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5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets

 
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10/24/2009 12:49 PM
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5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets
Underwater City Starts Yielding SecretsDivers Find Pottery, Streets, Courtyards, Tombs and Buildings
AOL News

(Oct. 22) -- Scientists have known for 40 years that a 5,000-year-old city lay obscured by water off southern Greece. But divers haven't had a chance to study the ruins until now.
A team from the University of Nottingham in England is working with the Greek government in exploring the site. So far, archaeologists and geologists have learned that Pavlopetri is about 1,000 years older than they first thought, according to the BBC.

The Bronze Age site is believed to have been submerged since 1000 B.C.
In an interview in the Guardian, Jon Henderson, associate professor of underwater archaeology at Nottingham, explained the significance of the site.
"It has remains dating from 2800 to 1200 B.C., long before the glory days of classical Greece," he said. "There are older sunken sites in the world but none can be considered to be planned towns such as this, which is why it is unique."
The city may have inspired the myth of the lost city of Atlantis, the Guardian said.
The divers have found a wealth of material on the sea floor, including pottery shards, streets, courtyards, tombs and 97,000 square feet of buildings, the Guardian reported. "But what really took us by surprise was the discovery of a possible megaron, a monumental structure with a large rectangular hall, which also suggests that the town had been used by an elite, and automatically raised the status of the settlement," Henderson said.
The site was discovered in 1967 by Nicholas Flemming, a marine scientist at the University of Southampton, the BBC said. He is a part of the new expedition team, which plans to study the city for five years and publish its research in 2014, the BBC said.
Greece's underwater antiquities department is co-directing the study. The site "is significant because as a submerged site it was never reoccupied," Elias Spondylis, an official with the agency, said in an interview with the Guardian. "As such it represents a frozen moment of the past."
For more on the team's discoveries, go to the BBC and the Guardian.
Below are two videos on the research project from the University of Nottingham. The second one has Flemming's account of his discovery of the city.








[link to news.aol.com]
zacksavage

User ID: 664371
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10/24/2009 12:51 PM
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Re: 5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets
"The city may have inspired the myth of the lost city of Atlantis, the Guardian said."

Doubtful.

Cool find OP.



Z
Free your mind,...your ass will follow.

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10/24/2009 07:17 PM
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Re: 5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets
Antikythera Mechanism Part 1: by Nature Video



In antiquity, the island of Antikythera was known as Aigila or Ogylos.[1]

Between the 4th and 1st centuries BC, it was used as a base by a group of Cilician pirates until their destruction by Pompey the Great. Their fort can still be seen atop a cliff to the NE of the island.

Antikythera is most famous for being the location of the discovery of the Antikythera wreck, from which the Antikythera Ephebe and Antikythera Mechanism were recovered. The Antihythera mechanism is an ancient mechanical calculator (sometimes described as the first mechanical computer) designed to calculate astronomical positions which has been dated to about 150-100 BC. It was discovered in an ancient shipwreck off Antikythera in 1900. Technological artifacts of similar complexity did not appear until a thousand years later.

Antikythera is also a very important stop-over site for migratory birds during their seasonal movements, due to its geographical position and certain features (a longitudinal island, with a north-south direction and very low human activities)[2]. Furthermore the island hosts the largest breeding colony of Eleonora's Falcon (Falco eleonorae) in the world. The importance of Antikythira for studying bird migration led to the creation of Antikythera Bird Observatory (A.B.O) by the Hellenic Ornithological Society.

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I think this is a big discovery considering that Pavlopetri is located at the same area, few miles away where the Antihythera mechanism were found.




Pavlopetri the lost Greek city map.




Antikythera Island map.
WOW
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10/24/2009 07:21 PM
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Re: 5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets
Pavlopetri the lost Greek city map.
[link to en.wikipedia.org]


Antikythera Island map.

[link to members.virtualtourist.com]



[link to en.wikipedia.org]

Free Store

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10/24/2009 07:25 PM
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Re: 5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets
Must be a challenge to build a city underwater.
Anonymous Coward
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10/25/2009 09:50 PM
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Re: 5,000-year-old Underwater City Starts Yielding Secrets
abduct