research indicates that ginger helps reduce cholesterol and motion sickness, and that it has infection-fighting and anti-inflammatory properties. Studies also show that thymol, a constituent of thyme and oregano, helps relax the muscles of the gastrointestinal tract, thus improving digestion. Research has shown that curcumin, the active chemical in turmeric, has antiinflammatory value, supporting its traditional use for arthritis. Even common parsley has merit: One study indicates it may inhibit the secretion of histamine, the chemical that triggers allergy symptoms.

How much herb must you use to obtain its medicinal value? It's not really possible to obtain an adequate dosage of an herb by simply using the amount you normally would in cooking--a half teaspoon here, a quarter teaspoon there. To heal significant problems, you would follow a regimen of larger dosages in the form of herb capsules, teas or tinctures.

Nevertheless, the regular, generous use of herbs in a variety of dishes can enhance the value of a healing herbal program. When used consistently and in significant amounts, many culinary herbs also provide a tonifying effect, strengthening various organs and systems of the body, and thus playing a role in preventive medicine. For example, thyme is considered a tonic for the respiratory system, parsley for the urinary system, and garlic for the circulatory, respiratory and digestive systems, as well as for the skin. "When you cook with herbs, your food becomes a part of your overall program for well-being," says herbalist Rosemary Gladstar, author of Healing Herbs for Women (Fireside, 1993). "Our food really needs to be a part of our whole approach to health."

There are many ways to season your diet with the health benefits of culinary herbs. The most obvious way is to get into the habit of using plenty of herbs, either fresh or dried, in your favorite recipes: Use cumin, coriander and turmeric to season curried vegetable stews. Make rosemary potatoes. Or toss a handful of mint into your favorite salad. Because of individual taste preferences, it's difficult to talk specific dosages when you're dealing with culinary herbs. Generally, if you were trying to improve a chronic health condition, you would take 1/2 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon of dried herb or a combination of herbs three times a day; this would equal about four to six herb capsules, a generally recommended dosage for chronic situations. This isn't practical for all herbs and all taste buds. But if you gradually increase the amounts of herbs in your recipes, you'll probably develop a taste for more strongly spiced dishes.

The rule, quite simply, is to be generous. "Just a pinch of this and a pinch of that is out," says Gladstar. "Great restaurants and famous cooks use herbs liberally." Look for herbs in bulk at your natural food store. Even better, plant them in your garden or on your windowsill; they're fun to grow and need minimal care. When cooking, add delicate, leafy herbs toward the end of the recipe, because cooking destroys the volatile oils that hold medicinal properties.

Another way to add therapeutic herbs to your diet is to make your own herbal condiments, such as an herb-rich salad dressing or a seasoning mix. (See recipes, p. 83.) If you need to strengthen your digestive system, for example, Gladstar recommends mixing up a batch of dried fennel, fenugreek and cinnamon. Keep the seasoning on hand to sprinkle on foods on a regular basis. A salad dressing made with gingko, rosemary, gotu kola--all of which are regarded as brain tonics--and perhaps a little thyme and garlic is a tasty way to boost your brain power. For drying up mucus in late winter colds, Michael Tierra, herbalist and author of The Way of Herbs (Unity Press, 1980), recommends a formula made from two parts aniseed, one part black pepper and one part ginger, moistened with honey to form a paste; take 1/2 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon a day.

Most culinary herbs can also be made into tasty and therapeutic teas. Ginger tea-made by steeping 2 teaspoons of powdered or grated root in one cup of boiled water for 10 minutes--is an effective remedy for nausea, morning sickness, colds, flu and arthritis. Teas can be made the same way from rosemary, thyme, sage, crushed caraway seeds or fennel seeds, or just about any other culinary herb. (If you are pregnant or nursing, be sure to consult a knowledgeable herbalist before using herbs medicinally.)

Exploring culinary herbs' ability to heal is a wonderful means of gently easing your way into the world of herbs. Ed Smith, an herbalist and founder and president of the Herb Pharm, an herbal products company in Williams, Ore., regularly steers his clients straight to the kitchen to learn about herbs. "I quite often get phone calls from people who have a cold or flu and they [say they] don't have any herbs in the house," he says. "I ask them, 'Well, what do you have on your spice rack?'"

Immune Support Vinegar

This vinegar, rich with immune-boosting herbs, will strengthen your system and add zip to salads. Fresh herbs are best, but dried will work too. Warm the vinegar before using to help to release the herbs' beneficial properties. (Except for the peppers, amounts of individual herbs isn't that important; just fill the jar with what you have on hand.)

Pack a clean jar full of: Echinacea leaves and seeds, shiitake mushrooms (fresh or dried), garlic cloves, thyme, basil, 2 whole cayenne peppers

POUR APPLE CIDER VINEGAR over herbs to cover. Cap tightly; let sit 4 to 6 weeks. Use as you would any vinegar.

Garden Vegetable Powder

Sprinkle this savory digestive tonic onto your favorite dishes. Mix up as large a batch as you'd like. (Dulse powder comes from seaweed and is available at natural food stores.)

3 parts dried basil

1 part dried thyme

1/2 part oregano

1/2 part marjoram

1 part garlic granules

2 parts toasted and ground sesame

seeds

1/2 part dulse powder

RELATED ARTICIE: A PHARMACY IN YOUR PANTRY

The following are some common culinary herbs that also can be used medicinally. Keep in mind that even though herbs are natural, they sometimes can have side effects. Before using an herb medicinally, thoroughly research its use. The following are good resources: The Healing Herbs, by Michael Castleman (Rodale Press, 1991); The Herbal Handbook: A User's Guide to Medical Herbalism, by David Hoffmann (Healing Arts Press, 1988); Nutritional Herbology, by Mark Pedersen (Pedersen Publishing, 1987); and Planetary Herbology, by Michael Tierra (Lotus Press, 1988).

BASIL (OCIMUM BASILICUM): Used in treating colds, flu, fever, stomach cramps, constipation, vomiting, headaches and menstrual pains.

CARAWAY (CARUM CARVI): The seeds soothe the digestive tract and help eliminate gas.

CAYENNE (CAPSICUM ANNUUM): Tonic for circulatory and digestive systems. Good for fever, infection and body cleansing.

CINNAMON (CINNAMOMUM ZEYLANICUM): Traditionally used to treat fever, diarrhea, menstrual problems and post-partum bleeding. Also a digestive aid.

CLOVE (SYZYGIUM AROMATICUM): Aids digestion.

CORIANDER (CORIANDRUM SATIVUM): Used as a digestive aid for thousands of years. Both seeds and leaves may be used in a tea for strengthening the urinary tract and treating urinary tract infections.

CUMIN (CUMINUM CYMINUM): A digestive aid.

FENNEL (FOENICULUM VULGARE): For aiding digestion and expelling gas. Studies suggest it may be antibacterial.

FENUGREEK (TRIGONELLA FOENUM-GRAECUM): One of the oldest medicinal herbs, used by Hippocrates. An anti-inflammatory. Helps clear up coughs.

GARLIC (ALLIUM SATIVUM): A wealth of research shows garlic's antibiotic properties and its role in lowering cholesterol, reducing blood pressure, reducing risk of blood clots and reducing blood sugar levels.

GINGER (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE): An excellent remedy for motion sickness, morning sickness and menstrual cramps. Also for aiding digestion, fighting infections and stimulating circulation.

MARJORAM (ORIGANUM MAJORANA): Digestive aid and possible treatment for herpes. Also used as a cough remedy and a tranquilizer.

MINTS (MENTHA SPP.): Peppermint may help prevent stomach ulcers, according to some studies. All mints are good digestive aids.

OREGANO (ORIGANUM SPP.): Actually a wild species of marjoram, it's good for digestion and as an expectorant for coughs, colds and chest congestion.

PARSLEY (PETROSELINUM CRISPUM): Research suggests it may be beneficial in treating high blood pressure and in quieting allergy symptoms.

ROSEMARY (ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS): Has a tonifying and calming effect on digestion. May help reduce nasal and chest congestion. Acts as a circulatory- and nervous-system stimulant. Used in treating headaches.

SAGE (SALVIA OFFICINALIS): Used for insomnia, depression and menstrual problems. Sage gargle is good for sore throats. Externally, sage is used as an antiperspirant and antibacterial.

THYME (THYMUS VULGARIS): Thymol, the active constituent, has antibacterial and anti-fungal properties and has long been used as an ingredient in mouthwash. Good for treating sore throats, laryngitis and coughs. A good anti-spasmodic for the digestive system.

TURMERIC (CURCUMA LONGA): Several studies show anti-inflammatory properties, making it a good treatment for arthritis. Stimulates bile and helps digest fats.
[link to findarticles.com]

COPYRIGHT 1995 Vegetarian Times, Inc. All rights reserved.
COPYRIGHT 2000 Gale Group
mercury2  (OP)
TREMENDOUS CASH FLOW PICTURE

User ID: 307727
United States
10/04/2007 01:18 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Okay, I admit I am bumping my own old thread. But there was a thread today about some guys in England calling for the banning of all herbal medicine.

Culinary herbs and spices will never be banned, so it might behoove all of us to learn about them. I have been using a lot more of these in my cooking since I started buying them in bulk quantities from San Francisco Herb Co. [link to www.sfherb.com]

I really like that company, they are about my favorite internet vendor. I don't like Monterey Bay Spice Co. so much [link to www.herbco.com] but they sell everything in 1/4 lb quantities as well as one lb so that can be useful too when you can't use a whole pound. To be honest it's so cheap to buy by the whole pound at San Francisco Herb that you might as well get the pound and break it up and share it with your friends or for Christmas presents.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 307757
United Kingdom
10/04/2007 01:41 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Thank you for the information! hf
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 298158
United States
10/04/2007 01:48 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Damn Right!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 284977
United States
10/04/2007 01:55 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Good Stuff!

Also, while not an herb, you might want to add honey to the list. One of the best topical antibiotics known to man - you'd never get that from big pharma, but it works wonders on just about any cut or infection...
mercury2  (OP)
TREMENDOUS CASH FLOW PICTURE

User ID: 102279
United States
10/04/2007 02:21 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Good Stuff!

Also, while not an herb, you might want to add honey to the list. One of the best topical antibiotics known to man - you'd never get that from big pharma, but it works wonders on just about any cut or infection...
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 284977

This is how I've been using honey and cinnamon, I put them in my coffee, first I put some honey in the bottom of the empty cup, then add a bunch of cinnamon powder. I mix those together before I pour the coffee in. This makes the cinnamon mix in without floating on top or making big lumps.

I also put honey and cinnamon in yogurt with some ground flax seed.

Did both those things this morning.

You are smart to bring up the honey, it fits in with the thread topic very well, the medicinal properties of things they can't ban. Like vinegar. Read more about vinegar, honey, baking soda, borax, and other household products as medicine at

[link to www.earthclinic.com]

Earth Clinic could almost be a "sister site" to GLP.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 8925
United States
10/04/2007 03:44 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
hf bump
malu

User ID: 206474
United States
10/04/2007 04:08 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
great post mercury, will add to my favorites, i have been a big fan of herb gardens since i was a kid, most will grow in any soil, and a 3x6 area will grow enough herbs to keep you busy and cooking for a year! there is nothing quite like cooking with fresh herbs, or having them hang in your kitchen to dry
add unfilter unpasturized apple cider vinegar to your list of things, nice to add fresh herbs to a bottle and add vinegar, best of both worlds when you use them
"By way of deception, thou shalt do war."

Israel's Mossad

"The truth shall set you free."

U.S. Central Intelligence Agency Motto
mercury2 nli
User ID: 307840
United States
10/04/2007 05:11 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
THYME (do not confuse the herb thyme with the essential oil of thyme. The essential oil can be hazardous, but not the herb.)

From Mountain Rose Herbs again:

Thyme Leaf and Herb Profile
Also known as- Thymus vulgaris, Creeping Thyme, French Thyme, Garden Thyme, Common Thyme, Mountain Thyme.
Botanists refer to the species of the herb used in cooking as garden thyme and to another plant as "thyme."

Introduction
An aromatic herb in the mint family, thyme grows to a height of fifteen inches (about 40 cm), with small rounded leaves and pink flowers on woody stems. This herb is not the same species as mother of thyme of wild thyme.
Experts in language tell us that thymeÍs name was derived form the Greek word thumus, or courage. In Medieval times, knights wore sprigs of thyme on their armor as a sign of courage. The scent of thyme was thought to give them strength in the midst of battle, as well as relief form pain.

Constituents
Alpha-linolenic acid, anethole, apigenin, borneol, caffeic acid, calcium, chromium, eugenol, ferulic acid, geraniol, kaempferol, limonene, lithium, luteolin, magnesium, manganese, methionine, p-coumaric acid, potassium, rosmarinic acid, selenium, thymol, tryptophan, ursolic acid.

Parts Used
The dried leaf.

Typical Preparations
Teas, tinctures, baths, gargles, toothpaste.

Summary
Oil of thyme is the main ingredient in the mouthwash Listerine. Thyme is a strong antiseptic used externally for infected cuts and scrapes and infernally for oral and respiratory infections.
Bath washes made from teas of thyme allowed to cool treat fungal infections such as athleteÍs foot and also vaginal yeast infections. Thyme contains tannins that cause proteins in skin to cross-link, forming a barrier to infection.
Teas of thyme can be taken orally to treat allergies, asthma, colds, and coughs. The essential oil in the herb encourages coughing up of phlegm It stops spasms of the bronchial passages. Inhaling essential oil of thyme placed in hot water as aromatherapy has the same benefits.

Precautions
No one should take thyme oil internally. Women who are pregnant should not drink thyme tea, although small amounts of thyme used in cooking do not cause side effects. Do not take thyme as a medicine if you have a duodenal ulcer or if you have thyroid disease.
gooderboy

User ID: 68834
United States
10/04/2007 05:30 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Gooder for you mercury2... and yes indeedy too... them herbs and spices are for sure just the bestest ever. Just in the last couple of years too... I have been more and more getting into putting them, and/or mixing them in might be better, with/in all of my flower/shrub landscapings out there. That neato keen purple basil looks great next to my white coneflowers, and me pepper plants fit right in as the base plantings for two of my rose of sharons... and well... I'm learnin', and adding.... and for like the first time, and cuz I now have the room... I am really able to get into the wonder-filled world of them culinary delights... and I loves it!... sooo, and anyways... thanks too!
Aria
User ID: 307848
United States
10/04/2007 05:34 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
Thanks! You must have been a medicine man or woman, in your past life! :)
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 218423
United States
10/04/2007 06:07 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
u2efine
Great post. Thanks for all the links.
mercury2  (OP)
TREMENDOUS CASH FLOW PICTURE

User ID: 424672
United States
04/28/2008 03:58 PM

Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: The health benefits of ordinary culinary herbs and spices - improve your cooking and your health
With that post malu made today about legislation in Canada to criminalize almost all beneficial vitamins, herbs, and dietary supplements, this information could be more valuable than ever. You never know when it might come in handy. I sure use a lot more herbs, spices, and garlic in my cooking than I ever have before. I think it makes a difference in my health, and it certainly makes my simple diet more interesting!





GLP