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Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.

 
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Epic thread OP.

Question: If this strain of the virus has evolved with a lessor mortality rate, does the weakened condition of the host present a "target rich" environment that more deadly strains of any number of other viri?

If yes, doesn't it mean even the common cold could be deadly to the recovering infected?i
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 9908226


NAIL ON THE HEAD This is how HIV/AIDS kills, its not the virus itself, but usually some other infection that takes advantage of the compromised immune system.
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Thank you OP for a realistic appraisal of the situation..as for the rest...This

"The business of the journalists is to destroy the truth, to lie outright, to pervert, to vilify, to fawn at the feet of mammon, and to sell his country and his race for his daily bread. You know it and I know it, and what folly is this toasting an independent press? We are the tools and vassals of rich men behind the scenes. We are the jumping jacks, they pull the strings and we dance. Our talents, our possibilities and our lives are all the property of other men. We are intellectual prostitutes."
JohnSwinton, 1830-1901, Former chief-of-staff New York Times




MMMMMMmmmm!
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
maybe op needs to get a clue about the first strain of ebola to been found on this planet was admited later on to be man made research on Bovine Spongiform encelophatis...Mad cow disease.

The WHO and the CDC are statistic gathering services and we are just test subjects.

Ebola zaire strain which was first to go out of control after the infamous Philadelphia hotel incident with what was called the "legionaire disease"..which turned out to be of the SAME PROTEIN CHAIN!!!

Also Hiv and sars are based of the same protein chain as of Ebola...

This Oil based sickness is coming and they planned it since 2001!
 Quoting: Blitz the storm-striker


Hmmmm i hear ya...

However i'm not sure the primary interest is oil..
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
maybe op needs to get a clue about the first strain of ebola to been found on this planet was admited later on to be man made research on Bovine Spongiform encelophatis...Mad cow disease....

 Quoting: Blitz the storm-striker


Care to point me to a source supporting this statement?
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
whateverbsflag
 Quoting: Vaellene




Aren't there some cartoons on? The adults are trying to have a conversation here.


angryface
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Guys listen, this shit is scary. I get it, ok? I do. The human population of this world has always been kept in check by viruses, or some other method of sheer destruction. The Flu, Polio, Smallpox, you name it, these things have a purpose in nature. They keep populations under control.

Since the dawn of the industrial age we began to outsmart them all. We Vaccinate against the flu, we all but eradicated Polio in this country. We had beaten our enemies into near submission, and as a result, the worlds population has exploded. But our Genius is beginning to catch up with us. Anti-biotic resistant bacteria is on the rise, the flu is devising new ways to counter attack our defenses. And Ebola, well, lets just say it's doing what all viruses do. It's trying to survive, it's trying to find a way to use our own immune system against us. Think about this for a minute...

The Flu infects you, your body goes into defensive mode, realizing that it must expel the invader. So your own body fills your lungs with mucus and fluid, which forces you to cough. This is the real genius of the flu. It actually depends on your immune response to spread itself. And it doesn't have much time to do it either. Because your body begins to increase it's own temperature. Yes, having a fever is an immune response, not caused by the flu, rather it is literally your body attempting to make you so hot that the protein coat protecting the flu virus breaks down, allowing your white cells to attack.

This is what all viruses do. ALL of them. They find a way to exploit your natural immune responses to propagate themselves.

Ebola.... once just a hemorrhagic fever on steroids, now is a bona-fide menace. I work in a hospital laboratory at a major hospital in a major Metro Area. My wife works clinical micro for the same company. I'm very well versed in just about everything a STAT lab in a hospital can, and does do. My wife on the other hand, actually majored in micro, with emphasis on virology. So I wanted you all to know a few things about this outbreak that became apparent to us as it began to spread.

#1. Something has changed. This virus used to have a much shorter incubation period. And it would kill within a week. The mortality rate was much higher once upon a time. However, this is not the case anymore. Based on the sheer number of infected, the virus it seems, may have found a way to transmit itself easier. Typically when a virus "evolves" it gains in one area, while giving ground in another. It makes sense to me that Ebola gave up alot of it's lethality, for the ability to spread itself easier, and incubate much, much longer.

#2. Africa is a mess. There is no way to tell how many are infected. Once upon a time Ebola would strike a village and wipe everyone out, and that was it. It would kill so fast that it could not spread out of the hotzone. Because of what I said above that is not the case anymore. On a continent where borders still mean very little to the native population, it is a scary mix. Even if the CDC or the WHO wanted to get accurate numbers, it would be hopeless due to the unknown number or people that distrust western medicine, refuse to get help, or wander around from village to village. The infrastructure simply does not have the same capabilities we do in the west.

#3. Even in the United States, out of all the various hospitals I have worked at, there is no hope of containing anything like this. One of the largest hospitals I worked at only had two reverse flow isolation rooms. TWO, let that sink in for a minute. If this thing goes as bad as some think it will, we are, quite literally, screwed. Patients only show up to the hospital when they go symptomatic. So by the time they get there, they've already infected their entire family, their work group, and anyone they got within a few feet of on the way to the hospital. When they get there the ER nurses would treat it either like Flu, or Sepsis. But the whole time the patient is infecting all of them. And all of them, in turn, begin to infect everyone else in the exact same way. If this is as virulent as the WHO thinks it might be, by the time people realize what is going on, there will be more sick people than there would be beds available at every hospital in the US combined.

#4. Testing blood for anything is not as simple as looking under a microscope. And hospital labs are not set up for exotic virology. We run basic Chemistries, Cardiac enzymes, blood counts, sed rates, drug levels, bacterial cultures, all the basic hands on shit. The kind of things that old people usually present for, blood loss, infection, and cardiac events. Anything exotic gets sent out. Sometimes to the State lab, most of the time specimens get sent across the country to Quest Diagnostics, or to other organizations actually set up for it. Your average city hospital is pitifully, laughably, not ready for anything of this nature. Sure, running a CBC can tell if you are dehydrated, it can tell of you are loosing blood, it can tell if you are fighting "something" off. It just can't tell what. A sed rate can determine if you have excess inflammation, but it can't tell you why. A Lactic Acid level can indicate Sepsis, but it can't tell you from what. The point is, at the early stages of an outbreak, people will get treated for run of the mill things. Because nothing a hospital can test immediately will be able to tell anyone that you are carrying the most deadly hemorrhagic fever currently known. Honestly, if a person came into a busy ER with a fever, the triage nurse would put them in the waiting room until a non urgent room opened up in the back. They simply have no way to know who is carrying what.

I'm not saying we're all gonna die. This thing could fizzle out. And everything could be fine. What I am trying to illustrate here is that just because a lab exists in a hospital, does not mean that it can tell you everything. There are triage algorithms that work for everyday field medicine, but nothing for an outbreak. Thinking that living in a developed nation will curb the spread is ridiculous. If anything, it makes it worse. Our commute, our workplaces, our homes, our methods of entertainment, all of those things that we love so much about living in the the west, are the things that viruses depend on to spread.

If this virus truly has found a way to transmit easier, the healthcare system would be completely overloaded with something they simply can not handle.

Anyway, I'm not trying to scare anyone, I just hope people can be realistic about the capabilities of hospital containment, hospital laboratory testing, and the fact that the healthcare system, in ANY country, could not handle a massive outbreak.

So don't expect miracles from front line hospital staff, we don't have the tools, and we certainly do not have the manpower. Ask anyone in the medical field how much overtime they could work if they felt like it, don't even get me started on how thinly stretched people in the industry are. Though I suppose if this does turn into something, that will become apparent very, very fast.

Good luck, don't freak out, wash your hands, be prepared, hug your kids.

That is all.
 Quoting: Aravoth 35282601


Don't know who you are or how many of your facts are wrong but #2 about Ebola killing so fast and wiping out a whole village so that it couldn't escape the hot zone appears to be bogus...I looked up the history of ebola and here are two examples of 250 deaths in Kikwit which has a population of 400,000 and 224 deaths in Gulu, Masindi, and Mbarara...Gulu alone has over 100,000 residents!

Not sure if you are intentionally misleading people or just caught up in the doom...don't have time to fact check all your points but I'm calling BULLSHIT......at least you didn't say "get your damn vaccine!"

Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) Ebola virus 315 250 (81%) Occured in Kikwit and surrounding area. Traced to index case-patient who worked in forest adjoining the city. Epidemic spread through families and hospitals.

2000-2001 Uganda Sudan virus 425 224 (53%) Occurred in Gulu, Masindi, and Mbarara districts of Uganda. The three most important risks associated with Ebola virus infection were attending funerals of Ebola hemorrhagic fever case-patients, having contact with case-patients in one's family, and providing medical care to Ebola case-patients without using adequate personal protective measures. 18
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
#1. Something has changed. This virus used to have a much shorter incubation period. And it would kill within a week. The mortality rate was much higher once upon a time. However, this is not the case anymore. Based on the sheer number of infected, the virus it seems, may have found a way to transmit itself easier. Typically when a virus "evolves" it gains in one area, while giving ground in another. It makes sense to me that Ebola gave up alot of it's lethality, for the ability to spread itself easier, and incubate much, much longer.

#2. Africa is a mess. There is no way to tell how many are infected. Once upon a time Ebola would strike a village and wipe everyone out, and that was it. It would kill so fast that it could not spread out of the hotzone. Because of what I said above that is not the case anymore. On a continent where borders still mean very little to the native population, it is a scary mix. Even if the CDC or the WHO wanted to get accurate numbers, it would be hopeless due to the unknown number or people that distrust western medicine, refuse to get help, or wander around from village to village. The infrastructure simply does not have the same capabilities we do in the west.


That is all.
 Quoting: Aravoth 35282601


Don't know who you are or how many of your facts are wrong but #2 about Ebola killing so fast and wiping out a whole village so that it couldn't escape the hot zone appears to be bogus...I looked up the history of ebola and here are two examples of 250 deaths in Kikwit which has a population of 400,000 and 224
deaths in Gulu, Masindi, and Mbarara...Gulu alone has over 100,000 residents!

Not sure if you are intentionally misleading people or just caught up in the doom...don't have time to fact check all your points but I'm calling BULLSHIT......at least you didn't say "get your damn vaccine!"

Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) Ebola virus 315 250 (81%) Occured in Kikwit and surrounding area. Traced to index case-patient who worked in forest adjoining the city. Epidemic spread through families and hospitals.

2000-2001 Uganda Sudan virus 425 224 (53%) Occurred in Gulu, Masindi, and Mbarara districts of Uganda. The three most important risks associated with Ebola virus infection were attending funerals of Ebola hemorrhagic fever case-patients, having contact with case-patients in one's family, and providing medical care to Ebola case-patients without using adequate personal protective measures. 18
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 55538885


link: [link to www.cdc.gov]
Kybeam
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10/13/2014 07:33 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Maybe 10% of actual RNs, PAs and MDs are down in the ER; so, the first day, let's say only 5 people show up with symptoms undecipherable from a normal flu; there's 10 people all told in the ER to take care of them, plus your usual heart attacks, car accidents, gunshot victims, 'sore throats for a few weeks', little kids needing inhalers, and hypochondriacs.

The next day, there's 20 people with the same symptoms, plus the usuals.

The next day after that, there's 60 or 100, plus extra hypochondriacs because word is getting out and CNN is scaring everyone.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 61037425

Well, obiously it can't go on like that. In every existing Emergency Department there should be a special team assigned for handling those possible Ebola cases with high priority, and nothing else. And the qualified medical staff would have to shift their priorities as well - needless to say....
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 41221377


Are you just going create doctors and nurses out of thin air. Start over reading this tread you obviously are having trouble understanding it.
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola will do nothing.
 Quoting: T-Man

laugh
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
I listened... But heard nothing.
Razorbackkid

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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
maybe op needs to get a clue about the first strain of ebola to been found on this planet was admited later on to be man made research on Bovine Spongiform encelophatis...Mad cow disease.

The WHO and the CDC are statistic gathering services and we are just test subjects.

Ebola zaire strain which was first to go out of control after the infamous Philadelphia hotel incident with what was called the "legionaire disease"..which turned out to be of the SAME PROTEIN CHAIN!!!

Also Hiv and sars are based of the same protein chain as of Ebola...

This Oil based sickness is coming and they planned it since 2001!
 Quoting: Blitz the storm-striker


Me tell u now, oil become very sick.
Hope_Full

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10/13/2014 09:18 PM

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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Even on the hospital floors, alot of places still use duel occupancy patient rooms. So what happens if you have a 300 bed hospital, but almost every room is duel occupancy? I'll tell you, either everyones roommate gets infected, or all those duel occupancy rooms become single occupancy, and the amount of people that the hospital can handle just got halved.


 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 35282601


So, they put two people in a room and let them fight it out? Sounds reasonable.
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
op...maybe this question has already been asked but don't have time to go back thru the thread right now, but....where do you think or what do you think happened to louise troh and the 3 kids?? id like to hear your opinion please...thanks in advance
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
thank you op for posting this thread....I feel you know what you are talking about so I will listen. what do you think about prepping a lil? like anti diarrhea meds and bleach and electrolytes, just to be on the safe side?im not a fear monger but im very anal about always being prepared for anything. your suggestions?
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola = real , synthetic

2014 ebola outbreak - b.ullshit
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Guys listen, this shit is scary. I get it, ok? I do. The human population of this world has always been kept in check by viruses, or some other method of sheer destruction. The Flu, Polio, Smallpox, you name it, these things have a purpose in nature. They keep populations under control.

Since the dawn of the industrial age we began to outsmart them all. We Vaccinate against the flu, we all but eradicated Polio in this country. We had beaten our enemies into near submission, and as a result, the worlds population has exploded. But our Genius is beginning to catch up with us. Anti-biotic resistant bacteria is on the rise, the flu is devising new ways to counter attack our defenses. And Ebola, well, lets just say it's doing what all viruses do. It's trying to survive, it's trying to find a way to use our own immune system against us. Think about this for a minute...

The Flu infects you, your body goes into defensive mode, realizing that it must expel the invader. So your own body fills your lungs with mucus and fluid, which forces you to cough. This is the real genius of the flu. It actually depends on your immune response to spread itself. And it doesn't have much time to do it either. Because your body begins to increase it's own temperature. Yes, having a fever is an immune response, not caused by the flu, rather it is literally your body attempting to make you so hot that the protein coat protecting the flu virus breaks down, allowing your white cells to attack.

This is what all viruses do. ALL of them. They find a way to exploit your natural immune responses to propagate themselves.

Ebola.... once just a hemorrhagic fever on steroids, now is a bona-fide menace. I work in a hospital laboratory at a major hospital in a major Metro Area. My wife works clinical micro for the same company. I'm very well versed in just about everything a STAT lab in a hospital can, and does do. My wife on the other hand, actually majored in micro, with emphasis on virology. So I wanted you all to know a few things about this outbreak that became apparent to us as it began to spread.

#1. Something has changed. This virus used to have a much shorter incubation period. And it would kill within a week. The mortality rate was much higher once upon a time. However, this is not the case anymore. Based on the sheer number of infected, the virus it seems, may have found a way to transmit itself easier. Typically when a virus "evolves" it gains in one area, while giving ground in another. It makes sense to me that Ebola gave up alot of it's lethality, for the ability to spread itself easier, and incubate much, much longer.

#2. Africa is a mess. There is no way to tell how many are infected. Once upon a time Ebola would strike a village and wipe everyone out, and that was it. It would kill so fast that it could not spread out of the hotzone. Because of what I said above that is not the case anymore. On a continent where borders still mean very little to the native population, it is a scary mix. Even if the CDC or the WHO wanted to get accurate numbers, it would be hopeless due to the unknown number or people that distrust western medicine, refuse to get help, or wander around from village to village. The infrastructure simply does not have the same capabilities we do in the west.

#3. Even in the United States, out of all the various hospitals I have worked at, there is no hope of containing anything like this. One of the largest hospitals I worked at only had two reverse flow isolation rooms. TWO, let that sink in for a minute. If this thing goes as bad as some think it will, we are, quite literally, screwed. Patients only show up to the hospital when they go symptomatic. So by the time they get there, they've already infected their entire family, their work group, and anyone they got within a few feet of on the way to the hospital. When they get there the ER nurses would treat it either like Flu, or Sepsis. But the whole time the patient is infecting all of them. And all of them, in turn, begin to infect everyone else in the exact same way. If this is as virulent as the WHO thinks it might be, by the time people realize what is going on, there will be more sick people than there would be beds available at every hospital in the US combined.

#4. Testing blood for anything is not as simple as looking under a microscope. And hospital labs are not set up for exotic virology. We run basic Chemistries, Cardiac enzymes, blood counts, sed rates, drug levels, bacterial cultures, all the basic hands on shit. The kind of things that old people usually present for, blood loss, infection, and cardiac events. Anything exotic gets sent out. Sometimes to the State lab, most of the time specimens get sent across the country to Quest Diagnostics, or to other organizations actually set up for it. Your average city hospital is pitifully, laughably, not ready for anything of this nature. Sure, running a CBC can tell if you are dehydrated, it can tell of you are loosing blood, it can tell if you are fighting "something" off. It just can't tell what. A sed rate can determine if you have excess inflammation, but it can't tell you why. A Lactic Acid level can indicate Sepsis, but it can't tell you from what. The point is, at the early stages of an outbreak, people will get treated for run of the mill things. Because nothing a hospital can test immediately will be able to tell anyone that you are carrying the most deadly hemorrhagic fever currently known. Honestly, if a person came into a busy ER with a fever, the triage nurse would put them in the waiting room until a non urgent room opened up in the back. They simply have no way to know who is carrying what.

I'm not saying we're all gonna die. This thing could fizzle out. And everything could be fine. What I am trying to illustrate here is that just because a lab exists in a hospital, does not mean that it can tell you everything. There are triage algorithms that work for everyday field medicine, but nothing for an outbreak. Thinking that living in a developed nation will curb the spread is ridiculous. If anything, it makes it worse. Our commute, our workplaces, our homes, our methods of entertainment, all of those things that we love so much about living in the the west, are the things that viruses depend on to spread.

If this virus truly has found a way to transmit easier, the healthcare system would be completely overloaded with something they simply can not handle.

Anyway, I'm not trying to scare anyone, I just hope people can be realistic about the capabilities of hospital containment, hospital laboratory testing, and the fact that the healthcare system, in ANY country, could not handle a massive outbreak.

So don't expect miracles from front line hospital staff, we don't have the tools, and we certainly do not have the manpower. Ask anyone in the medical field how much overtime they could work if they felt like it, don't even get me started on how thinly stretched people in the industry are. Though I suppose if this does turn into something, that will become apparent very, very fast.

Good luck, don't freak out, wash your hands, be prepared, hug your kids.

That is all.
 Quoting: Aravoth 35282601

You might want to listen to OP. He is not selling doom here, he is simply stating the facts about our health care system and its limitations. My wife is a Nurse practitioner and has the same assessment of the lack of proper treatment centers for a wide spread viral epidemic. 5 stars OP.
cheers
 Quoting: Dark Shadow

RN at major medical facility (MC) in the midwest. I concur with what the OP has stated.
When it comes to overpopulation, what we fail to control mother nature will be more than glad to provide that control.
Look at any animal population, same thing occurs and too often with our help.
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
bsflag
NuKiNfUtZ
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Thread: Dallas Hospital Staff Questions if Ebola isnt Airborne!! Video with Nurse
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
maybe op needs to get a clue about the first strain of ebola to been found on this planet was admited later on to be man made research on Bovine Spongiform encelophatis...Mad cow disease.

The WHO and the CDC are statistic gathering services and we are just test subjects.

Ebola zaire strain which was first to go out of control after the infamous Philadelphia hotel incident with what was called the "legionaire disease"..which turned out to be of the SAME PROTEIN CHAIN!!!

Also Hiv and sars are based of the same protein chain as of Ebola...

This Oil based sickness is coming and they planned it since 2001!
 Quoting: Blitz the storm-striker


What sort of retard are you?
Anonymous Coward
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10/13/2014 10:58 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
maybe op needs to get a clue about the first strain of ebola to been found on this planet was admited later on to be man made research on Bovine Spongiform encelophatis...Mad cow disease.

The WHO and the CDC are statistic gathering services and we are just test subjects.

Ebola zaire strain which was first to go out of control after the infamous Philadelphia hotel incident with what was called the "legionaire disease"..which turned out to be of the SAME PROTEIN CHAIN!!!

Also Hiv and sars are based of the same protein chain as of Ebola...

This Oil based sickness is coming and they planned it since 2001!
 Quoting: Blitz the storm-striker


What sort of retard are you?
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 62877421


Still waiting for him to provide a link substantiating his claims. Doubt I'll get one.
Anonymous Coward
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10/13/2014 11:02 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
For those that have already read the thread, remember what I said about what will happen once this thing gets into a city with an international airport.

At this point, Dallas is NOT the only city with someone spreading this disease.
 Quoting: Aravoth


OP, I have been going through all the pages of this thread and have not seen any confirmed cases in other cities. Do you have links?
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10/13/2014 11:09 PM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
[quote:Anonymous Coward
So don't expect miracles from front line hospital staff, we don't have the tools, and we certainly do not have the manpower. Ask anyone in the medical field how much overtime they could work if they felt like it, don't even get me started on how thinly stretched people in the industry are. Though I suppose if this does turn into something, that will become apparent very, very fast.



I have solid information from friends who work in hospital administration and E.R in large city, they both tell me that a large portion of their staff will walk if this thing goes pandemic, they expect dramatic vacancies of the nurses and physicians in their facilities.

None of them, especially those with families are going to risk their own for the sake of the populace in this scenario, who could blame them.
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10/14/2014 12:04 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Obviously our HC system cannot
support a pandemic like Ebola.
A negligible lack of money and resources/
preparedness, which will/has leAd
to Ebolas spread, and soon sheer
mayhem. Also people in this country
are not United States "nationals"
who work for the state. We work for ourselves
and families and will not so easily expose
Ourselves to such a hideous and painful
virus. The psychological terror of this
virus will drive people mad as they watch
themselves turn black, like a burnt
corpse. This is a scourge and we need
To beg Gods protection from this on ourselves
and the nation. Like another Passover
Type thing. Stay in homes and pray.
Anonymous Coward
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10/14/2014 12:16 AM
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None of them, especially those with families are going to risk their own for the sake of the populace in this scenario, who could blame them.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 63973478



The price of lies.
FirstThingFirst

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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
Thanks, OP, for the information you posted on Ebola.

When the 2009 swine flu scare had started, I was reading up on plagues, etc. and I read books like "The Virus Hunter" and "Hotzone", and recommend them for learning more about this Ebola virus.

I also have been reading on epidemics, and for the plague what I learned was that one of the consistent modes of spread of the virus, besides rodents, were through ships. The infected ships would dock in a city and spread the plague. I think the airplanes are vectors of the Ebola virus now. Since it lasts several days (I think 4) outside the body, then it has more potential for infecting people, especially through air travel.

Also, the Ebola virus is invisible and deadly. That's what is scary. We can't see it, or touch it, or smell it. It's like other viruses, but even worse. I don't remember where I read this, but there was a village that had been isolated and far away from an Ebola outbreak, but they found the whole village had been wiped out from Ebola. The source? A sewing box that had been sent by a person who had Ebola to a villager. That's all it took to wipe out that village. So how do we know if it's here? How do we stop it in it's tracks? Who do we turn to, if we think we have it? How do we protect ourselves if a family member has it? All these questions are running through my mind. I still think that it's early enough to take precautionary measures (wipe down with bleach, wash hands regularly, eat at home, etc.) but that won't be enough to keep it contained. We have to isolate it at its source, and this is not happening as long as we have people traveling from West Africa here.

If you have any answers to my questions, OP, or anyone else, would appreciate it. This is a great thread.
Meadow
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10/14/2014 12:33 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.


If it's airborne and lasts up to
90 minutes before settling down,
can they put it in chem trails?
Spreading it all over our nation?
I imagine they are.
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10/14/2014 12:38 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola will do nothing.
 Quoting: T-Man


^^^^^this^^^^^
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 44550379


well the virus would do something but not as long as the whole outbreak is a scam and a pathetic msm hyped hoax.
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10/14/2014 01:18 AM
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Re: Ebola - A perspective you might need to hear.
ebola will do nothing.
 Quoting: T-Man


^^^^^this^^^^^
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 44550379


well the virus would do something but not as long as the whole outbreak is a scam and a pathetic msm hyped hoax.
 Quoting: Anonymous Coward 1472421


I hope it is.





GLP