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Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China

 
Just In Time For Olympics
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07/28/2008 06:50 PM
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Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Recombinomics Commentary 03:05
July 28, 2008

"China reported that approximately 20 days ago, a man suddenly died from an unidentified disease in Wanjiakou Village, Xiaoguan Town, Wendeng City, Shandong Province. His entire body turned dark purple, and he bled from his mouth, nostrils, ears, and eyes just as he died.

Shortly after the man died, 2 other men who been in contact with him, died showing the same symptoms. Villagers who had left the village to work said "3 people died 10 days ago. 6 or 7 more are being treated in the Wendeng Central Hospital. People have been to the area to investigate, but they are unable to classify the disease."

The above comments from ProMED describe a contagious hemorrhagic disease in China. There are some similarities with an outbreak that began in Sichuan province at this time in 2005. The symptoms were very similar and matched symptoms linked to the 1918 pandemic. The Sichuan outbreak had linkages to swine and was said to be linked to a common swine bacterium that had turned more virulent. However, the time and location of the earlier outbreak raised concerns of linkage to H5N1, which can cause the same symptoms.

Similarly, the current outbreak in Wendeng is on the west side of the Yellow Sea (see satellite map). North and South Korea are on the east side, where H5N1 has been suspected or confirmed.

More information on the current outbreak would be useful

[link to www.recombinomics.com]
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 06:52 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Sounds similar to eboli

Yowser! Not good.



.
OxygenX

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07/28/2008 06:54 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Ive not seen any info on H5N1 or similar strains producing those kind of symptoms.
Cheers.
-----------------------------
"Shit, if this is gonna be that kind of party, I'm going to stick my dick in the mashed potatoes."

"The gene pool is stagnant and I am the minister of chlorine"

"What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence"
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 06:58 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
I meant ebola, not eboli ~ sorry
It really seems to be more like this.

[link to en.wikipedia.org]

The Ebola virus first came to notice in 1976 in outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever in Zaire and Sudan.[2] The strain of Ebola which broke out in Zaire has one of the highest case fatality rates of any human pathogenic virus, roughly 90%. The strain which broke out later in Sudan has a mortality of approximately 50%. The virus is believed to be initially transmitted to a human via contact with an infected animal host. From the first human infected, the virus is then transmitted by human contact with infected blood and bodily fluids of a diseased person, and by human contact with contaminated medical equipment, such as needles. Both of these infectious mechanisms will occur in clinical (nosocomial) and non-clinical situations. Due to the high fatality rate, the rapidity of demise, and the often remote areas where infections occur, the potential for widespread epidemic outbreaks is considered low.
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 06:59 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
1918 spanish influenza ... research it ...
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 06:59 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Greeeeeat
Olympic athletes and staff, reporters and family go over to China, pick up some freaked out virus, fly home and spread the shit all over the country.

These Olympics are destined for DOOM!
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 07:03 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Titor right again!
Boiled Frog
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07/28/2008 07:04 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Now THIS should be pinned!
Boiled Frog
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07/28/2008 07:04 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Now THIS should be pinned!
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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07/28/2008 07:04 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
I agree!
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 07:12 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Greeeeeat
Olympic athletes and staff, reporters and family go over to China, pick up some freaked out virus, fly home and spread the shit all over the country.

These Olympics are destined for DOOM!
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 418035






Yeah wouldn't that be some sh!t??...just happens that many people from all over the world will be there at the same time.If theres a serious outbreak they will all bring a 'lil something back home with 'em.

BUT WHO THE HELL KNOWS?
dengue doom
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07/28/2008 07:19 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Certainly has the making of "The Stand" type doom. They deserve the Olympics but not because they're entirely forthcoming with statistics for the CDC.
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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07/28/2008 07:27 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Certainly has the making of "The Stand" type doom. They deserve the Olympics but not because they're entirely forthcoming with statistics for the CDC.
 Quoting: dengue doom 437387


Captain Trips?

The 1918 flu pandemic (commonly referred to as the Spanish flu) was an influenza pandemic that was first found in the United States, appeared in Sierra Leone and France, and then spread to nearly every part of the world. It was caused by an unusually severe and deadly Influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1. Many of its victims were healthy young adults, in contrast to most influenza outbreaks which predominantly affect juvenile, elderly, or otherwise weakened patients. The Spanish flu lasted from March 1918 to June 1920,[1] spreading even to the Arctic and remote Pacific islands. It is estimated that anywhere from 20 to 100 million people were killed worldwide, or the approximate equivalent of one third of the population of Europe,[2][3][4] more than double the number killed in World War I.[5] This extraordinary toll resulted from the extremely high infection rate of up to 50% and the extreme severity of the symptoms, suspected to be caused by cytokine storms.

The disease was first observed at Fort Riley, Kansas, United States, on March 4, 1918,[6] and Queens, New York, on March 11, 1918. In August 1918, a more virulent strain appeared simultaneously in Brest, France, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and in the U.S. at Boston, Massachusetts. The Allies of World War I came to call it the Spanish flu, primarily because the pandemic received greater press attention after it moved from France to Spain in November 1918. Spain was not involved in the war and had not imposed wartime censorship.[7]

Scientists have used tissue samples from frozen victims to reproduce the virus for study. Given the strain's extreme virulence there has been controversy regarding the wisdom of such research. Among the conclusions of this research is that the virus kills via a cytokine storm, which explains its unusually severe nature and the unusual age profile of its victims (the virus caused an overreaction of the body's immune system—the strong immune systems of young adults ravaged the body, while the weaker immune systems of children and middle-aged adults caused less morbidity and mortality).

One theory is that the virus strain originated at Fort Riley, Kansas, by two genetic mechanisms – genetic drift and antigenic shift – in viruses in poultry and swine which the fort bred for local consumption, but evidence from a recent reconstruction of the virus suggests that it jumped directly from birds to humans, without traveling through swine.[20] On October 5, 2005, researchers announced that the genetic sequence of the 1918 flu strain, a subtype of avian strain H1N1, had been reconstructed using historic tissue samples.[21] [22] On 18 January 2007, Kobasa et al. reported that infected monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) exhibited classic symptoms of the 1918 pandemic and died from a cytokine storm.[23]

The influenza strain was unusual in that this pandemic killed many young adults and otherwise healthy victims – typical influenzas kill mostly infants (aged 0-2 years), the elderly, and the immunocompromised. Another oddity was that this influenza outbreak was widespread in summer and fall (in the Northern Hemisphere). Typically, influenza is worse in the winter months.

People without symptoms could be stricken suddenly and within hours be too weak to walk; many died the next day. Symptoms included a blue tint to the face and coughing up blood caused by severe obstruction of the lungs. In some cases, the virus caused an uncontrollable hemorrhaging that filled the lungs, and patients drowned in their body fluids (pneumonia). In others, the flu caused frequent loss of bowel control and the victim would die from losing critical intestinal lining and blood loss.

In fast-progressing cases, mortality was primarily from pneumonia, by virus-induced consolidation. Slower-progressing cases featured secondary bacterial pneumonias, and there may have been neural involvement that led to mental disorders in a minority of cases. Some deaths resulted from malnourishment and even animal attacks in overwhelmed communities.
Enaid

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07/28/2008 07:29 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Soooo, my question is...

What are they not telling us? I trust all governments to never real the full truth. Soo, what is the whole story?
Personal responsibility - try it sometime. Quit blaming others for your bad choices. Consequences happen.

:enaid11:
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 07:30 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
This illness is what is called Sichuan Sheet by most of the Flubloggers. In 2005, it killed thousands in China but the government covered it up. It was believed to be H5N1 run amuck
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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07/28/2008 07:34 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
This illness is what is called Sichuan Sheet by most of the Flubloggers. In 2005, it killed thousands in China but the government covered it up. It was believed to be H5N1 run amuck
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 469902




Named after the region in China where H5N1 Bird Flu crossed over into all manner of animals (and humans) and killed them after an outbreak at Qinghai Lakes.

When that happened, the Chinese tried to cover it up by claiming it was "Streptococcus Suis" a (mild bacterial infection that usually does not kill) To honor their "SS" the term "Sichuan Sheet" was coined to highlight the coverup attempt. A sheet is a thin coverup that can be seen through.

Sichuan Sheet is the highly lethal post Qinghai Lakes strain of Bird Flu that is killing humans to the west and south of China.
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 07:48 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
The 1918 postWW1 Influenza Pandemic
was a pandemic because back then
there were relatively few drugs
to try to combat it.

Pandemics usually strike immediately
after a war because war is ugly and
equates with extremely high levels of stress
which in turn undermines the immune system or
compromises it.
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 07:49 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Look up Sichuan Sheet and Joe Neubarth to read about what happened in Sichuan, China
Anonymous Coward (OP)
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07/28/2008 07:58 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
The 1918 postWW1 Influenza Pandemic
was a pandemic because back then
there were relatively few drugs
to try to combat it.

Pandemics usually strike immediately
after a war because war is ugly and
equates with extremely high levels of stress
which in turn undermines the immune system or
compromises it.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 475021


There still aren't any drugs to combat Spanish Influenza.
If anything, Spanish Influenza would kill twice as many now as people have an increased ability to travel and live in larger communities.

1918 Spanish Influenza killed young healthy individuals that weren't even deployed in military operations.
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 08:03 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
The few Americans I've known who have gone to China have all come back with the worst "flu" they've ever had. Like we don't have immunity to the diseases common over there. We probably make them sick too.
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 10:47 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Definately the 1918 spanish influenza. uhoh
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 10:49 PM
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I think Duddits is from another world and he came to prepare us for....SOMETHING.
Anonymous Coward
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07/28/2008 10:52 PM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
The few Americans I've known who have gone to China have all come back with the worst "flu" they've ever had. Like we don't have immunity to the diseases common over there. We probably make them sick too.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 474766

A person BLED OUT in CHINA and you rationalize it by saying we give them diseases too? You are a sick lib.crazy
Anonymous Coward
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07/29/2008 01:19 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
The symptoms are not H5N1 or any form of influenza. The symptoms are haemorrhagic fever virus infection:

[link to www.cdc.gov]

It is likely related to bats. Investigate bat-human contact in the Shandong China vicinity to find your culprit. It is likely a filovirus and there is likely no vaccine or any cure; it is likely that it is an effective killer with high mortality, on the order of 80 to 90 percent.

WARNING: If you go to China and catch this, you will die. It is spread by blood/body-fluid contact with infected individual. If you've seen the movie "28 days later" then you've seen a haemorrhagic fever virus outbreak -- there is no easy stopping it; it usually burns itself out by killing faster than it can spread itself. But -- in this case -- perhaps not?
AQ 7
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07/29/2008 01:36 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Mods ... PLEASE PIN THIS!!!
Thank you.
ExhaleAeonVolts

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07/29/2008 01:50 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
there was a similar incident reported on GLP about 20 days ago of a woman who came back from africa and died of similar symptoms...

Similar to Ebola but not the Ebola virus.

Will try and find links to old post.
He who controls the past controls the future, and he who controls the present controls the past. -1984
Anonymous Coward
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07/29/2008 02:13 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
1: Med Microbiol Immunol. 1992;181(1):43-55.Links
Evidence for occurrence of filovirus antibodies in humans and imported monkeys: do subclinical filovirus infections occur worldwide?

Becker S, Feldmann H, Will C, Slenczka W.
Institut für Virologie, Philipps-Universität, Marburg, Federal Republic of Germany.

In the present serological study 120 monkey sera from different species originating from the Philippines, China, Uganda and undetermined sources and several groups of human sera comprising a total of 1288 specimens from people living in Germany were examined for the presence of antibodies directed against filoviruses (Marburg virus, strain Musoke/Ebola virus, subtype Zaire, strain Mayinga/Reston virus). Sera were screened using a filovirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA-positive sera were then confirmed by the indirect immunofluorescence technique, Western blot technique, and a blocking assay, and declared positive when at least one confirmation test was reactive. Altogether 43.3% of the monkey sera and 6.9% of the human sera reacted positively with at least one of the three different filovirus antigens. The blocking assays show that antibodies, detected in the sera, are directed to specific filovirus antigens and not caused by antigenic cross-reactivity with hitherto unknown agents. Data presented in this report suggest that subclinical filovirus infections may also occur in humans and in subhuman primates. They further suggest that filoviruses are not restricted to the African continent.

PMID: 1579085

--

Data above suggests it is possible that a filovirus is endemic to China but, AFAIK, it has not been typified.
Anonymous Coward
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07/29/2008 02:19 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
[link to www.ebaumsworld.com]

here we go, play along...
Anonymous Coward
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07/29/2008 02:20 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
Bird flu too...china isnt reporting it though.its going around the world after the olympics.perfect time for a bio attack too.
Anonymous Coward
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07/29/2008 03:00 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
perfect time for a bio attack too.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 473484

Maybe a perfect time for a spiritual revival. Nothing like a pestilence to remind people of their mortality and thereby create a spiritual awakening from the world matrix.
goddess isis
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07/29/2008 06:44 AM
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Re: Mystery Fatal Hemorrhagic Disease in Shandong China
bump this for

:doom:





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