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QANTAS AIRLINES QF30 'BOMBING' SUPPRESSED?

 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 462335
United States
07/26/2008 06:51 PM
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QANTAS AIRLINES QF30 'BOMBING' SUPPRESSED?
In the month leading up to the bombing, Qantas was targeted. LAX reported a bomb threat that was later deemed a hoax, but was it really? The secrecy has all ready set in and the cover up is well on its way, but the controversy will not go quietly.



-Local bomb probers decry denial of access to Qantas plane-

MANILA, Philippines -- Raising issues of sovereignty and jurisdiction, local bomb experts protested on Saturday what they said were strict restrictions imposed on them in their attempt to investigate the cause of the explosion that ripped a hole in a Qantas flight forced to land in Manila on Friday.

In a talk with the Inquirer, the experts said Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) assistant general manager and security chief Angel Atutubo prevented them from conducting an investigation into the Qantas Boeing 747 that made an emergency landing in Manila.

On the other hand, the experts said Australian authorities and even a team from the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) were allowed to have a look at the plane.

“We were prevented by General Atutubo to get close to the plane even if it is on Philippine soil. It’s an issue of sovereignty. He (Atutubo) gave us a hard time,” said a bomb expert who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of possible reprisals.

The officer said that if the plane had biohazard materials, local officials would be hard-pressed to quell any outbreak.

“Who would answer for that if something like Anthrax spreads? Can General Atutubo answer for that? Do we still have to ask permission for something as lethal as that?” he said.

Nonetheless, the lack of access, the sources said, had other foreign experts worried. “There should have been an advice given to Atutubo on the protocol until at least the source of the explosion was identified.”

Because of the lack of access to the plane, investigators were only able to give a theory on the cause of the explosion.

“It looked like there was some weakness in the metal rivets and structure aggravated by whatever chemicals were in the baggage section. But we cannot be absolutely sure,” the investigator said.

Another veteran bomb expert recalled that when a Philippine Airlines flight exploded in Japan in 1994, bomb investigators were allowed to inspect the plane by Japanese authorities.

“We asked the permission of Japanese authorities and they agreed. What is wrong if the same access, in the name of courtesy at least, was given to us in the Qantas flight?” he asked.

The bombing turned out to be a test mission of terrorists Ramzi Yousef who had established a terrorist cell in the country and had planned to launch a series of bombing attacks on international flights flying out of Manila. The operation, codenamed Operation Bojinka, was widely seen as the template for the September 11, 2001 attack on World Trade Center in the United States.

“Remember that flight (Friday’s Qantas flight) came from London and there were bombings there in July 7, 2005. So access should have been given in the name of international cooperation against terrorism,” he said.

The Qantas flight from London was on its way to Melbourne after a stop in Hong Kong when it made an emergency landing at the NAIA. Passengers recalled hearing an explosion with the plane descending rapidly afterward. No one was reported hurt in the incident.
[link to newsinfo.inquirer.net]
anonymous australian
User ID: 473925
Australia
07/26/2008 07:12 PM
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Re: QANTAS AIRLINES QF30 'BOMBING' SUPPRESSED?
that's really intesting. haven't heard any of that on the aussie news.
and apparently the oxygen masks didn't work and some kids on the flight were turning blue.
everyone on board thought they were gonna die.
It was a miracle they landed at all, never mind with no injuries.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 473915
Australia
07/26/2008 07:19 PM
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Re: QANTAS AIRLINES QF30 'BOMBING' SUPPRESSED?
MANILA, Philippines -- Raising issues of sovereignty and jurisdiction, local bomb experts protested on Saturday what they said were strict restrictions imposed on them in their attempt to investigate the cause of the explosion that ripped a hole in a Qantas flight forced to land in Manila on Friday.


 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 462335


Heh, if this was CIA they would already have a story/scapegoat etc. Because it's not, they don't already have an agenda in place, hence the cover up.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 473812
United Kingdom
07/26/2008 07:28 PM
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Re: QANTAS AIRLINES QF30 'BOMBING' SUPPRESSED?
I heard from a "reliable source" that it was in fact a baby kangaroo which escaped by kicking a hole in the side of the jet.


Other sources then say that the crate containing said marsupial landed in a residential area with such force as to split it open, allowing the animal egress from its airborne container. The joey was later recaptured by Sidney Zoo staff but not before it had frightened several local cats who thought it was a freakishly large mouse.


Apparently a short film of these facts was made but the makers of the crate used, one Acme corporation were not available for comment.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
User ID: 462335
United States
07/26/2008 07:47 PM
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Re: QANTAS AIRLINES QF30 'BOMBING' SUPPRESSED?
(CNN) -- The Australian air safety agency is investigating Saturday the emergency landing of a Qantas Boeing 747 in the Philippines after a hole in the fuselage made the plane lose cabin pressure.

Officials from two U.S. transportation agencies said initial findings indicate that no act of terrorism was involved.

According to early reports, a section of the fuselage separated in the forward cargo compartment, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said in a written statement.

"Our preliminary checks on this indicate that there was no corrosion anywhere near where this hole occurred in the aircraft," Geoff Dixon, Qantas' CEO, said in Sydney.

Video of the plane after it landed Friday showed a large hole where the leading edge of the wing attaches to the fuselage. Video Watch footage from the plane »

The section of the fuselage separated at about 29,000 feet, and the cabin began to rapidly decompress, the safety agency said in the statement released Friday.

The crew brought the plane down to 10,000 feet and diverted the aircraft to Manila International Airport, where it landed safely about 11:15 a.m. (11:15 p.m. ET Thursday).

The airline said it received no reports of any injuries among the 346 passengers and 19 crew members. Watch reaction of passengers to incident Video

Dixon called the incident a "hugely serious issue" and one that investigators would sort out. "We can't speculate on what happened."

Oxygen masks were deployed during the emergency. Passengers said their ears popped because of the plane's rapid descent to a lower altitude.
"There was an almighty crack," one passenger said. "We dropped a bit in the air, but other than that, it was fine."

"There was a big bang," said another. "I knew there was a hole somewhere, but I didn't know what was going on." iReport.com: See photos of the 'nasty' damage

The Boeing 747-400 flight originated in London. It had just taken off from Hong Kong for Melbourne, Australia, when it was forced to land.

A U.S. Transportation Security Administration official, who asked not to be identified because his agency is not leading the probe into the incident, said a preliminary investigation found no connection to terrorism.

The damage appears to be related to a mechanical issue, based on examination of the aircraft on the ground, the official said.

The official said a TSA representative based in Manila is assisting in the investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board also is sending investigators, and an NTSB spokesman said the agency also does not suspect terrorism
[link to edition.cnn.com]





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