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The 2006 Origins of the Lockdown Idea

 
Elegant Walnut
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05/22/2020 10:44 AM

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The 2006 Origins of the Lockdown Idea
Guest Jeffrey Tucker, editorial director of the American Institute for Economic Research explains the idea of a lockdown to control infectious disease was not an idea developed by epidemiologists.

The idea was a collaboration by a computer scientist and his 14-year-old daughter for a school science paper.




Start at about 5:00:



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Last Edited by Elegant Walnut on 05/22/2020 04:06 PM
Elegant Walnut  (OP)

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05/22/2020 10:55 AM

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Re: The 2006 Origins of the Lockdown Idea
From the interview:

"This is a hard truth but everything we've done to ruin people's lives and ruin our thriving economy and bring about a great depression all over the world has been completely pointless. All the data is showing this."

Last Edited by Elegant Walnut on 05/22/2020 11:59 AM
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Re: The 2006 Origins of the Lockdown Idea
Guest Jeffrey Tucker, editorial director of the American Institute for Economic Research explains the idea of a lockdown to control infectious disease was not an idea developed by epidemiologists.

The ideas was a collaboration by a computer scientist and his 14-year-old daughter for a school science paper.




Start at about 5:00:



[link to omny.fm (secure)]
 Quoting: Elegant Walnut


the parasites are sick people. just a sick group of subhuman feces.
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Re: The 2006 Origins of the Lockdown Idea
the economy is ruined long ago, its capitalist logic to do that
Elegant Walnut  (OP)

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05/22/2020 12:06 PM

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Re: The 2006 Origins of the Lockdown Idea
The Untold Story of the Birth of Social Distancing

The idea has been around for centuries. But it took a high school science fair, George W. Bush, history lessons and some determined researchers to overcome skepticism and make it federal policy.



WASHINGTON — Fourteen years ago, two federal government doctors, Richard Hatchett and Carter Mecher, met with a colleague at a burger joint in suburban Washington for a final review of a proposal they knew would be treated like a piñata: telling Americans to stay home from work and school the next time the country was hit by a deadly pandemic.

When they presented their plan not long after, it was met with skepticism and a degree of ridicule by senior officials, who like others in the United States had grown accustomed to relying on the pharmaceutical industry, with its ever-growing array of new treatments, to confront evolving health challenges.

Drs. Hatchett and Mecher were proposing instead that Americans in some places might have to turn back to an approach, self-isolation, first widely employed in the Middle Ages.

How that idea — born out of a request by President George W. Bush to ensure the nation was better prepared for the next contagious disease outbreak — became the heart of the national playbook for responding to a pandemic is one of the untold stories of the coronavirus crisis...


...It was about that time that Dr. Mecher heard from Robert J. Glass, a senior scientist at Sandia in New Mexico who specialized in building advanced models to explain how complex systems work — and what can cause catastrophic failures.

Dr. Glass’s daughter Laura, then 14, had done a class project in which she built a model of social networks at her Albuquerque high school, and when Dr. Glass looked at it, he was intrigued.


[link to www.nytimes.com (secure)]





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