Godlike Productions - Discussion Forum
Users Online Now: 1,889 (Who's On?)Visitors Today: 51,057
Pageviews Today: 146,422Threads Today: 75Posts Today: 1,289
01:32 AM


Rate this Thread

Absolute BS Crap Reasonable Nice Amazing
 

LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo

 
CHI RHO
Offer Upgrade

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 10:48 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo

Much has been said about the larger plutonium-containing fuel cylinders on NASA’s Galileo (and Cassini) mission, the main RHU’s inside the RTG’s, but little has been said about the LWRHU’s, of which there were 120 on Galileo, and are 117 to 137 (accounts vary) on Cassini. Each of these little heaters carries a piece of plutonium the size of a standard pencil eraser head, about .006 pounds. It is interesting to study the path that these pieces take into the planets during a plunge also, because they are even more insulated and protected than the larger 1/3 pound cylinders. Also since they have a smaller weight they will take a significantly different path than the larger ones and therefore would not be expended in a critical blast from one of the main cylinders. If we assume that the O. Meeckers Jupiter mystery spot image from Oct. 19 was indeed the blast from a nuclear event of the larger cylinders going critical, then we must look at a situation where the smaller ones will go critical at a much later time and in a different area entirely. In addition to that fact, the smaller pellets, by the time they reach critical will be entirely dispersed from each other over 1000’s of miles, so each one will have its own opportunity to fizzle (the large majority) or go critical with a bang (the small minority if any). Estimating that only a small fraction will stay intact to the point that .006 (or less) pounds could go critical in the depths of Jupiter or Saturn, let’s assume for our argument that 5 or 10 (or pieces thereof) will have a chance, each in an entirely different point inside the planet. Let’s analyze a long-term journey of one of these eraser-sized pellets:

There are 6 layers of protection tightly surrounding one of these pellets, ½” aero-heat shield, 7/16” total of graphite-carbon insulators (4 insulators = 7/16” total), and .04” thick Rhodium-Platinum alloy. Inside sits the Pu-Oxide (Pu-238/239 plus a small amount of Oxygen) of .006 pounds.

Assume many of the pellet pods (carbon and metals minus the heat shield, originally about 1” diameter by 1.3” length), survived entry and are still valid at around 4000 miles into Jupiter where the pressures and temperatures are such that the surrounding .04” of rhodium-platinum and Pu inside turn to a liquid state as the graphite carbon layers turn to a hard pre-diamond, while the entire pellet pod is compressed to a smaller diameter. Around 5000 miles in, the carbon insulators have turned to a hollow diamond that surrounds the liquid mix described above. Around 7000 miles in the pod, highly compressed and much smaller now, has turned to a semi-liquid diamond surrounding a liquid center. Eventually the entire contents are likely mixed together as a dense liquid sphere of half the original diameter with each element maintaining a significant homogeneity (not mixing completely). If this pod somehow stays intact as this liquid sphere to the depth of 25,000 miles into Jupiter without dispersing it will turn back into a solid “impure post-liquid diamond”, simply because the pressures are so immense, the liquid state can no longer be held.

Portions of a Pu pellet surviving at any one of the depths listed above could arguably reach critical, even though very small in amount, simply because the pressures change the dynamics of what is critical mass at this depth. The wild cards are “What kind of mix survives this depth intact?” and, even with multiple breakups of the original units, “Will much smaller pieces find a way to stay intact falling ever-deeper until the outside density nears that of the mix?” Jupiter’s average density is 1.3 grams/cubic centimeter (Saturn’s avg. is .7). That occurs about 1/3 of the way into the planet. The conglomerate as a whole has a density much greater than that especially after being compressed, at least 7 grams/cubic centimeter. Add to this the motion of the shifting heavy liquid gases of Jupiter and gravity downwards to the center, the result is a very slow continued fall for any intact portion, any portion that can maintain any integrity at all. Only a complete breakdown and liquid dissolution of the initial fuel pod will stop its progress downward.

All of this is extremely speculative, and it is tremendously difficult to estimate the time it would take for various small pieces of this conglomerate to reach critical levels deep within Jupiter. It was estimated that the larger cylinders reached a depth of only 700 miles before reaching critical and fissioning. The smaller units we are talking about start out 50 times less in Pu mass, and about 7 times less in mass when including the graphite and metal elements minus the heat shield of both types of cylinders. This means a slower fall for the small ones, and a much longer wait for critical. This may be the reason that NASA it still counting down the time from the Galileo plunge even to the nearest second as of today, 8/9/2007 (the day I first wrote this). One critical fission implosion ignition of a very small amount of plutonium very deep into Jupiter can create temperatures of several 100’s of millions of degrees, overkill for fusion temperature thresholds. One relatively tiny superheat spark such as this could have tremendous significance in the bowels of Jupiter.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 10:50 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
[link to www2.jpl.nasa.gov]

NASA still counting down the time from impact of Galileo into Jupiter. Why?
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:02 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
[link to www.cyberspaceorbit.com]

As far as the "mystery spot" seen at the Galileo plunge area on Oct. 19, 27 days after the Sept. 21 plunge, this was predicted in my report above from July of 2003.

Quoting:
'2) Would Jupiter be able to keep a fusion reaction going? If so, how long?

It may be that a fusion reaction is not possible because the proper hydrogen isotopes won’t be plentiful enough or conditions will be too chaotic or the fission reaction can’t be sustained long enough. I would assume that subsequent fusion reactions could be kept going indefinitely, if conditions are right, or there may be one small explosion that fizzles out shortly thereafter, much like a small comet event. Since we don’t know everything about Jupiter’s makeup or the possible reactions of the elements, something completely unexpected may happen. I am still asking questions and getting a wide variety of responses from physicists. I phrase the question like this: "Theoretically, what would happen to a lake of dense liquid hydrogen and helium if a fission bomb were detonated inside it, assuming no other significant elements were present above, below, or in the lake?" Often, I get the response, "That sounds similar to a hydrogen fusion bomb." They usually backtrack when I tell them my true question, because, admittedly, the situation is more complex than that. "What is the amount of Deuterium?...Tritium?... What is the pressure? How controlled is the situation?"… '
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:06 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
"...there may be one small explosion that fizzles out shortly thereafter..."

This is what happened to the larger 1/3 pound Pu cylinders and is likely why we saw the "mystery spot" there.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:08 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
[link to www.space.com]

Mystery spot article above. Note, they even hint "foreign object", likely not meteor since they don't hit at the equator of Jupiter.
Xare

User ID: 334282
United States
12/11/2007 11:10 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Iam about to watch "Quiet Earth" for the first time.

Its about a Post Apocalyptic Earth after what they call "Project Flashlight" goes bad.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:15 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Quote from Space.com:

"It is not known if the spot is purely an atmospheric phenomenon or if it might have been generated by some foreign object, though the latter possibility is doubted."
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:18 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
In summary you have the large RTG plutonium pieces and the smaller LWRHU pieces. The latter must have taken a different plunge path than the former, therefore we have not ruled out the possibility that a different event can occur from these smaller pieces, events that we may have missed or are yet to come.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:18 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Iam about to watch "Quiet Earth" for the first time.

Its about a Post Apocalyptic Earth after what they call "Project Flashlight" goes bad.
 Quoting: Xare



I'll see if I can rent that one.
LouisWinthorpeIII

User ID: 338089
United States
12/11/2007 11:20 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Are you nuts?

Do you really think it will do *ANYTHING*? How many nukes did we drop on EARTH, and we didn't ignite our atmosphere.

Look at the massive electrical storms between Jupiter & Io.

No ignition there!


Look I know 2010 was a great book, but it's not going to happen.

Sorry.

And any 'nuke' we have isn't going to do squat.
"I don't know which was scarier...the speech...or the Congress cheering it. He evoked Lincoln. Whenever a President is going to get us into serious trouble...they always use Lincoln."
-2010
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:23 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Are you nuts?

Do you really think it will do *ANYTHING*? How many nukes did we drop on EARTH, and we didn't ignite our atmosphere.

Look at the massive electrical storms between Jupiter & Io.

No ignition there!


Look I know 2010 was a great book, but it's not going to happen.

Sorry.

And any 'nuke' we have isn't going to do squat.
 Quoting: LouisWinthorpeIII


You don't have a clue on this. Research my reports thoroughly and then we can talk. My first is listed above, my second is here below.

[link to www.rinf.com]
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/11/2007 11:24 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
signing off for tonight...
Starseeder

User ID: 322788
Canada
12/11/2007 11:24 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
The question is : why so much efforts and money put into this scheme ?
Simplicity is the key to Heaven...more than ever.

Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. (Mat 18:3)
Bon Jovi
User ID: 338900
United States
12/11/2007 11:47 PM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
The Lucifer Project is dumb and not real. It makes no sense to do that. They are just gonna kill everyone from a 2nd sun they fly away to another earth like planet. Nuking the planet would be easier and faster and then they can still leave.
The Lucifer project is fake crap. Their plan for taking over the planet by a NWO seems to be working fine.
The Commentator

User ID: 155573
United States
12/12/2007 01:27 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag bsflag
non sufficit Orbis

Being a zetatard means never having to make sense.

"Nancy pays me to post on Her threads"

Free Store admits to being a paid zetadrool shill

NO max/bridget EVER!!!!!
NO luser EVER!!!
NO clunker EVER!!!!!
Halcyon Dayz

User ID: 337024
Netherlands
12/12/2007 07:03 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Recycled bunk.

Give me some good fresh woo.
book
[link to www.badastronomy.com]
Reaching for the sky makes you taller.

Hi! My name is Halcyon Dayz and I'm addicted to morans.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 304329
United Kingdom
12/12/2007 07:20 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Stars are not a fusion furnace.. fusion only occurs on the surface where electrical currents from the cosmos come down on it (Z-pinch effect).

You could detonate all the nukes in the world upon saturn, and it would still not turn saturn into a star.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/12/2007 07:50 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
[link to www.bibliotecapleyades.net]

Dr. Salla's comments on this.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/12/2007 07:53 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Thread: Saturn's path from Aug '07 to Aug '08, also Galileo end, Cassini projected end, and Star of Bethlehem location

More information above not included in my reports, namely, the location of events seems to be the 2 BC Star of Bethlehem location.

Also note that that the original Plutonium mix was discovered to be 15% Pu-239 to start with, which is a much more fissionable mix than previously assumed.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 304329
United Kingdom
12/12/2007 07:57 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
It will not happen for another reason also.. we are not the only intelligent life. If you think higher intelligence is just going to let us nuke another planet in the hopes of turning it into a star, you are sadly mistaken.
CHI RHO  (OP)

User ID: 336464
United States
12/12/2007 08:00 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
When you start with one prediction like Cooper's suggestion about Galileo, it's not that evident, but after several significant factual observations align, the odds begin to favor a planned event.

1)A.C. Clarke makes "2010", Jupiter becomes a star called Lucifer in the movie inspiring a one-world unity on earth.(1984) Saturn originally envisioned, but changed to Jupiter for the movie.

2)Cooper predicts Galileo plunge and NASA's secret plan to try to create a star. (1990)

3)Plutonium-238/239 mix that Galileo (and Cassini) carries turns out to be FISSILE (capable of a sustained nuclear reaction). (2002) (later mix found to be 15% Pu-239 also)

4)J.C. Goliathan predicts "Nuclear reaction possible on Jupiter from Galileo". (2003)

5)NASA does Galileo plunge. (Sept 21, 2003)

6)Plunge happens to be a same site as Star of Bethlehem, and near same month and day as the accepted recalculated "birth of christ" which is Sept. 11, 3 BC.

7)"Mystery Spot" the size of earth occurs on Jupiter where exit wound would be likely from an explosion from Galileo's Plutonium, based on Galileo drop spot. (Oct. 19, 2003)!

8)Cassini plunge similar to Galileo is implied for June of 2008 (2007)

9)Saturn from late 2007 to mid 2008 is looping in the same "Star of Bethlehem" area. (Beth. Star, Galileo in Jupiter, Cassini in Saturn - all same area). Location is also the "Lion's Paw of LEO" which has much significance in the Masonic Hiram Abiff story and the Sphinx of Giza.
LaZe

User ID: 314849
Australia
12/12/2007 08:03 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
It will not happen for another reason also.. we are not the only intelligent life. If you think higher intelligence is just going to let us nuke another planet in the hopes of turning it into a star, you are sadly mistaken.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 304329


we are not talking about a solid planet here. we are talking about igniteing a gas planet.
It's time for us to fight back against these socialist scumbags
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 203352
United States
12/12/2007 08:57 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
bump
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 194596
United States
12/12/2007 09:18 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Plenty of suspicion has been raised, previous predictions have actually occurred to give this theory legs I'm afraid.
Halcyon Dayz

User ID: 337024
Netherlands
12/12/2007 09:27 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Plenty of suspicion has been raised, previous predictions have actually occurred to give this theory legs I'm afraid.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 194596

???

Previous predictions were wrong.
And what 'theory'? Its gobbledygook.
book
Reaching for the sky makes you taller.

Hi! My name is Halcyon Dayz and I'm addicted to morans.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 247684
United States
12/12/2007 09:37 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Prediction 1: Galileo would be sent in to Jupiter

This was a wild prediction at the time but came to pass.


Prediction 2: A reaction will occur, they don't know if it will work.

"Mystery spot" developed where plunge occurred.


Prediction 3: Masonic symbology will be found.

It's all over the place and still appearing.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 247684
United States
12/12/2007 09:39 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Prediction #4: Pu-238 will turn out to be fissile.

It was proven and even admitted by the "bad astronomy" website.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 304329
United Kingdom
12/12/2007 09:56 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
It will not happen for another reason also.. we are not the only intelligent life. If you think higher intelligence is just going to let us nuke another planet in the hopes of turning it into a star, you are sadly mistaken.


we are not talking about a solid planet here. we are talking about igniteing a gas planet.
 Quoting: LaZe


yeh, and it ain't gonna work.. not quite as simple as setting it on fire with nuclear weapons..
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 194596
United States
12/12/2007 09:58 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
It will not happen for another reason also.. we are not the only intelligent life. If you think higher intelligence is just going to let us nuke another planet in the hopes of turning it into a star, you are sadly mistaken.


we are not talking about a solid planet here. we are talking about igniteing a gas planet.


yeh, and it ain't gonna work.. not quite as simple as setting it on fire with nuclear weapons..
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 304329



Yet you are ignoring evidence that it has partially succeeded already. You discount the "mystery spot". Need I repeat that this occurred in the spot that it should have according to the wind and pressure dynamics on Jupiter and the plunge location of Galileo!?
Halcyon Dayz

User ID: 337024
Netherlands
12/12/2007 10:28 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Prediction 1: Galileo would be sent in to Jupiter
This was a wild prediction at the time but came to pass.

Do you know that such a project takes more then a decade to plan and develop?
And it took the spacecraft 6 years to get there.

Prediction 2: A reaction will occur, they don't know if it will work.
"Mystery spot" developed where plunge occurred
.
A thousand miles off. Jupiter is big.
Black spots were seen before, and since.

Prediction 3: Masonic symbology will be found.
It's all over the place and still appearing.

You mean there are masons in space?

Prediction #4: Pu-238 will turn out to be fissile.
It was proven and even admitted by the "bad astronomy" website.

Maybe you should read it.
What do you mean will turn out.
It always was. But nobody ever used it in a bomb.
RTGs aren't bombs. There isn't a critical mass in any of the compartments. And spaceships burn up in the atmosphere at those speeds.
book
And the craziest notion is that you can 'lit' a planet.

The smallest brown dwarf that has fusion, and only deuterium fusion, needs to be at least 13 time more massive then Jupiter.

Fool you once...
Reaching for the sky makes you taller.

Hi! My name is Halcyon Dayz and I'm addicted to morans.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 203352
United States
12/12/2007 10:34 AM
Report Abusive Post
Report Copyright Violation
Re: LUCIFER PROJECT - 1st attempt at Jupiter - Analyzing what happened to the LWRHU’s of Galileo
Prediction 1: Galileo would be sent in to Jupiter
This was a wild prediction at the time but came to pass.

Do you know that such project take more then a decade to plan and develop?
And it took 6 years to get there.

Prediction 2: A reaction will occur, they don't know if it will work.
"Mystery spot" developed where plunge occurred
.
A thousand miles off. Jupiter is big.
Black spots were seen before, and since.

Prediction 3: Masonic symbology will be found.
It's all over the place and still appearing.

You mean there are masons in space?

Prediction #4: Pu-238 will turn out to be fissile.
It was proven and even admitted by the "bad astronomy" website.

Maybe you should read it.
What do you mean will turn out.
It always was. But nobody ever used it in a bomb.
RTGs aren't bombs. There isn't a critical mass in any of the compartments. And spaceships burn up in the atmosphere at those speeds.
book
And the craziest notion is that you can 'lit' a planet.

The smallest brown dwarf that has fusion, and only deuterium fusion, needs to be at least 13 time more massive then Jupiter.

Fool you once...
 Quoting: Halcyon Dayz


Your refutations don't even make sense, and your grammar and spelling are poor. Sorry, you are not worthy of a debate.





GLP