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The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry

 
JADR+
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01/24/2019 12:34 AM
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The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
[link to phys.org (secure)]

"Radioactive decay rates, thought to be unique physical constants and counted on in such fields as medicine and anthropology, may be more variable than once thought.


A team of scientists from Purdue and Stanford universities has found that the decay of radioactive isotopes fluctuates in synch with the rotation of the sun's core.

The fluctuations appear to be very small but could lead to predictive tools for solar flares and may have an impact on medical radiation treatments.

This adds to evidence of swings in decay rates in response to solar activity and the distance between the Earth and the sun that Purdue researchers Ephraim Fischbach, a professor of physics, and Jere Jenkins, a nuclear engineer, have been gathering for the last four years. The Purdue team previously reported observing a drop in the rate of decay that began a day and half before and peaked during the December 2006 solar flare and an annual fluctuation that appeared to be based on the Earth's orbit of, and changing distance from, the sun, Jenkins said."
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JADR+  (OP)

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01/24/2019 12:40 AM
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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
"it is estimated that about 60 billion solar neutrinos pass through a person's fingernail every second, but they are so weakly reactive that they pass right through the body without disturbing or changing anything, Jenkins said.

"We haven't known the solar neutrino to interact significantly with anything, but it fits with the evidence we've gathered as the likely source of these fluctuations," he said. "So, what we're suggesting is that something that can't interact with anything is changing something that can't be changed."


Last Edited by JADR+ on 01/24/2019 12:40 AM
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legionaire49

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01/24/2019 04:54 AM
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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry

Alasdair Wilkins
8/23/10 6:10pmFiled to: MAD SCIENCE
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The Sun is changing the supposedly constant rates of decay of radioactive elements, and we have absolutely no idea why. But an entirely unknown particle could be behind it. Plus, this discovery could help us predict deadly solar flares.

It's one of the most basic concepts in all of chemistry: Radioactive elements decay at a constant rate. If that weren't the case, carbon-14 dating wouldn't tell us anything reliable about the age of archaeological materials, and every chemotherapy treatment would be a gamble. It's such a fundamental assumption that scientists don't even bother testing it anymore. That's why researchers had to stumble upon this discovery in the most unlikely of ways.

A team at Purdue University needed to generate a string of random numbers, a surprisingly tricky task that is complicated by the fact that whatever method you use to generate the numbers will have some influence on them. Physics professor Ephraim Fischbach decided to use the decay of radioactive isotopes as a source of randomness. Although the overall decay is a known constant, the individual atoms would decay in unpredictable ways, providing a random pattern.
legionaire49
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01/24/2019 05:38 AM

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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry

Alasdair Wilkins
8/23/10 6:10pmFiled to: MAD SCIENCE
51.2K
96
Save

The Sun is changing the supposedly constant rates of decay of radioactive elements, and we have absolutely no idea why. But an entirely unknown particle could be behind it. Plus, this discovery could help us predict deadly solar flares.

It's one of the most basic concepts in all of chemistry: Radioactive elements decay at a constant rate. If that weren't the case, carbon-14 dating wouldn't tell us anything reliable about the age of archaeological materials, and every chemotherapy treatment would be a gamble. It's such a fundamental assumption that scientists don't even bother testing it anymore. That's why researchers had to stumble upon this discovery in the most unlikely of ways.


A team at Purdue University needed to generate a string of random numbers, a surprisingly tricky task that is complicated by the fact that whatever method you use to generate the numbers will have some influence on them. Physics professor Ephraim Fischbach decided to use the decay of radioactive isotopes as a source of randomness. Although the overall decay is a known constant, the individual atoms would decay in unpredictable ways, providing a random pattern.
 Quoting: legionaire49


Another blow for carbon dating and chemo

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hankie

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01/24/2019 05:53 AM

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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
Well of course, the sun has always decayed this fast when you leave it in hot sun, not so much in the winter time. You want to see how fast, just cut some grass put in into a container in full sun, it will turn into a slug of green looks like cow dung before it hardens. You add some dirt and you start good compost for gardening. You do not need to buy it if you can make it. It the rate of decay in live action, come one come all do your bit for science. It real fast, and then think of their experiments, you can do it to. This is way the carbon dating is off, because they measure decay of plant life etc. If it on a rock they date rocks with it, because you can not date the rock itself.

Mud can turn into hard rock with sometime, not hundreds of years either, sure does not take millions of years. Where housed had been, water flood causing mud, in the mud is drop some tools, and then the water goes away the mud hardens around the tool or whatever and then years go by, someone finds that tool and it an oddity, rock now from hardened earth are rock like. Plant life also goes into the mud, after some years it turns to coal, it a matter of where and what kind of plant life.

It also good to add for other purposes, as in turning it into building produces, just do a little rock dirt and mud lime and other things and it turns into stone. You have to have great dust as in marble or granite dust or tiny gravel, add good mud and lime, the correct mixture is by experimentation.
Sorry I got a headache

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Chaos Replicator

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01/24/2019 05:59 AM

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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
Cool! blobr
*The Fire Rises!* :bike:

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Miss Bunny Swan

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01/24/2019 06:17 AM

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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
Oh just blame the sun why don’t you
darth

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01/24/2019 06:24 AM
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Re: The Sun is changing the rate of radioactive decay, and breaking the rules of chemistry
Reminds me of a scientist I once worked with.

He was older, a Los Alamos alumni that we had hired for our SDI program.

He had a hypothesis that if he could produce a magnetic field strong enough, he could hasten radioactive decay. This could be used to produce energy while disposing of radioactive waste.

Unfortunately, he died before he could test the hypothesis.

Now, I have put it out on the web for free.

Who is qualified to test this and profit from it?