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Everybody Loves a Final Countdown

 
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Cicada 3301

33 = Phi

01 = Phi

phi
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


phi h f
 Quoting: xenophon


Thanks for posting that. I didn't remember what the smiley name was for it.

I did learn something new from Cicada the other day in relation to gematria calculations.

I have only run a few test, but it seems to hold true for 369 numbers.

Example

If you plug Cicada into gematria calculator you get 21 for Jewish and Simple

C = 3
I = 9
C = 3
A = 1
D = 4
A = 1

I wondered what would happen if I choose different letters, but still held on to the 369 relation.

So I changed a few letters.

F = 6
I = 9
F = 6
A = 1
A = 1
A = 1

This gives you the number 24 for both Jewish and Simple gematria.

Maybe just a trivial example, but I suspect there is more to be learned from the calculation results as a whole.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Interesting, post some more examples when you find them. Speaking of cicada

To the ancient Greeks the cicada symbolised resurrection, rebirth and immortality and is mentioned as being sacred to the ancient Greek sun god Apollo. Homer mentions cicadas in the Iliad around 900 BC and compares the discourse of "sage chiefs exempt from war" to the song of the cicada.

Ancient Greeks and Chinese made a habit of keeping male cicadas in cages for the pleasure of hearing them sing. One Greek ode to the cicada says: "We call you happy, O cicada, because after you have drunk a little dew in the treetops you sing like a queen".

Cicadas also had a powerful effect on artists as they feature on numerous coins both before and after the time of Christ. A number of beautiful gems have also been found from around 300 BC carved in the likeness of the cicada. The cicada's emergence from the earth was a powerful symbol for ancient Romans with members of the nobility taking to wearing a gold brooch featuring a cicada to hold back their hair.

In Taoism the cicada is the symbol of the hsien, or soul, disengaging itself from the body at death. Cicadas also feature in Japanese carvings on small medicine boxes and they are mentioned in ancient Hindu law as long ago as 200 BC in India.

[link to www.abc.net.au]
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Interesting, post some more examples when you find them. Speaking of cicada

To the ancient Greeks the cicada symbolised resurrection, rebirth and immortality and is mentioned as being sacred to the ancient Greek sun god Apollo. Homer mentions cicadas in the Iliad around 900 BC and compares the discourse of "sage chiefs exempt from war" to the song of the cicada.

Ancient Greeks and Chinese made a habit of keeping male cicadas in cages for the pleasure of hearing them sing. One Greek ode to the cicada says: "We call you happy, O cicada, because after you have drunk a little dew in the treetops you sing like a queen".

Cicadas also had a powerful effect on artists as they feature on numerous coins both before and after the time of Christ. A number of beautiful gems have also been found from around 300 BC carved in the likeness of the cicada. The cicada's emergence from the earth was a powerful symbol for ancient Romans with members of the nobility taking to wearing a gold brooch featuring a cicada to hold back their hair.

In Taoism the cicada is the symbol of the hsien, or soul, disengaging itself from the body at death. Cicadas also feature in Japanese carvings on small medicine boxes and they are mentioned in ancient Hindu law as long ago as 200 BC in India.

[link to www.abc.net.au]
 Quoting: xenophon


I like this background information.

I've always liked the numbers behind cicadas.
Maybe because many of the cycles are prime.

I think maybe they have a close connection to solar cycles as well.

I can remember listening to their song last solar max, and how it would change as the Kp index did.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Interesting, post some more examples when you find them. Speaking of cicada

To the ancient Greeks the cicada symbolised resurrection, rebirth and immortality and is mentioned as being sacred to the ancient Greek sun god Apollo. Homer mentions cicadas in the Iliad around 900 BC and compares the discourse of "sage chiefs exempt from war" to the song of the cicada.

Ancient Greeks and Chinese made a habit of keeping male cicadas in cages for the pleasure of hearing them sing. One Greek ode to the cicada says: "We call you happy, O cicada, because after you have drunk a little dew in the treetops you sing like a queen".

Cicadas also had a powerful effect on artists as they feature on numerous coins both before and after the time of Christ. A number of beautiful gems have also been found from around 300 BC carved in the likeness of the cicada. The cicada's emergence from the earth was a powerful symbol for ancient Romans with members of the nobility taking to wearing a gold brooch featuring a cicada to hold back their hair.

In Taoism the cicada is the symbol of the hsien, or soul, disengaging itself from the body at death. Cicadas also feature in Japanese carvings on small medicine boxes and they are mentioned in ancient Hindu law as long ago as 200 BC in India.

[link to www.abc.net.au]
 Quoting: xenophon


I like this background information.

I've always liked the numbers behind cicadas.
Maybe because many of the cycles are prime.

I think maybe they have a close connection to solar cycles as well.

I can remember listening to their song last solar max, and how it would change as the Kp index did.

 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Likely another reason cicada is associated with Apollo

Prime cycles. That's not something you hear everyday
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Interesting, post some more examples when you find them. Speaking of cicada

To the ancient Greeks the cicada symbolised resurrection, rebirth and immortality and is mentioned as being sacred to the ancient Greek sun god Apollo. Homer mentions cicadas in the Iliad around 900 BC and compares the discourse of "sage chiefs exempt from war" to the song of the cicada.

Ancient Greeks and Chinese made a habit of keeping male cicadas in cages for the pleasure of hearing them sing. One Greek ode to the cicada says: "We call you happy, O cicada, because after you have drunk a little dew in the treetops you sing like a queen".

Cicadas also had a powerful effect on artists as they feature on numerous coins both before and after the time of Christ. A number of beautiful gems have also been found from around 300 BC carved in the likeness of the cicada. The cicada's emergence from the earth was a powerful symbol for ancient Romans with members of the nobility taking to wearing a gold brooch featuring a cicada to hold back their hair.

In Taoism the cicada is the symbol of the hsien, or soul, disengaging itself from the body at death. Cicadas also feature in Japanese carvings on small medicine boxes and they are mentioned in ancient Hindu law as long ago as 200 BC in India.

[link to www.abc.net.au]
 Quoting: xenophon


I like this background information.

I've always liked the numbers behind cicadas.
Maybe because many of the cycles are prime.

I think maybe they have a close connection to solar cycles as well.

I can remember listening to their song last solar max, and how it would change as the Kp index did.

 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Likely another reason cicada is associated with Apollo

Prime cycles. That's not something you hear everyday
 Quoting: xenophon


I kinda missed all the Cicada 3301 puzzles when they happened, but they read like a puzzle intended for me to solve. In almost every puzzle case I have the correct knowledge base to solve them.

Puzzles or no puzzles, the information leads to a greater understanding of nature, and how it tics.
Phi <3
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02/11/2019 02:34 AM
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Interesting, post some more examples when you find them. Speaking of cicada

To the ancient Greeks the cicada symbolised resurrection, rebirth and immortality and is mentioned as being sacred to the ancient Greek sun god Apollo. Homer mentions cicadas in the Iliad around 900 BC and compares the discourse of "sage chiefs exempt from war" to the song of the cicada.

Ancient Greeks and Chinese made a habit of keeping male cicadas in cages for the pleasure of hearing them sing. One Greek ode to the cicada says: "We call you happy, O cicada, because after you have drunk a little dew in the treetops you sing like a queen".

Cicadas also had a powerful effect on artists as they feature on numerous coins both before and after the time of Christ. A number of beautiful gems have also been found from around 300 BC carved in the likeness of the cicada. The cicada's emergence from the earth was a powerful symbol for ancient Romans with members of the nobility taking to wearing a gold brooch featuring a cicada to hold back their hair.

In Taoism the cicada is the symbol of the hsien, or soul, disengaging itself from the body at death. Cicadas also feature in Japanese carvings on small medicine boxes and they are mentioned in ancient Hindu law as long ago as 200 BC in India.

[link to www.abc.net.au]
 Quoting: xenophon


I like this background information.

I've always liked the numbers behind cicadas.
Maybe because many of the cycles are prime.

I think maybe they have a close connection to solar cycles as well.

I can remember listening to their song last solar max, and how it would change as the Kp index did.

 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Likely another reason cicada is associated with Apollo

Prime cycles. That's not something you hear everyday
 Quoting: xenophon


I kinda missed all the Cicada 3301 puzzles when they happened, but they read like a puzzle intended for me to solve. In almost every puzzle case I have the correct knowledge base to solve them.

Puzzles or no puzzles, the information leads to a greater understanding of nature, and how it tics.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


A greater understanding of nature in all aspects is one of the best things we can strive for. Pity there's so much missing and bullshit out there. Has to be more of a personal quest til the overall understanding improves, something unified/universal and less deceptive/divisive
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
...


I like this background information.

I've always liked the numbers behind cicadas.
Maybe because many of the cycles are prime.

I think maybe they have a close connection to solar cycles as well.

I can remember listening to their song last solar max, and how it would change as the Kp index did.

 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Likely another reason cicada is associated with Apollo

Prime cycles. That's not something you hear everyday
 Quoting: xenophon


I kinda missed all the Cicada 3301 puzzles when they happened, but they read like a puzzle intended for me to solve. In almost every puzzle case I have the correct knowledge base to solve them.

Puzzles or no puzzles, the information leads to a greater understanding of nature, and how it tics.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


A greater understanding of nature in all aspects is one of the best things we can strive for. Pity there's so much missing and bullshit out there. Has to be more of a personal quest til the overall understanding improves, something unified/universal and less deceptive/divisive
 Quoting: xenophon


It's not something you can really teach.

As you say it has to be a personal quest.

You have to draw the circles and connect the dots in your own time to understand the big picture.

I think the main issue is the world we know is built upon people not being able to see the big picture. When the masses see it, the world will have to change.

I don't fear that outcome. It's easier to reset the whole damn planet than get everybody on the same page.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
...


Likely another reason cicada is associated with Apollo

Prime cycles. That's not something you hear everyday
 Quoting: xenophon


I kinda missed all the Cicada 3301 puzzles when they happened, but they read like a puzzle intended for me to solve. In almost every puzzle case I have the correct knowledge base to solve them.

Puzzles or no puzzles, the information leads to a greater understanding of nature, and how it tics.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


A greater understanding of nature in all aspects is one of the best things we can strive for. Pity there's so much missing and bullshit out there. Has to be more of a personal quest til the overall understanding improves, something unified/universal and less deceptive/divisive
 Quoting: xenophon


It's not something you can really teach.

As you say it has to be a personal quest.

You have to draw the circles and connect the dots in your own time to understand the big picture.

I think the main issue is the world we know is built upon people not being able to see the big picture. When the masses see it, the world will have to change.


 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Aye

I don't fear that outcome. It's easier to reset the whole damn planet than get everybody on the same page.

LOL
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown

Eye_998
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


flawless v 00
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


flawless v 00
 Quoting: xenophon


Giants. chuckle

I think we might be giants. It just requires different energies on the planet to support such a form.


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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


flawless v 00
 Quoting: xenophon


Giants. chuckle

I think we might be giants. It just requires different energies on the planet to support such a form.


 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Yes, bring back GIANTS! They could clean the planet nicely

giantvenuswoman
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
46 & 2 is talking about giants in a way.


Phi <3
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
I made the mistake of watching the tv the other day.

I knew it was a mistake, but I couldn't help myself.

It was a show called how the universe works, and it was a lot like I expected it would be.

Terrible.

They had some phd talking head on that would talk on a subject. Then they would switch to another one, and they would say the exact same thing. Then they would show some animation of what they were talking about, followed by another talking head saying the exact same thing.

None of them could see they were all told the same thing, and were simply repeating what they were told. None of them had anything new to share. None of them knew how the universe worked.

Nothing like a little tv to piss you off enough into writing a thread about the sun.

Actually what I want to explore is binary systems, and the idea that our sun does have a twin. That maybe it's always been there, but the talking heads have been looking in the wrong place for it.

Maybe I will even explore the idea of a dark sun.

I need to think about it some, and I won't have time to write it till this weekend.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Binary with Sirius?

[link to magneticnature.wordpress.com (secure)]
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
 Quoting: xenophon


I do like the idea. I might explore it some.

Trouble with that is Sirius is already a triple system.

I think our twin must be closer.

The show I watched did talk about the future of Cygnus some.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
 Quoting: xenophon


I do like the idea. I might explore it some.

Trouble with that is Sirius is already a triple system.

I think our twin must be closer.

The show I watched did talk about the future of Cygnus some.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Do you think the orbit displayed in that link is legit? He's right about blue/red

Would be good if we could monitor the magnetic connection between them, distance wouldn't matter as much. It is fairly close as far as stars go

Are there any other candidates?

Cygnus has been getting a bit of attention lately. I wonder if they'll ever define/classify Cygnus x3, think it needs a new word. Am hoping the Nova occurs ahead of predictions

Planet x? Iron oxide has been spotted in the skies in recent times

Last Edited by xenophon on 02/15/2019 03:57 AM
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
 Quoting: xenophon


I do like the idea. I might explore it some.

Trouble with that is Sirius is already a triple system.

I think our twin must be closer.

The show I watched did talk about the future of Cygnus some.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


Do you think the orbit displayed in that link is legit? He's right about blue/red

Would be good if we could monitor the magnetic connection between them, distance wouldn't matter as much. It is fairly close as far as stars go

Are there any other candidates?

Cygnus has been getting a bit of attention lately. I wonder if they'll ever define/classify Cygnus x3, think it needs a new word. Am hoping the Nova occurs ahead of predictions

Planet x? Iron oxide has been spotted in the skies in recent times
 Quoting: xenophon


The magnetic connection between them is the main thing I want to talk about.

My main issue with the show they watched is they didn't take into account the electromagnetic force.

They said they scanned the area past pluto, and didn't see any stars that could be our binary twin.

But planets in orbit around a star are bound by different rules than stars orbiting each other. The magnetic poles on stars should align. We do see this alignment between stars and black holes, proving a interspatial current runs between them. In this case you wouldn't find a binary star twin in orbit around the other stars accretion disk. You would find it around the poles.

Which brings me to my main point.

Why do the poles flip on the sun every 11 years?

I don't think there is an answer. Just that it happens.

There could be galactic influence, but I tend to think that moderates the longer scale cycles like a mini ice age.

But two huge magnetic fields interacting within an orbit would have this effect. Or maybe even our sun is the lower mass object that makes one full orbit around our twin every 22 years.

It's entirely possible we live inside of a black hole's influence, and we wouldn't really know it. Our only perception is what we have observed from the perspective of our small planet.

Here is the main trouble I have with talking head shows like "How the universe works". A bunch of people saying the same thing, making a claim to authority that they KNOW how the universe works only keeps people from thinking for themselves. So what happens when these so called experts can't have an open mind to think outside the box they were taught?

Maybe that's why science fiction leads to scientific research that later confirms/invents something someone more creative thought of.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Bizarre black hole alignments over billions of light-years
[link to earthsky.org (secure)]
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Bizarre black hole alignments over billions of light-years
[link to earthsky.org (secure)]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


The first odd thing we noticed was that some of the quasars’ rotation axes were aligned with each other — despite the fact that these quasars are separated by billions of light-years.

The team then went further and looked to see if the rotation axes were linked, not just to each other, but also to the structure of the universe on large scales at that time. And, indeed, they were. The results indicate that the rotation axes of the quasars tend to be parallel to the large-scale structures in which they find themselves.

The researchers estimate that the probability that these alignments are simply the result of chance is less than 1%.

Note that the team could not see the rotation axes or the jets of the quasars directly. Instead, they measured the polarization of the light from each quasar and, for 19 of them, found a significantly polarized signal. The direction of this polarization, combined with other information, was used to deduce the angle of the black hole disk and hence the direction of the spin axis of the quasar. Dominique Sluse of the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie in Bonn, Germany and University of Liège said:

The alignments in the new data, on scales even bigger than current predictions from simulations, may be a hint that there is a missing ingredient in our current models of the cosmos.

Spock

My favourite black hole system, Cygnus x1
Cygnus x1
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Sorry to be late can we start over??
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Bizarre black hole alignments over billions of light-years
[link to earthsky.org (secure)]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


The first odd thing we noticed was that some of the quasars’ rotation axes were aligned with each other — despite the fact that these quasars are separated by billions of light-years.

The team then went further and looked to see if the rotation axes were linked, not just to each other, but also to the structure of the universe on large scales at that time. And, indeed, they were. The results indicate that the rotation axes of the quasars tend to be parallel to the large-scale structures in which they find themselves.

The researchers estimate that the probability that these alignments are simply the result of chance is less than 1%.

Note that the team could not see the rotation axes or the jets of the quasars directly. Instead, they measured the polarization of the light from each quasar and, for 19 of them, found a significantly polarized signal. The direction of this polarization, combined with other information, was used to deduce the angle of the black hole disk and hence the direction of the spin axis of the quasar. Dominique Sluse of the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie in Bonn, Germany and University of Liège said:

The alignments in the new data, on scales even bigger than current predictions from simulations, may be a hint that there is a missing ingredient in our current models of the cosmos.

Spock

My favourite black hole system, Cygnus x1
Cygnus x1
 Quoting: xenophon


Two Stars Won’t Collide Into a Red Nova in 2022 After All
[link to blogs.discovermagazine.com]
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Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Sorry to be late can we start over??

 Quoting: Wayfaring Stranger


The countdown doesn't wait.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Bizarre black hole alignments over billions of light-years
[link to earthsky.org (secure)]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


The first odd thing we noticed was that some of the quasars’ rotation axes were aligned with each other — despite the fact that these quasars are separated by billions of light-years.

The team then went further and looked to see if the rotation axes were linked, not just to each other, but also to the structure of the universe on large scales at that time. And, indeed, they were. The results indicate that the rotation axes of the quasars tend to be parallel to the large-scale structures in which they find themselves.

The researchers estimate that the probability that these alignments are simply the result of chance is less than 1%.

Note that the team could not see the rotation axes or the jets of the quasars directly. Instead, they measured the polarization of the light from each quasar and, for 19 of them, found a significantly polarized signal. The direction of this polarization, combined with other information, was used to deduce the angle of the black hole disk and hence the direction of the spin axis of the quasar. Dominique Sluse of the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie in Bonn, Germany and University of Liège said:

The alignments in the new data, on scales even bigger than current predictions from simulations, may be a hint that there is a missing ingredient in our current models of the cosmos.

Spock

My favourite black hole system, Cygnus x1
Cygnus x1
 Quoting: xenophon


Two Stars Won’t Collide Into a Red Nova in 2022 After All
[link to blogs.discovermagazine.com]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


*jumps off the merry-go-round*
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
Bizarre black hole alignments over billions of light-years
[link to earthsky.org (secure)]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


The first odd thing we noticed was that some of the quasars’ rotation axes were aligned with each other — despite the fact that these quasars are separated by billions of light-years.

The team then went further and looked to see if the rotation axes were linked, not just to each other, but also to the structure of the universe on large scales at that time. And, indeed, they were. The results indicate that the rotation axes of the quasars tend to be parallel to the large-scale structures in which they find themselves.

The researchers estimate that the probability that these alignments are simply the result of chance is less than 1%.

Note that the team could not see the rotation axes or the jets of the quasars directly. Instead, they measured the polarization of the light from each quasar and, for 19 of them, found a significantly polarized signal. The direction of this polarization, combined with other information, was used to deduce the angle of the black hole disk and hence the direction of the spin axis of the quasar. Dominique Sluse of the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie in Bonn, Germany and University of Liège said:

The alignments in the new data, on scales even bigger than current predictions from simulations, may be a hint that there is a missing ingredient in our current models of the cosmos.

Spock

My favourite black hole system, Cygnus x1
Cygnus x1
 Quoting: xenophon


Two Stars Won’t Collide Into a Red Nova in 2022 After All
[link to blogs.discovermagazine.com]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


*jumps off the merry-go-round*
 Quoting: xenophon


It's still worth watching.
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
...


The first odd thing we noticed was that some of the quasars’ rotation axes were aligned with each other — despite the fact that these quasars are separated by billions of light-years.

The team then went further and looked to see if the rotation axes were linked, not just to each other, but also to the structure of the universe on large scales at that time. And, indeed, they were. The results indicate that the rotation axes of the quasars tend to be parallel to the large-scale structures in which they find themselves.

The researchers estimate that the probability that these alignments are simply the result of chance is less than 1%.

Note that the team could not see the rotation axes or the jets of the quasars directly. Instead, they measured the polarization of the light from each quasar and, for 19 of them, found a significantly polarized signal. The direction of this polarization, combined with other information, was used to deduce the angle of the black hole disk and hence the direction of the spin axis of the quasar. Dominique Sluse of the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie in Bonn, Germany and University of Liège said:

The alignments in the new data, on scales even bigger than current predictions from simulations, may be a hint that there is a missing ingredient in our current models of the cosmos.

Spock

My favourite black hole system, Cygnus x1
Cygnus x1
 Quoting: xenophon


Two Stars Won’t Collide Into a Red Nova in 2022 After All
[link to blogs.discovermagazine.com]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


*jumps off the merry-go-round*
 Quoting: xenophon


It's still worth watching.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


If it's visible in the sky we'll know for sure. Hard to imagine how a typo could have led to this

putin
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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02/17/2019 12:09 PM

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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
...


Two Stars Won’t Collide Into a Red Nova in 2022 After All
[link to blogs.discovermagazine.com]
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


*jumps off the merry-go-round*
 Quoting: xenophon


It's still worth watching.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


If it's visible in the sky we'll know for sure. Hard to imagine how a typo could have led to this

putin
 Quoting: xenophon


It's still one of the most energetic neighbors we have.

Can't say much to their red nova prediction, but Cygnus will continue to send high energy levels our way for centuries.
Phi <3
sun
xenophon

User ID: 75188892
Australia
02/17/2019 11:33 PM
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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown
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*jumps off the merry-go-round*
 Quoting: xenophon


It's still worth watching.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


If it's visible in the sky we'll know for sure. Hard to imagine how a typo could have led to this

putin
 Quoting: xenophon


It's still one of the most energetic neighbors we have.

Can't say much to their red nova prediction, but Cygnus will continue to send high energy levels our way for centuries.
 Quoting: Zer0Phi


cheers
Zer0Phi  (OP)
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02/22/2019 03:28 PM

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Re: Everybody Loves a Final Countdown



Phi <3
sun